There are people with games: Vic Brazil at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. There are people with games: Vic Brazil at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.19086

The  audience at DFTB18 were privileged to attend a series of sessions from team at Simulcast, the premier podcast for all things sim and debriefing. 

In this first talk of the session Vic Brazil interviews Kara Allen about the place of simulation and asks ‘Is at really all that?‘ Kara Allen is a consultant anaesthetist at the Royal Melbourne Hospital and Clinical Lead at Monash Simulation. Whilst sim seems like an exciting way of doing ‘stuff’ and we all love the chance to get out of our respective departments and play let’s- pretend is it fit for purpose?

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story‘ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families.

DFTB19 has just a handful of main conference tickets left but there are still spots for some of the pre-conference workshops.

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

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The illusion of patient choice

Cite this article as:
Amit Bali. The illusion of patient choice, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.19010

“Pick a card…any card”, as the saying goes.

I remember being the recipient of this common trick when a medical student, at a friend’s for dinner where a magician was a fellow guest. The scientist in me wanted to know how it was done, so I prepared to follow my card studiously. I chose carefully and deliberately, feinting to pick one card from the fan offered to me, before choosing – in my eyes – a less obvious card. However, after returning the card to the deck, the magician threw his arms up with a flourish, the pack hitting th eceiling with a thud, causing cards to scatter across the room. Amazingly, my chosen card was stuck to the ceiling, fixed in place by a drawing pin.

I made peace with the fact I was always going to choose that card, and applauded in awe.

 

The ‘magician’s choice’

A few years ago, during a lecture, I was introduced to the concept of the‘magician’s choice’ by Daniel Sokol (a medical ethicist and magician). He used it as an innovative analogy to illustrate how, in obtaining consent, the presentation of the different options is nothing like the free choice it is intended to be. Rather, the possibilities are presented, much like a deck of cards, only this time the ‘trick’ is that the clinician– whether consciously or not – weights information, making a certain choice more likely. I was reminded of this concept recently, after reading about a new app due to be rolled out in the English National Health System. This new platform, it is claimed, will enable patients to see waiting times at different emergency departments, the implication being that they will choose to go to the one with the shortest wait. Unsurprisingly, this sparked Twitter debate about whether or not this actually was a useful tool to help patient flow, with strong opinions on either side.

To my surprise, however, the assumption from everyone seemed to be that this app would offer choice. To which my first thought was: ‘choice, what choice?’

 

Patient choice?

For many years, the NHS has offered explicit patient choice for specialist outpatient care, offering a range of different hospitals at the point of referral. In recent years, the system has evolved to display waiting times. Sounds good so far? To an extent, I agree. A transparent system that allows patients, in conjunction with their GP, to book in to an appointment – even obtaining a date and time – is a pretty simple but effective use of technology. My objection is that the offered choice is nothing but an illusion.

The patient is given little idea of the constraints through which their choice is being made. As an example, many of the children I see have a long-term condition (epilepsy). Effective, joined-up care is much more than a quick hospital consultation, achieved through a combination of having a point of contact via their specialist nurse, close liaison with school, tracking of development progress, and surveillance of mental health and wellbeing. This is best achieved through local, networked care, a system which has been carefully developed over many years.When I see a patient outside this framework, the care is not just difficult to deliver – in what is far from a delicious irony, it actually gets delayed. When I have to inform families that ‘I can’t access that information’, ‘they won’t accept that referral from me’, or ‘our nurse doesn’t cover that area’ (all recurring themes from my practice over the last year), I empathise with the fact that they took a decision that they thought would get quicker access to care for their child, only to now discover that delay was just shifted further down the road. There are potential ways around this – not least patient record systems that speak to each other. Yet that sort of change doesn’t happen overnight so, until it does, surely patients deserve better? Until then, this resembles the ‘three cup and ball’ trick. The patient believes they have options, when actually the system is too constrained to offer the truly free choice that is advertised. No matter how much you try to pick the cup with the ball under it, the pieces move and the magician ensures you never can.

Legal and Ethical Quandaries: Ian Summers at DFTB18

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Team DFTB. Legal and Ethical Quandaries: Ian Summers at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18919

When most of us think of ethics and law our eyes roll and we picture Rumpole of the Bailey and quiet Sunday afternoons in front of the television. But his time Ian Summers came up with something unique. Pushing the boundaries of simulation as an educational medium he introduced us to a series of hypotheticals. Take your time to watch rather than just listen to your iDevice. You’ll learn about ethical practice in paediatrics but if you pause, take a step back, and press play again, you’ll see a masterclass of simulation in action.

 

 

 

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story‘ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families.

 

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

 

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Women and Children First?

Cite this article as:
Davis, T et al.. Women and Children First?, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18694

There is an unwritten rule amongst the team at DFTB – equity and equality for all. As conference organizers we have always been proud to have equal gender representation throughout our events – both in terms of keynote speakers and sessional speakers. We took a look at the data to see how common this was in the field of paediatrics. You can see that report here.

Don’t Forget The Twitter

Cite this article as:
Grace Leo. Don’t Forget The Twitter, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18310

Perhaps you’ve been introduced to FOAMed and have dipped a toe into the land of Twitter but until now have been hesitant about joining in… here are some top tips from the DFTB Team to help you on your Twitter journey at the upcoming conference and beyond!

Cutting edge burns management: Fiona Wood at DFTB18

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Team DFTB. Cutting edge burns management: Fiona Wood at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18295

Professor Fiona Wood, AM, is one of the worlds leading burns surgeons.  Having qualified from St Thomas’ in London she decided to do what so many of us do and move down under. Since the early days of her career, she has recognized that to improve the outcomes of burns victims involves not just scarless skin but also healing in mind and spirit. Along with Marie Stoner, she pioneered the use of ‘spray-on skin’ and is well known for the care she provided to the victims of the Bali bombings back in October 2002.

In this talk, she talks about the past, the present and the future of burns care whilst championing the roles of women in medicine and surgery. As a mother of six children, she reminds us all that there is nothing that cannot be achieved if you ask for it.

 

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story’ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families.

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

 

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A future towards zero: Warwick Teague at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. A future towards zero: Warwick Teague at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18203

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story’ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families. Tickets for DFTB19, which will be held in London, UK, are now on sale from www.dftb19.com.

Antenatal Counselling: Trish Woods at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Antenatal Counselling: Trish Woods at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18153

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story’ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families. Tickets for DFTB19, which will be held in London, UK, are now on sale from www.dftb19.com.

Being a NICU parent: Joanne and Scott Beedie at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Being a NICU parent: Joanne and Scott Beedie at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18131

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story’ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families. Tickets for DFTB19, which will be held in London, UK, are now on sale from www.dftb19.com.

Feeding problems in infancy: David Tickell at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Feeding problems in infancy: David Tickell at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.17426

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story’ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families. Tickets for DFT19, which will be held in London, UK, are now on sale from www.dftb19.com.

Tell me your story: Michelle Johnston at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Tell me your story: Michelle Johnston at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.17125

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story’ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families. Tickets for DFT19, which will be held in London, UK, are now on sale from www.dftb19.com.

Stabbings in adolescents

Cite this article as:
Tessa Davis. Stabbings in adolescents, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.17337

It’s a regular day in your Paeds ED. You’ve just pulled a piece of lego out of a child left nostril; there are two wheezy kids waiting for review to see if they can stretch to two hours; and there is a 2 month old with a rash that you’re currently seeing  – everyone is waiting for you to come up with a clever diagnosis. As you stare at the spots and wait for some inspiration, you hear one of your nursing colleagues call…