Back to School

Cite this article as:
Andrew Tagg. Back to School, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2020. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.23086

It’s the first day of school here in Australia and parents and carers are waving their young children off with a kiss for their first day.  When I first saw the size of school bags I was amazed. How can children carry so much? Surely they will just fall over and lie on their backs waving their little legs in the air like distressed turtles? What on earth are they carrying in there that needs the Bag of Holding?*

 

 

What’s the problem?

Barbosa J, Marques MC, Izquierdo M, Neiva HP, Barbosa TM, Ramírez-Vélez R, Alonso-Martínez AM, García-Hermoso A, Aguado-Jimenez R, Marinho DA. Schoolbag weight carriage in Portuguese children and adolescents: a cross-sectional study comparing possible influencing factors. BMC pediatrics. 2019 Dec;19(1):157.

With reduced access to lockers, it seems that children are taking the weight of the world on their shoulders. Surprisingly, this Portuguese group found that Grade 5 children carried more than Grade 9 kids. This trend has been replicated in New Zealand with Grade 3 kids carrying around 7kg (13.2% of their body weight) and Grade 6 leavers bearing only 6.3Kg (10.3% body weight). Most school items have a set weight, no matter what grade you are in, but one might have thought that as the educational load increases over the years so might the weight of the textbooks. Perhaps an increase in the use of personal electronic devices and e-books accounts for some of this difference.

Surely carrying those giant bags can’t be good for the growing body? Neck, back, and shoulder pain are prevalent in adolescents and are closely linked by carrying heavy school bags. These effects take place when the bag weighs more than 10% of their body weight. In nearly every study girls carry more than boys. This makes sense as although they may carry exactly the same things in their rucksacks girls are generally lighter and so the weight of their bag, as a percentage of their total body weight, is higher.

 

Mandrekar S, Chavhan D, Shyam AK, Sancheti PK. Effects of carrying school bags on cervical and shoulder posture in static and dynamic conditions in adolescent students. International journal of adolescent medicine and health. 2019 Oct 30.

This group looked at how they carry their bags. Trying to be cool and swinging your bag over just one shoulder changes one’s static biomechanics.  The head and neck move forward to compensate and the carrying shoulder rises. Then, because the centre of gravity is shifted the subject would tilt their torso away. Could this be the cause of the stereotypical teenage posture? It took just five minutes of bag wearing for any postural changes to become evident. It has also been suggested that a heavier bag weight is associated with an increased incidence of lower back pain in teens and this, in turn, is linked with an increased risk of lower back pain as an adult.

If they are not wearing their back slung over one shoulder they are wearing it slung low, rather than high and tight on their shoulders, and most of the biomechanic data suggests this puts a lower degree of stress on their lumbar spines than letting it ride high. The higher position also lends itself to more forward rotation of the pelvis and greater hip flexion. And, of course, wearing your bag on the front, instead of on the back, causes a whole new range of issues.

Harmless?

Whilst this post is focusing on just one potential downside of heavy school bags, Wierseema et al. found 247 children with injuries related to backpack use between 1999-2000. These were due to tripping over them (28%), getting hit by one (13%) or just trying to put them on (8%). Actually wearing the thing was associated with another 13% of complaints – specifically back pain.

There is also a condition called backpack palsy or, to be more accurate, backpack brachial plexus palsy. It is much more common in military recruits but can occur in children. Often unilateral, the paraesthesia, pain and sensory loss in addition to possible muscle wasting are due to neuropraxia of the brachial plexus.

Losing weight?

Does it make a difference if teenagers take some of the rubbish out of their bags?

Rodríguez-Oviedo P, Santiago-Pérez MI, Pérez-Ríos M, Gómez-Fernández D, Fernández-Alonso A, Carreira-Núñez I, García-Pacios P, Ruano-Ravina A. Backpack weight and back pain reduction: effect of an intervention in adolescents. Pediatric research. 2018 Jul;84(1):34.

