The 34th Bubble Wrap

Cite this article as:
Grace Leo. The 34th Bubble Wrap, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.21594

Article 1: Implementation of the neonatal sepsis calculator

Akangire G et al. Implementation of the Neonatal Sepsis Calculator in Early-Onset Sepsis and Maternal Chorioamnionitis. Advances in Neonatal Care. September 2019; Publish Ahead-of-Print: doi: 10.1097/ANC.0000000000000668 (accessed 20 October 2019)

What’s it about?

This quality improvement project aimed to develop guidelines and education materials for implementing the neonatal sepsis calculator published by Kaiser Permanente in 2017 in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The calculator predicts the probability of neonatal early-onset sepsis (EOS) in babies ≥34 weeks gestation, based on maternal risk factors for chorioamnionitis and the baby’s clinical presentation.

The calculator then makes a clinical recommendation (no blood culture or antibiotics, blood culture but no antibiotics, or blood culture and antibiotics), and recommends the frequency of recording vital signs for the baby. The calculator relies on users knowing the incidence of early- onset sepsis for their particular hospital/neonatal unit. The calculator is gaining in popularity (certainly in my recent experience), but guidelines for its implementation in individual neonatal units are lacking. One of the concerns is that the calculator will take the place of clinical judgement. The researchers were based at a Level III NICU in the USA. They evaluated current blood culture collection and antibiotic use for suspected EOS in their unit, then developed guidelines and education materials for implementing the neonatal sepsis calculator, and then re-evaluated rates of blood culture collection and antibiotic use.


Why does it matter?

Neonatal early-onset sepsis (EOS) is culture-positive invasive infection that presents in the first 72 hours of life, with Group B streptococcus (GBS or S. agalactiae) the main culprit. Guidelines for screening for and treating suspected neonatal EOS vary, with the conventional wisdom suggesting at least 48 hours of empirical antibiotics for treatment of suspected EOS due to maternal chorioamnionitis. The definition of maternal chorioamnionitis also varies based on maternal symptoms, including intrapartum and postpartum fever and clinical instability. EOS guidelines vary for and within each state and territory in Australia, with some units implementing the neonatal sepsis calculator, and others using stricter guidelines for evaluation and treatment of suspected neonatal EOS. NICE Guidelines from the UK do not refer to the calculator, but use risk factors, clinical indicators, and red flags to guide antibiotic management decisions (https://pathways.nice.org.uk/pathways/early-onset-neonatal-infection).

In the study, in the 4 months prior to implementing the neonatal sepsis calculator, antibiotic use for suspected EOS was 11%, and blood culture was done on 14.8% of live births. The calculator was subsequently implemented for 6 months. In the 4 months post-implementation, neonatal sepsis calculator use was more than 95%, antibiotic use decreased significantly to 5%, and blood culture use dropped to 7.6%.

Importantly, the researchers considered the management of asymptomatic neonates, for whom the implementation of the neonatal sepsis calculator represented the greatest change in practice. The calculator uses the highest antepartum maternal temperature to indicate chorioamnionitis. In asymptomatic infants, if there is no maternal fever, but a clinical diagnosis of chorioamnionitis is made, the neonatal sepsis calculator may recommend observation only, with no blood culture or antibiotics. By contrast, the neonatologists in the study agreed that in these cases, a full blood count and blood culture should be done, with antibiotics withheld.

The researchers did not advocate blanket implementation of the neonatal sepsis calculator in the absence of clinical reasoning. Indeed, part of their research required clinicians to document the recommendations from the calculator, and then document their reason/s for accepting or rejecting the recommendations.

What’s the bottom line?

In this quality improvement project around implementation of the neonatal sepsis calculator, high uptake was achieved (>95%). In comparision at 4 months pre and post implementation, there was an associated reduction in antibiotic use from 11% to 5%, with blood cultures taken dropping from 14.8% to 7.6% of live births. The neonatal sepsis calculator provides objective data that can be used along with clinical judgement to make decisions about investigations and treatment of EOS. 

Reviewed by: Katie Nash

 

Article 2: To scan or not to scan?

Why does it matter?

