Being a NICU parent: Joanne and Scott Beedie at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Being a NICU parent: Joanne and Scott Beedie at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18131

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story’ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families. Tickets for DFTB19, which will be held in London, UK, are now on sale from www.dftb19.com.

Feeding problems in infancy: David Tickell at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Feeding problems in infancy: David Tickell at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.17426

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story’ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families. Tickets for DFT19, which will be held in London, UK, are now on sale from www.dftb19.com.

Tell me your story: Michelle Johnston at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Tell me your story: Michelle Johnston at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.17125

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story’ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families. Tickets for DFT19, which will be held in London, UK, are now on sale from www.dftb19.com.

Stabbings in adolescents

Cite this article as:
Tessa Davis. Stabbings in adolescents, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.17337

It’s a regular day in your Paeds ED. You’ve just pulled a piece of lego out of a child left nostril; there are two wheezy kids waiting for review to see if they can stretch to two hours; and there is a 2 month old with a rash that you’re currently seeing  – everyone is waiting for you to come up with a clever diagnosis. As you stare at the spots and wait for some inspiration, you hear one of your nursing colleagues call…

Vaccine hesitancy: Margie Danchin at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Vaccine hesitancy: Margie Danchin at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.17112

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story’ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families. Tickets for DFT19, which will be held in London, UK, are now on sale from www.dftb19.com.

How to draw a Genogram

Cite this article as:
Daniel Bakhsh. How to draw a Genogram, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.17132

As a Student Doctor at the University of Queensland, I was offered the opportunity to shadow the Adolescent Team at The Child and Youth Mental Health Service (or CYMHS) at the Queensland Children’s Hospital. This was an amazing opportunity to observe some really important work in two of my special interest areas: Paediatrics and Psychiatry. The attachment really drove home that patients don’t exist in isolation, and how this is particularly true for children. The surrounding family system strongly dictates how well they will fare once they leave the hospital.

As part of this attachment I was asked to prepare and present Genograms for every patient at the weekly Multidisciplinary Team meeting. As I began to interview family members in order to gather the required 3 generations of family history, it became clear to me that a small diagram could represent and quickly convey what would otherwise have taken several pages of text. Genograms provide a wealth of insight at a glance, can help align patients with their most appropriate care, and are relatively easy to draw once you know how. They are a mainstay of Paediatrics for a reason.

When I first came across Genograms as a student, attempting to create one was very confusing and a little overwhelming. There are also surprisingly few reference materials available to aid you along the way. So in order to make this task a little easier for the next student, I put together this little video. I hope you find it useful.

– Daniel Bakhsh, Student Doctor, Doctor of Medicine Program, University of Queensland

Want to come to DFTB19?

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Want to come to DFTB19?, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.17079

After two years in Australia it is time for the Don’t Forget the Bubbles team to take a journey. Whilst it might be just an underground away for some it is a bit further for some of us. With over 70 pitches from speakers from around the world we have taken our time to curate an amazing program for you all.

You can now head over to www.dftb19.com and take a look!

We are also excited to announce some new workshops.

Join Mary Freer as she brings her Compassion Revolution to England, or sit in with Ross Fisher and Grace Leo and get better at presenting. Or, if they don’t take your fancy then why not join Ian Summers and friends and learn how to take your sim and debriefing to the next level.

Tickets for all of the workshops and the conference itself are now available at www.dftb19.com

If you can’t make it, don’t worry, we’ve got you covered. All the talks will be recorded and put out as podcasts after the event.

 

 

DFTB go to New York

Cite this article as:
Andrew Tagg. DFTB go to New York, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.17016

I first heard of the FemInEM crew in Dublin. Dara Kass, Jenny Beck-Esmay and Stacey Poznanski took to the stage to talk about the birth of FemInEM, first as a blog then as a resource to effect change in the conversation around gender and equity in emergency medicine. Since then they have grown to be a leading voice in this area.

Their first sell out conference, FIX17, in New York brought together a unique set of voices and when the call came out for pitches to speak at FIX18 I thought it would be the perfect place for me to tell a story. This blog post isn’t about my tale – you can read A short story about deathand life here – but about something else.

I consider myself well-travelled, having spent almost 5 years of my life working as a doctor on board cruise ships, but hearing the talks at FIX18 made me realise I a still living in my own little bubble. Everything I hear via Twitter or other forms of social media comes pre-filtered by the source. So if I only follow white hetero-males they inform my worldview. The conference reminded me that there are other voices and other realities.

 

Sex and gender

In a conference where I was clearly in the minority, I was constantly reminded of things I have just taken for granted. Nick Gorton, a transman,  really opened my eyes when he told the audience that life had been like playing a video game on hard mode then, when he became a man, everything just switched over to easy. Look out for his great talk when it comes out…

 

Race

You only have to read the newspaper headlines on any given day to see how race plays a role in the public perception of a person. To hear Arabia Mollette say that she will never be seen as a woman first when she walks into a room because she is a person of colour made me feel uncomfortable. I’d like to think that I don’t see the world that way, but we all have our implicit biases. Don’t think you are biased? Then try out one of the Harvard Implicit Bias tests over at Project Implicit.

 

Privilege

A lot of medics come from a place of privilege, parents with degree level education and jobs that pay well. Many have parents that are, or were, doctors.  Regina Royan spoke of a different type of upbringing, of families struggling to make ends meet, and of the hidden challenges this brings from the start of medical training – not just in the shockingly high costs to apply to medical school in the US but also on things like electives and placements away from your home base.

 

I have lived, comfortably, within my own little bubble of existence. FemInEM has challenged me to expand my worldview, to listen to dissenting voices, and ask more questions.

 

For more accounts of FIX18 then read these accounts…

Penny Wilson – Getting my feminist FIX in New York

Shannon MacNamara – Telling stories to FIX things

Annie Slater – We support, We Amplify, We Promote

 

Are there too few women presenting at paediatric conferences?

Cite this article as:
Davis, T. et al. Are there too few women presenting at paediatric conferences?, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.16879

Sometimes we have a great idea for a paper but try as we might we cannot get it published in the traditional way. So what better means of disseminating knowledge than publishing it right here, on the Don’t Forget the Bubbles website? Given that this is the week of FIX18, the Feminem Idea eXchange, it seems like there is no better time like the present to discuss female presenters at paediatric conferences.

Tell me a story…

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Tell me a story…, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.16484

“He held up a book then. “I’m going to read it to you to help you relax.”

“Does it have any sports in it?”

“Fencing. Fighting. Torture. Poison. True Love. Hate. Revenge. Giants. Hunters. Bad men. Good men. Beautifulest Ladies. Snakes. Spiders… Pain. Death. Brave men. Cowardly men. Strongest men. Chases. Escapes. Lies. Truths. Passion. Miracles.”

“Sounds okay,” I said and I kind of closed my eyes.”

William Goldman, The Princess Bride

Ross Fisher: What surgeons wish you knew from DFTB17

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Ross Fisher: What surgeons wish you knew from DFTB17, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.16201

This talk was recorded live on the final of DFTB17 in Brisbane. If you missed out in 2017 then why not book your leave for 2018 now. Tickets are on sale for the pre-conference workshops as well as the conference itself at www.dftb18.com.

What more can be said about Ross Fisher that hasn’t already been said? Passionate presenter, good (but not perfect*) surgeon and friend to the stars – in this talk Ross delves into the hidden world of paediatric surgery.