Tessa Davis is a Consultant in Paediatric Emergency Medicine. She is from Glasgow and Sydney, but is currently living in London. @tessardavis | + Tessa Davis | Tessa's DFTB posts

  • facebook
  • googleplus
  • twitter

Pulled elbows

Cite this article as:
Davis, T. Pulled elbows, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
http://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.16407

Annie is a 2 year old who has a painful arm. Her mum was holding her hand as she walked along the pavement. Annie tripped and Annie’s mum tried to stop the fall. Since then she hasn’t been using the arm as much.   Thanks to Simon Craig for his post-publication contribution.   Anatomy The…

DOI and Altmetric

Uncategorized
Cite this article as:
Davis, T. DOI and Altmetric, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
http://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.16287

This month, DFTB launched our one year trial of a new way of measuring impact and encouraging the referencing and sharing of our posts. We have done three things: added a Cite box; got DOIs for each post; added the use of Altmetric. Debate has been ongoing for several years about how best to measure…

Facing the future: standards for children in EM settings

Cite this article as:
Davis, T. Facing the future: standards for children in EM settings, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
http://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.16004

Today saw the launch of the new RCPCH ‘Facing the Future’ document – setting standards for paediatric emergency care in the UK. These are a set of standards that should apply to all Emergency Department where children are seen and assessed.

Can Point-of-Care CRP testing identify children with serious infection?

Cite this article as:
Davis, T. Can Point-of-Care CRP testing identify children with serious infection?, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
http://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.15806

As paediatric emergency clinicians, a large part of our job is identifying the child with a serious infection. The utility of blood tests in helping with diagnosis in this group of children is debatable. Could point-of-care CRP testing help identify children with serious infection?