With increasing availability and use of imaging over the past 10 years there has been a growing concern regarding the risks of diagnostic ionizing radiation. Previously our data regarding this has been based on studies of atomic bomb survivors from Hirsoshima & Nagasaki. A previous UK cohort study of 170,000 children under 10 undergoing head CT scans showed 1 excess case of leukaemia and 1 excess case of brain cancer for every 10,000 scans performed (Pence 2012).
 

What’s it about?

This was a retrospective population based cohort study of South Korean children (under 19 years of age) who had had a claim made via the National Health Insurance System. From 2006-2015 there were 12,068,821 individuals include. Of these 1,275,829 (10.6%) were exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation (defined as CT and other modalities such as IV urography but not plain X-Rays) with 92% being CT. Any scans performed 2 years before a diagnosis of cancer was excluded as these may well have been performed in the diagnostic evaluation for malignancy.
 
Amongst the entire cohort there were 21,912 cancers detected and this included 1444 cancers amongst those exposed to radiation (0.1%). In the group exposed to low-dose ionizing radiation there was in increased in overall cancer incidence than in the non-exposed group. (Incidence Rate Ratio of 1.64 [95% CI 1.56-173] p<0.001).
 

What’s the bottom line?

This study adds to the evidence that diagnostic ionizing radiation such as CT does increase the risk of cancer. It is import to recognise this risk is small compared to the lifetime risk of cancer but medical practioners should judge carefully the risks and benefits of performing any scan and adhere to the “as low as reasonably achievable” (ALARA) principles (RCR guidelines 2012).
 
Reviewed by: Jamie Pope

 

Article 3: Rotavirus Vaccine Effectiveness in NSW

Maguire J.E et al.  Rotavirus Epidemiology and Monovalent Rotavirus Vaccine Effectiveness in Australia: 2010 – 2017, Pediatrics[Internet]. 2019 Oct;144(4). pii: e20191024. doi: 10.1542/peds.2019-1024. Epub 2019 Sep 17 [cited 2019 Oct 29].

Why does it matter?

Rotavirus gastroenteritis is a frequently encountered and unpleasant illness. In 2007, a monovalent live attenuated vaccine covering for several G1 strains was introduced into the Australian Immunization schedule. Vaccine effectiveness (VE) is the percentage reduction of disease when comparing immunized and unimmunized patients. 3 years after the introduction, hospitalization in children less than 5 years due to rotavirus gastro declined by 71% – so just how effective is the vaccine?

What’s it about?

A retrospective cross-sectional study looked at laboratory confirmed cases of rotavirus in NSW from January 1 st 2010 to December 31 st 2017. A total of 9517 cases were identified, and age, gender, ATSI status, immunization status and rotavirus genotype recorded. VE was calculated based on the 2017 dataset, a year where there was a significant rotavirus gastro outbreak, and looked at children aged 0 – 16 years, born after 2008. It appears that 2 doses of Rotarix are effective, with VE estimates of 88% for the 6 – 11month age group, 83% for the 1 – 3 year old age group and 78% for the 4 – 9 year old age group. It is notable that VE significantly reduced from 89.5% at 1 year post vaccination to 77% at 5-10 years post vaccination.

What’s the clinically relevant bottom line?

The vaccine (Rotarix) appears to be effective, especially in children under 12 months who are exposed to those G1 strains, however the emergence of new strains and the waning immunity with age raises 2 questions: should a new and improved vaccine be developed and do adults (particularly those who work in healthcare) need booster doses?

Reviewed by: Tina Abi Abdallah

 

Article 4:  How well do you know your inhaler technique?

Spaggiari S, Gehri M, Di Benedetto et al. Inhalation technique practical skills and knowledge among physicians and nurses in two pediatric emergency settings. J  Asthma [Internet]. 2019 Oct 17 [cited 2019 Nov 1]. doi: 10.1080/02770903.2019.1674329. [Epub ahead of print]

Why does it matter?

Effective treatment of wheeze requires an appropriate inhalation technique but inhalers are often used incorrectly. Such errors can hinder deposition of the active compound into the lungs, thus diminishing treatment efficiency, which can lead to inadequate treatment or control of the disease. To overcome this problem, the Global Initiative for Asthma report recommend that patients be asked to demonstrate their inhaler device technique at every visit to enable improper use to be corrected and ongoing use technique to be monitored. Unfortunately, many healthcare professionals who are charged with providing instruction and monitoring aimed at optimizing inhaler use are not well versed with the use of these devices themselves.