This Spanish group targetted teenagers with an educational intervention. This comprised of a one-hour session on posture, the effects of backpack weight and some healthy lifestyle advice. They found that the intervention arm of the trial did indeed have (statistically significant) lighter bags moving forward in the younger cohorts but not in the older ones.

Strapping in?

Mathur H, Desai A, Khan SA. To determine the efficacy of addition of horizontal waist strap to the traditional double shoulder strap school backpack loading on cervical and shoulder posture in Indian school-going children. Int J Phys Med Rehabil. 2017;5(434):2.

If you want to reduce the usual bag-induced postural slump these authors, looking at 60 children, suggest that adding a waist strap to the usual two shoulder straps could make all the difference.

So what does this all mean?

As parents, we need to keep an eye on what our children are actually putting in their bags (compared to what they say they are putting in there). Perhaps we should weigh the bags as often as the children and limit the number of keyrings and Beanie Boos attached to the outside? Perhaps we need to further embrace technology and allow for the increased use of electronic devices coupled with a much, much older technology and let them use bags on wheels, similar to carry on luggage?

There have been a number of initiatives to make the wearing of school backpacks healthier. Sri Lanka introduced a National Healthy Schoolbag Campaign aimed at improving the lives of children. Large textbooks were split into smaller volumes to make it easier to carry just one small book around and a multidisciplinary schoolbag regulatory council was set up to liaise with industry partners to help regulate bags. In the US the “Pack it light, wear it right” initiative focussed on what the individual could do.

 

*If you really want to know what is in their bags you need to look inside. This wonderful paper from Archives suggests that the vast majority (96%) of parents had never checked the weight of their children’s bags and 34% had never even looked inside

Forjuoh SN, Little D, Schuchmann JA, Lane BL. Parental knowledge of school backpack weight and contents. Archives of disease in childhood. 2003 Jan 1;88(1):18-9.

 

Other Selected References:

American Academy of Pediatrics. How not to wear a school backpack. AAP Grand Rounds. 2008 Nov 1;20(5):58-9.

Brackley HM, Stevenson JM. Are children’s backpack weight limits enough?: A critical review of the relevant literature. Spine. 2004 Oct 1;29(19):2184-90.

Kim KE, Kim EJ. Incidence and risk factors for backpack palsy in young Korean soldiers. Journal of the Royal Army Medical Corps. 2016 Feb 1;162(1):35-8.

Goodgold S, Corcoran M, Gamache D, Gillis J, Guerin J, Coyle JQ. Backpack use in children. Pediatric physical therapy: the official publication of the Section on Pediatrics of the American Physical Therapy Association. 2002;14(3):122-31.

Jayaratne K, Jacobs K, Fernando D. Global healthy backpack initiatives. Work. 2012 Jan 1;41(Supplement 1):5553-7.

Maurya S, Singh M, Bhandari PS, Bhatti TS. Backpack brachial plexus palsy. Indian Journal of Neurotrauma. 2009 Dec;6(02):153-4.

Rose K, Davies A, Pitt M, Ratnasinghe D, D’Argenzio L. Backpack palsy: A rare complication of backpack use in children and young adults–A new case report. european journal of paediatric neurology. 2016 Sep 1;20(5):750-3.

Talbott NR, Bhattacharya A, Davis KG, Shukla R, Levin L. School backpacks: it’s more than just a weight problem. Work. 2009 Jan 1;34(4):481-94.

Weir E. Avoiding the back-to-school backache. CMAJ: Canadian Medical Association journal= journal de l’Association medicale canadienne. 2002 Sep;167(6):669-.

Wiersema BM, Wall EJ, Foad SL. Acute backpack injuries in children. Pediatrics. 2003 Jan 1;111(1):163-6.

Catch 22

Cite this article as:
Ana Waddington. Catch 22, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.19122

James was 13 the first time I treated him in A&E. He was rushed in after being hit on the head with a metal bar, but he wouldn’t tell us what had happened. Some others had seen him, rushed him, started beating him with bats and bars – that was all he said he remembered. It was clear that James was already deeply involved in the world of gang violence, and it was equally clear that if he wasn’t saved from it soon this world would destroy him. We tried to get James to stay in A&E long enough to hear the results of his scan, but as soon as he got a chance he slipped out and back onto the streets. My fear was that before long the streets would deliver him back to us, only this time he wouldn’t be able to walk out again.

