A better discharge summary

Cite this article as:
Beckie Singer. A better discharge summary, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2020. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.21995

Discharge summaries, often considered the bane of every junior doctor and ED physician’s existence. But what if we took a step back and considered these as a clinical handover to primary care – similar in nature to the clinical handover that occurs in the transfer of care documents that you would send with a patient you are transferring to another hospital? They suddenly take on a whole other level of importance. Studies from the ‘adult medicine world‘ have shown that roughly 20% of patients experience an adverse event during the hospital-to-home transition, many of which could be mitigated by good handover between the hospital and the primary care provider.

I am Sam

Cite this article as:
Dani Hall. I am Sam, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.21781

This post is based on a talk Dani presented at the Irish Association of Emergency Medicine conference in November 2019. The talk wouldn’t have been possible without the extraordinary help and inspiration from Mike Farqhuar from the Evelina London Children’s Hospital and Mike Healy from the Linn Dara CAMHS Unit.

Top 10 Tips for Consultant Interviews

Cite this article as:
Tessa Davis. Top 10 Tips for Consultant Interviews, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.21861

I’m finally settling into some job security after 16 years of changing jobs every six months. One advantage of not being in run-through training has been the frequency of job interviews (and the consequent interview experience I’ve gained). The consultant interview involved another level of preparation. Facing this is a challenge, particularly for trainees who will not have had an interview for 6-8 years. My approach was to throw everything into it. I worked extremely hard to prepare, practice, and research – essentially leaving no stone unturned so that if I didn’t get the job at least I would know I’d done my best.

Virtual Reality: Camilla Sorensen at DFTB19

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Virtual Reality: Camilla Sorensen at DFTB19, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.21504

Imagine a world where you could teach CPR from a thousand miles away, a world where you can guide clinicians on the other side of the world. In this groundbreaking talk from DFTB19 Camilla Sørensen tackles another side of virtual reality. This one involves the clinician as power user.

 

 

©Ian Summers

(Editor’s note – I was so excited when I watched this talk that I promptly bought myself a VR headset)

 

This talk was recorded live at DFTB19 in London, England. With the theme of  “The Journey” we wanted to consider the journeys our patients and their families go on, both metaphorical and literal. DFTB20 will be held in Brisbane, Australia.

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

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Be productive and indistractible

Cite this article as:
Tessa Davis. Be productive and indistractible, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.21430

I love my phone (iPhone X) and I love my laptop (MacBook Pro 13″). But their aim is to enhance my productivity and not to detract from it. As apps, tech, and the way we communicate have evolved over the last 5 years, have we (or have I) evolved to handle them?

A wrinkle in time: Kerry Woolfall at DFTB19

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. A wrinkle in time: Kerry Woolfall at DFTB19, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.21185

Kerry Woolfall is a social scientist and senior lecturer at the University of Liverpool. This talk, our second from the PERUKI track, she talks about doing research without prior parent and patient consent.  Following legislative changes in 2008 it is now possible (in the UK at least) to enter a child into a trial of potentially life-saving treatment then seek consent after the fact. But how would parents react to this? How would clinicians? What would happen if a child died during the trial, as may understandably occur if we are looking at potentially life-saving interventions?

This talk is not just about a researchers point of view but also details Kerry’s experience from the other side of the clipboard as a NICU parent.

The research embodies a core principle of engagement.

 

You can read some of the research here.

 

Woolfall K, Young B, Frith L, Appleton R, Iyer A, Messahel S, Hickey H, Gamble C. Doing challenging research studies in a patient-centred way: a qualitative study to inform a randomised controlled trial in the paediatric emergency care setting. BMJ open. 2014 May 1;4(5):e005045.

Woolfall K, Frith L, Gamble C, Gilbert R, Mok Q, Young B. How parents and practitioners experience research without prior consent (deferred consent) for emergency research involving children with life threatening conditions: a mixed method study. BMJ open. 2015 Sep 1;5(9):e008522.

 

You can follow Kerry on Twitter here.

 

 

#DoodleMed below by @char_durand

 

This talk was recorded live at DFTB19 in London, England. With the theme of  “The Journey” we wanted to consider the journeys our patients and their families go on, both metaphorical and literal. DFTB20 will be held in Brisbane, Australia.

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

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Night shift anxiety

Cite this article as:
Ana Waddington. Night shift anxiety, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.20744

As I cycle home after a gruelling 12 hour shift, I see strange flashes from the corner of my eye. At the cafe where I have breakfast with my partner, I accidentally start buttering a tomato. I’m struggling to follow the flow of the conversation – all I can think of is sleep. Back home, I turn on the shower, expecting the water to hit my head – and realise that I’m still wearing my helmet. When I do finally get to bed, pulling the curtains closed on the beautiful day outside is physically painful. While everybody else is having fun – in the park, at the pub, enjoying the sun – I’m trying to ignore the slivers of light which creep into the bedroom, scrunching my eyes so tightly closed that I think might pull a muscle. And on top of all this – the exhaustion, the mental lapses, the irritation – I’m worrying about whether I’m going to be able to get enough rest to avoid feeling jet-lagged for the next two night shifts. 

Blowing the whistle: Kim Holt at DFTB19

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Blowing the whistle: Kim Holt at DFTB19, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.20736

You may recall the headlines surrounding the case of Baby P. Back in 2007 a 17 month old boy died as a result of injuries suffered over months of abuse. During that ordeal he had been seen by the London Borough of Haringey Children’s services and multiple concerns were raised. But nothing happened. Not until it was too late. Eight years earlier the same council had failed to intervene possibly leading to the death of eight year old Victoria Climbie.

Compassion to the Core: Mary Freer at DFTB19

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Compassion to the Core: Mary Freer at DFTB19, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.20653

Mary Freer has been with us from the start. After a heartfelt keynote at our first conference we knew we had to keep in touch. In London we set her a challenge. We asked her to set the intention for the day for us, to frame our conversations around care.

The Medicines Handbook: Simon Craig at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. The Medicines Handbook: Simon Craig at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.20590

Ask any paediatrician what the hardest, tricksiest procedure that you might ever have to perform and they would all be in agreement – calculating drug doses in the middle of a paediatric resuscitation. In this talk Simon Craig, from Monash, takes us through the how we can do better than scratching out rough calculations on the whiteboard at 6am. He asked the key question…

 

 

 

 

 

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story‘ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families.

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

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*Lori was once one of Andy Tagg’s trainees but he is quick to point out that none of the situations depicted are about him.