What’s it about?

The aim of the study was to assess the ability and knowledge of physicians and nurses to use a pMDI with a masked VHC in paediatric emergency units. They conducted a 2 centre observational study, in Switzerland, with a total of 100 participants (50 nurses and 50 physicians). Their inhaler technique instructions were checked using a manikin and were video recorded. Using a 9 point operational checklist the recordings were reviewed and marked by 3 experts in aerosol therapy. The second part of the study evaluated health care professionals inhaler user knowledge by using a semi-structured questionnaire.

49% of the healthcare professionals performed all nine steps of the inhalation technique perfectly, with about a third performing eights steps correctly, and less than a fifth performing five, six, or seven steps correctly. The most frequent errors were forgetting to shake the pMDI before the second dose and incorrect patient or VHC positioning.

 

Site 1 (Lausanne)

Site 2 (Geneva)

Nurse

Doctors

Mean Sore

(Range)

8.6

(7-9)

8.0

(5-9)

8.6

(7-9)

8.0

(5-9)

Only 18% of physicians and 64% of nurses reported having had specific training on inhalation technique. A notable portion of the healthcare professionals lacked practical knowledge about pMDI and VHC use. Differences between sites, professions and grades were statistically significant but probably not clinically relevant. The mean score being 8.3 (out of 9) and differences between groups being no more than 0.6 (Nurses performed better than  Doctors, Registered Nurses better than  nurses with a diploma in emergency care but there was no difference between junior and senior doctors)

This study has several limitations. Participants were recruited during their work time. Thus, it is possible that their inhalation technique and survey responses were influenced by stress. On the other hand, the participants may have exhibited better performance because they knew that the study was underway and that they were being observed (Hawthorne effect).

Healthcare professionals’ practical skills and knowledge related to inhalation therapy were not completely mastered. In light of their results, they provided information to participating healthcare professionals to help them observe good practices and provide suitable inhalation technique support.

What’s the bottom line?

Overall this study demonstrates that some professionals lack knowledge on inhaler technique which could lead to ineffective administration of medication to children with wheeze. It is recommended that health care professionals receive brief repeated training programmes on inhaler technique to provide optimal advice to patients. Do you know how good your unit’s education of inhaler technique is?

Reviewed by: Suzannah Johnson

 

Article 5: Is there a link between shorter sleep in infancy and becoming more overweight later?

Tuohino T et al. Short Sleep Duration and Later Overweight in Infants. J Paediatr [Internet]. 2019 Sep [cited 2019 Nov 4];212:13-19. doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2019.05.041. 

What’s it about?

The longitudinal study examined the relationship between sleep duration and excess weight gain in infants. Sleep data (N=1679) was reported by parents at 3, 8, 18 and 24 months of age in Finland from 2011 to 2017. In 3-month-old infants, short sleep is associated with lower weight-for-length/height (p≤0.026) and body mass index (p≤0.038). Short sleep duration in 3-month-old infants was associated with greater risk for excess weight-for-length/height at 24-month-old (aOR 1.56; 95% CI 1.02- 2.38) and a predisposition to gain excess weight between 3 and 24-month-old (aOR 2.61; 95% CI 1.75-3.91). Short night-time sleep duration in 8-month-old infants was associated with greater weight-for-length at 24-month-old (aOR 1.51; 95% CI 1.02-2.33)

Why does it matter?

Numerous factors contribute to the obesity epidemic in children, such as sedentary behaviour and the increasing use of electronic devices. Previous studies have explored potential mechanisms for infant weight gain, which include parental obesity and feeding practices. Studies have associated short sleep with a heavier weight profile in older children and adults, although negative results also have been reported.

What’s the bottom line?

Short total sleep duration at 3 months and short night-time sleep duration at 8 months are associated with the risk of gaining excess weight at 24 months. Sleep is important for child growth and development. To prevent the childhood obesity epidemic in the future, parents are encouraged to be aware of their child’s circadian rhythm, bedtime routines and sleep hygiene.

Reviewed by: Jessica Wong

 

If we have missed out on something useful or you think other articles are absolutely worth sharing, please add them in the comments! We are also looking to expand the Bubble Wrap team so please contact us if you’re interested in this! That’s it for this month. Many thanks to all of our reviewers who have taken the time to scour the literature so you don’t have to. 