Legal and Ethical Quandaries: Ian Summers at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Legal and Ethical Quandaries: Ian Summers at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18919

When most of us think of ethics and law our eyes roll and we picture Rumpole of the Bailey and quiet Sunday afternoons in front of the television. But his time Ian Summers came up with something unique. Pushing the boundaries of simulation as an educational medium he introduced us to a series of hypotheticals. Take your time to watch rather than just listen to your iDevice. You’ll learn about ethical practice in paediatrics but if you pause, take a step back, and press play again, you’ll see a masterclass of simulation in action.

 

 

 

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story‘ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families.

 

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

 

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An approach to irritability and pain in the severely neurologically impaired child.

Cite this article as:
Henry Goldstein. An approach to irritability and pain in the severely neurologically impaired child., Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18178

Logan is a 6yo who is presented to ED by his mother, one Tuesday evening as “just not himself“. Logan is well known to your local paediatric team for management of his GMFCS 5 spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy. He has a long list of comorbidities, frequent hospital attendance and multiple unplanned admissions for, variously, aspiration pneumonia, seizures or irritability ?cause.

Five go on an adventure: hosted by Deb Shellshear at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Five go on an adventure: hosted by Deb Shellshear at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.17621

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story’ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families.

Abnormal Treatment Behaviour: Jannie Geertsema at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Abnormal Treatment Behaviour: Jannie Geertsema at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.17711

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story’ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families. Tickets for DFT19, which will be held in London, UK, are now on sale from www.dftb19.com.

Jannie Geertsema is a Child and Adolescent Psychiatrist at the Queensland Children’s Hospital. In this talk he reminds us of one of the challenges that faces all doctors – who are we actually treating? Is it the child in front of us, is it their mother, is it the family dynamic?

Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: David Coghill at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder: David Coghill at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.17604

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story’ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families. Tickets for DFT19, which will be held in London, UK, are now on sale from www.dftb19.com.

How to draw a Genogram

Cite this article as:
Daniel Bakhsh. How to draw a Genogram, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.17132

As a Student Doctor at the University of Queensland, I was offered the opportunity to shadow the Adolescent Team at The Child and Youth Mental Health Service (or CYMHS) at the Queensland Children’s Hospital. This was an amazing opportunity to observe some really important work in two of my special interest areas: Paediatrics and Psychiatry. The attachment really drove home that patients don’t exist in isolation, and how this is particularly true for children. The surrounding family system strongly dictates how well they will fare once they leave the hospital.

As part of this attachment I was asked to prepare and present Genograms for every patient at the weekly Multidisciplinary Team meeting. As I began to interview family members in order to gather the required 3 generations of family history, it became clear to me that a small diagram could represent and quickly convey what would otherwise have taken several pages of text. Genograms provide a wealth of insight at a glance, can help align patients with their most appropriate care, and are relatively easy to draw once you know how. They are a mainstay of Paediatrics for a reason.

When I first came across Genograms as a student, attempting to create one was very confusing and a little overwhelming. There are also surprisingly few reference materials available to aid you along the way. So in order to make this task a little easier for the next student, I put together this little video. I hope you find it useful.

– Daniel Bakhsh, Student Doctor, Doctor of Medicine Program, University of Queensland

Stabbings in kids – when and where?

Cite this article as:
Tessa Davis. Stabbings in kids – when and where?, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.17240

You cannot have missed the UK media stories about the increase in stabbings in young people; and the data from hospitals in London supports this. This week saw the publication of an article in BMJ Open sharing data from stabbing presentations to a major trauma centre in London.

Diana Egerton-Warbuton: Reducing alcohol related harm in adolescents at DFTB17

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Diana Egerton-Warbuton: Reducing alcohol related harm in adolescents at DFTB17, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2017. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.13984

This talk was recorded live on the opening plenary session of day two at DFTB17 in Brisbane.