Bubble Wrap PLUS – September 2019

Cite this article as:
Anke Raaijmakers. Bubble Wrap PLUS – September 2019, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.21266

Here is September’s Bubble Wrap Plus, our monthly paediatric Journal Club List provided by Professor Jaan Toelen & his team of the University Hospitals in Leuven (Belgium). This comprehensive list of ‘articles to read’ comes from 34 journals, including Pediatrics, The Journal of Pediatrics, Archives of Disease in Childhood, JAMA Pediatrics, Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, NEJM, and many more.

This month’s list features answers to intriguing questions such as: ‘When may influenza lead to severe pneumonia?’, ‘Do IVF babies have an abnormal vascular health?’, ‘Should we have a talk with our anesthesiologists about prolonged fasting in pediatric anesthesia?’, ‘Is there an association between UTIs and renal scarring?’ and ‘Prednisolone or Dexamethasone, which one is best for Croup?’.

You will find the list is broken down into four sections:

1.Reviews and opinion articles

Social media and children: what is the paediatrician’s role?

Hadjipanayis A, et al. Eur J Pediatr. 2019 Aug 30.

Ultrafine particles and children’s health: Literature review.

da Costa E Oliveira JR, et al. Paediatr Respir Rev. 2019 Jun 26.

An introduction to clinical trial design.

Schultz A, et al. Paediatr Respir Rev. 2019 Jun 26.

Janus looks both ways: How do the upper and lower airways interact?

de Benedictis FM, et al. Paediatr Respir Rev. 2019 Jun 26.

Decision-making for pediatric allergy immunotherapy for aeroallergens: a narrative review.

Tortajada-Girbés M, et al. Eur J Pediatr. 2019 Aug 14.

Leaving me speechless: how an early encounter with a doctor influenced my work as a paediatrician.

[No authors listed] Arch Dis Child. 2019 Aug 13.

Does It Matter if This Baby Is 22 or 23 Weeks?

Janvier A, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Sep;144(3).

Walking on Eggshells With Trainees in the Clinical Learning Environment-Avoiding the Eggshells Is Not the Answer.

Gold MA, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 Aug 5.

Abdominal ultrasound should become part of standard care for early diagnosis and management of necrotising enterocolitis: a narrative review.

van Druten J, et al. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2019 Sep;104(5):F551-F559.

2. Original clinical studies

Risk Factors for Influenza Virus Related Severe Lower Respiratory Tract Infection in Children.

Eşki A, et al. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 Aug 27.

Timing of voiding cystourethrography after febrile urinary tract infection in children: a systematic review.

Mazzi S, et al. Arch Dis Child. 2019 Aug 29.

Physical activity, fatigue and sleep quality at least 6 months after mild traumatic brain injury in adolescents and young adults: A comparison with orthopedic injury controls.

van Markus-Doornbosch F, et al. Eur J Paediatr Neurol. 2019 Aug 9.

Incidence of epilepsy in children born prematurely and small for gestational age at term gestation: A population-based cohort study.

Chou IC, et al. J Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Aug 28.

Prenatal Opioid Exposure: Neurodevelopmental Consequences and Future Research Priorities.

Conradt E, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Sep;144(3).

Enterovirus, parechovirus, adenovirus and herpes virus type 6 viraemia in fever without source.

L’Huillier AG, et al. Arch Dis Child. 2019 Aug 28.

Frequency of urinary tract infection in children with antenatal diagnosis of urinary tract dilatation.

Pennesi M, et al. Arch Dis Child. 2019 Aug 28.

Electronic Nicotine Delivery Systems Marketing and Initiation Among Youth and Young Adults.

Loukas A, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Sep;144(3).

Prenatal paracetamol exposure and neurodevelopmental outcomes in preschool-aged children.

Trønnes JN, et al. Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2019 Aug 25.

Two new chest compression methods might challenge the standard in a simulated infant model.

Rodriguez-Ruiz E, et al. Eur J Pediatr. 2019 Aug 24.

Can intussusceptions of small bowel and colon be transient? A prospective study.

Wang Q, et al. Eur J Pediatr. 2019 Aug 24.

Effects of Childhood and Adult Persistent Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder on Risk of Motor Vehicle Crashes: Results From the Multimodal Treatment Study of ADHD.

Roy A, et al. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2019 Aug 22.

Should we look for Hirschsprung disease in all children with meconium plug syndrome?

Buonpane C, et al. J Pediatr Surg. 2019 Jun;54(6):1164-1167.

Necrotizing enterocolitis in term neonates: A different disease process?

Overman RE Jr, et al. J Pediatr Surg. 2019 Jun;54(6):1143-1146.

Digital Phenotyping With Mobile and Wearable Devices: Advanced Symptom Measurement in Child and Adolescent Depression.

Sequeira L, et al. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2019 Sep;58(9):841-845.

Vascular Health of Children Conceived via In Vitro Fertilization.

Zhang WY, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Aug 20. pii: S0022-3476(19)30885-6.

Symptom Burden and Quality of Life Over Time in Pediatric Eosinophilic Esophagitis.

Klinnert MD, et al. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2019 Aug 20.

Real fasting times and incidence of pulmonary aspiration in children: Results of a German prospective multicenter observational study.

Beck CE, et al. Paediatr Anaesth. 2019 Aug 22.

Reducing Variability in the Infant Sepsis Evaluation (REVISE): A National Quality Initiative.

Biondi EA, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Sep;144(3).

An End in Sight: Shorter Duration of Parenteral Antibiotics in Neonates.

Leva NV, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Sep;144(3).

Parenteral Antibiotic Therapy Duration in Young Infants With Bacteremic Urinary Tract Infections.

Desai S, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Sep;144(3).

Impact of an Antibiotic Stewardship Program on Antibiotic Prescription for Acute Respiratory Tract Infections in Children: A Prospective Before-After Study.

Aoybamroong N, et al. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2019 Aug 20:9922819870248.

Long-term vs. recent-onset obesity: their contribution to cardiometabolic risk in adolescence.

Burrows R, et al. Pediatr Res. 2019 Aug 19.

Environmental determinants associated with acute otitis media in children: a longitudinal study.

van Ingen G, et al. Pediatr Res. 2019 Aug 17.

Prednisolone Versus Dexamethasone for Croup: a Randomized Controlled Trial.

Parker CM, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Sep;144(3).

Maternal Voice and Infant Sleep in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

Shellhaas RA, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Sep;144(3).

Childhood Facial Palsy: Etiologic Factors and Clinical Findings, an Observational Retrospective Study.

Hanci F, et al. J Child Neurol. 2019 Aug 13:883073819865682.

Association Between Electronic Cigarette Use and Marijuana Use Among Adolescents and Young Adults: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

Chadi N, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 Aug 12:e192574.

Association of Cereal, Gluten, and Dietary Fiber Intake With Islet Autoimmunity and Type 1 Diabetes.

Hakola L, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 Aug 12.

Shared Reading at Age 1 Year and Later Vocabulary: A Gene-Environment Study.

Jimenez ME, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Aug 8.

Cost-Effectiveness of Screening Ultrasound after a First, Febrile Urinary Tract Infection in Children Age 2-24 Months.

Gaither TW, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Aug 8.

Use of paediatric early warning scores in intermediate care units.

Lampin ME, et al. Arch Dis Child. 2019 Aug 10.

How Much Is Too Much? Examining the Relationship Between Digital Screen Engagement and Psychosocial Functioning in a Confirmatory Cohort Study.

Przybylski AK, et al. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2019 Aug 7.

Delivery Room Continuous Positive Airway Pressure and Pneumothorax.

Smithhart W, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Sep;144(3). pii: e20190756.

Understanding the Risks and Benefits of Delivery Room CPAP for Term Infants.

Claassen CC, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Sep;144(3).

Quality of Life in Children with Functional Constipation: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Vriesman MH, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Aug 6.

Testing for Meningitis in Febrile Well-Appearing Young Infants With a Positive Urinalysis.

Wang ME, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Sep;144(3).

Undifferentiated Abdominal Pain in Children Presenting to the Pediatric Emergency Department.

Harris BR, et al. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2019 Aug 6:9922819867459.

Association Between Recurrent Febrile Urinary Tract Infections and Renal Scarring: From Unquestioned Answers to Unanswered Questions.

Roberts KB. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 Aug 5.

Association of Renal Scarring With Number of Febrile Urinary Tract Infections in Children.

Shaikh N, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 Aug 5.

Use of high-flow nasal cannula in infants with viral bronchiolitis outside pediatric intensive care units.

Panciatici M, et al. Eur J Pediatr. 2019 Aug 1.

Association of Gluten Intake During the First 5 Years of Life With Incidence of Celiac Disease Autoimmunity and Celiac Disease Among Children at Increased Risk.

Andrén Aronsson C, et al. JAMA. 2019 Aug 13;322(6):514-523.

4. Case reports

Superior mesenteric artery syndrome mimicking cyclic vomiting syndrome in a healthy 12-year-old boy.

Dimopoulou A, et al. J Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Aug 13.

An 8-year-old boy with ataxia and abnormal movements.

Hanes I, et al. Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Aug;24(5):297-298.

A 10-year-old boy with fever, arthritis, and a painful rash.

Erdle SC, et al. Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Aug;24(5):295-296.

Abdominal Pain and Intermittent Fevers in a 16-Year-Old Girl.

Penberthy K, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Sep;144(3).

Case 27-2019: A 16-Year-Old Girl with Head Trauma during a Sailboat Race.

Iaccarino MA, et al. N Engl J Med. 2019 Aug 29;381(9):863-871.

Mittens and Booties Syndrome: A Unique Manifestation of Human Parechovirus Infection in Infants.

Ristagno EH, et al. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 Sep;38(9):e223-e225.

 

If we have missed out on something useful or you think other articles are absolutely worth sharing, please add them in the comments!

The 33rd Bubble Wrap

Cite this article as:
Grace Leo. The 33rd Bubble Wrap, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.21262

Article 1: More evidence for lower dexamethasone dosing in croup

Parker C, Cooper M. Prednisolone Versus Dexamethasone for Croup: a Randomized Controlled Trial. Pediatrics. 2019; 144(3):e20183772 

Why does it matter?

There is a lack of data comparing prednisolone and low-dose dexamethasone for the treatment of childhood croup. Early trials have shown the safety and efficacy of 0.6mg/kg of oral dexamethasone and there have been some studies showing potential efficacy of 0.3mg/kg and 0.15mg/kg dosing. These  studies however have not been adequately powered to detect clinical significance.  It is known that 1mg/kg of prednisolone is effective in croup patients requiring intubation and shortens the time to extubation for patients with croup in intensive care1.

What’s it about?

A prospective, double-blind, noninferiority randomised controlled trial was conducted over two urban emergency centres in Perth, Australia. 1252 children >6 months old, and <20kg with croup were randomised to oral dexamethasone (0.6mg/kg; n=410), low-dose dexamethasone (0.15mg/kg; n=410), or oral prednisolone (1mg/kg; n= 411).  

The Westley Croup Score (WCS), a clinical score based on stridor, retractions, air entry and level of consciousness was assessed at baseline, and then hourly up to 6 hours, and again at 12 hours, if the patients were not yet discharged.  Results showed no statistically significant difference between the 3 groups for the WCS at the 1-hour assessment: 0.03 (95% CI- 0.09 to 0.15; p=0.62) for low-dose dexamethasone and 0.05 (95% CI -0.07 to 0.17; p=0.40) for prednisolone.  Both of these groups fell within the prescribed noninferiority margin of 0.5.  Interestingly, WCS for low-dose dexamethasone was 0.11 higher at 2 hours and 0.23 higher at 3 hours compared to 0.6mg/kg dexamethasone group.  The difference was significant at 3 hours (p=0.04), however, the upper limit of 95% CI (0.45) was within the noninferiority margin. Authors propose that the “ceiling effect,”theory, where steroid effect above a certain threshold does not have additional benefit, may be at a dose higher than 0.15mg/kg for a minority of patients. 

Re-attendance rates (to GP and ED) within 7 days after treatment were 17.8% for 0.6mg/kg dexamethasone, 19.5% (p=0.59) for low-dose dexamethasone and 21.7% (p=0.19) for prednisolone. 

Clinically Relevant Bottom Line

Noninferiority was demonstrated for both low-dose dexamethasone (0.15mg/kg) and single dose prednisolone (1mg/kg) compared with 0.6mg/kg dexamethasone. There was no clinically significant difference on efficacy in the acute period, as well as re-attendance rates to both GP and ED.  

Reviewed by: Lorraine Cheung

1.   Tibballs J, Shann FA, Landau LI. Placebo-controlled trial of prednisolone in children intubated for croup. Lancet. 1992:340 (8822): 745-748

2.   Geelhoed GC, Macdonald WB. Oral dexamethasone in the treatment of croup: 0.15mg/kg versus 0.3mg/kg versus 0.6mg/kg. Paediatric Pulmonology. 1995;20(6):362-368 

 

Article 2: The dangers of VALI (not the son of Loki)  

Ween MP, Hamon R, Macowan MG, Thredgold L, Reynolds PR, Hodge SJ. Effects of E cigarette E liquid components on bronchial epithelial cells: Demonstration of dysfunctional efferocytosis, Respirology. 2019 Sep 22. doi: 10.1111/resp.13696 [Epub ahead of print]

Why does it matter?

The e-cigarette was released in 2003, being marketed as safer for smokers and everyone around them. The use and popularity amongst adolescents continues to rise, despite new information about Vaping Associated Lung Injury (VALI), as well as injuries related to malfunctioning devices. In Australia, e-cigarettes containing nicotine liquid have been banned, but the base composition of a fruit flavour, vegetable glycerine (VG) and propylene glycol (PG) may still have harmful effects.

What’s it about?

An in vitro study which compared the effects of cigarette smoke extract to apple flavoured E liquid and nicotine (in a VG and PG base). The authors looked at cytokine release, cell necrosis, apoptosis and efferocytosis in healthy bronchial epithelial cells.

The results show that all individually (glycol bases alone, apple flavouring alone, nicotine alone) and combination (apple + nicotine) had significant toxic effects, when compared with the control of cigarette smoke extract. E cigarette components caused apoptosis and necrosis, reduced efferocytosis by down regulation of receptors, and reduced the production of certain inflammatory cytokines.

Clinically Relevant Bottom Line

To the surprise of nobody, e-cigarettes are not harmless. Ongoing research into the effects of first hand and second hand E- Cigarettes vapour, both containing nicotine and nicotine free, will be crucial in determining new policies and regulations, especially to curb the rise of use amongst our young population.

Reviewed by: Tina Abi Abdallah

 

Article 3:  Optimal fasting regimens – what does the evidence suggest?

Real fasting times and incidence of pulmonary aspiration in children: Results of a German prospective multicenter observational study. Beck et al. Paediatr Anaesth. 2019 Aug 22.

What’s it about?

Unfortunately, prolonged fasting times before a general anaesthesia is still common in paediatrics. The authors of this article hypothesised that shortened fasting times could improve the child’s condition during induction of anaesthesia and improve children’s and parental satisfaction. This prospective observational study in Germany looked at real fasting times and proposed reduced fasting times, but an (adapted) national guideline is lacking. Over 3000 children were included at 10 paediatric centres in Germany. Surprisingly, the real fasting times were 14 hours for large meals, 9 hours for light meals, 6 hours for formula, 5 hours breast milk and 3 hours for clear fluids. The authors report a prolonged fasting (defined as over 2 hours deviation from guideline) for large meals in 88%, for light meals in 55%, for formula milk in 44%, for breast milk in 26% and for clear fluids in 34%.

Eleven cases (0.33%) of regurgitation, four cases (0.12%) of suspected pulmonary aspiration and two cases (0.06%) of confirmed pulmonary aspiration were reported, without any prolonged anaesthetic.

Why does it matter?

Children having an anaesthetic should not be fasted longer than necessary as this negatively impacts tolerability of the child, the parents and their environment. This study shows that prolonged fasting is very common, from large meals to clear fluids. All cases could be extubated after the end of the procedure and recovered without any incidents which may suggest we are too strict with our fasting times.

Clinically Relevant Bottom Line

This study shows that prolonged fasting is still common in paediatric anaesthesia and that complications related to not fasting are rare and that improvements to current local fasting regimens and national fasting guidelines are urgently needed. Short fasting guidelines for children could potentially improve anaesthetic tolerance and satisfaction.

Reviewed by: Anke Raaijmakers

 

Article 4:  Family Chaos and Asthma Control

Weinstein SM, Pugach O, Rosales G, Mosnaim GS, Walton SM, Marin MA. Family Chaos and Asthma Control. Paediatrics. 2019. Aug;144(2). doi: 10.1542/peds.2018-2758. Epub 2019 Jul 9.

What’s it about?

This cohort study focused on 223 children (5 to 16 years-old) of low-income minority background with poorly-controlled asthma in the United States.  The study explored the relationship between asthma severity and psychosocial factors such as parental and child depression, post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and family functioning.    Both parents and children showed higher rates of depression and PTSD symptoms compared to the general population. Parental and child depression symptoms were associated with poor asthma control, asthma severity and limitations of activity (P<0.001). PTSD symptoms were unrelated to child asthma outcomes. Family chaos serve as a predictor of poor asthma outcomes and a mediator for the relationship between parental depression and child asthma (P<0.05).  

Why does it matter?

Previous studies have shown a high prevalence of poorly-controlled asthma among school-aged children (6 to 17 years old). Studies have found increased rates of parental depression and anxiety, associated with poor child asthma outcome. Child depression and anxiety symptoms are predictors of poor asthma outcomes, including increased functional impairment, asthma severity and frequency of emotional triggers.

Clinically Relevant Bottom Line

Child and parent depression and family chaos are predictors of uncontrolled asthma. Family chaos also serves as the mediator between parent depression and asthma outcomes. To optimise asthma care, measures to screen youth and parent depression in community settings should be made aware and become part of the clinical guideline.

Reviewed by: Jessica Wong

 

Article 5:  Mother knows best?

Vanderkooi OG, Xie J, Lee BE, Pang X, Chui L, Payne DC et al. on behalf of Alberta Provincial Pediatric EnTeric Infection TEam (APPETITE) and Pediatric Emergency Research Canada (PERC). A prospective comparative study of children with gastroenteritis: emergency department compared with symptomatic care at home . Eur J Clin Microbiol Infect Dis. 2019 Sep 9. doi: 10.1007/s10096-019-03688-8. [Epub ahead of print]

What’s it about?

The “apple juice” paper highlighted that treatment of gastroenteritis can be simple but led many to question why some of the children recruited needed any formal fluid trials at all. This study by the same author (Stephen Freedman) was designed to compare the treatment and outcomes of children with gastroenteritis seen in the Emergency Department with those who were managed at home.

The recruitment strategy was dependent on a national helpline, those in the UK will know this as similar to 111, which triages and directs parents to call to either self-care at home or suggest onward referral.

A cohort of patients presenting to the Emergency Department with gastroenteritis (1317 children, median age 20.8 months) were compared with those who were managed at home (296 children, median age 17.4 months). The groups were essentially similar (both had a high rate of having a rectal swab for bacteria.viruses performed, in the ‘at home’ cohort this was taken by the parents).

Isolated vomiting was higher in the ED group but isolated diarrhea more frequent at the home cohort. While the median dehydration scores in the ED (3 IQR 2-4) were significantly different from at home (1 IQR 0-2) the clinical significance is not clear as both would rank as ‘some dehydration’ and the scale goes up to 8.

Why does it matter?

This could have been a ‘so-what’ study. You would expect that a group of children presenting to an ED with symptoms of gastroenteritis would vomit more than those staying at home and would be more clinically dehydrated. However this study again shows how minor dehydration generally is with gastroenteritis and how isolated vomiting causes concern in parents. Of most interest was over 35% of the at home group had norvovirus. This means if we can direct public health efforts to further educating parents on managing gastroenteritis it is possible we can further safely reduce ED attendance.

Clinically Relevant Bottom Line

Children are more unwell with gastroenteritis if their parents choose to bring them to hospital. But not by a massive amount and they do successfully look after children with infections often associated with need for admission.

Reviewed by: Damian Roland

 

If we have missed out on something useful or you think other articles are absolutely worth sharing, please add them in the comments! We are also looking to expand the Bubble Wrap team so please contact us if you’re interested in this! That’s it for this month. Many thanks to all of our reviewers who have taken the time to scour the literature so you don’t have to. 

The 32nd Bubble Wrap

Cite this article as:
Grace Leo. The 32nd Bubble Wrap, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.20763

 

Article 1: Should we worry about fever after Meningococcal B immunisations?

Campbell G, Bland RM, Hendry SJ. Fever after meningococcal B immunisation: A case series. J Paediatr Child Health. 2019; 55: 932-937. doi:10.1111/jpc.14315

Why does it matter?

Meningococcal meningitis and septicaemia remain is one of the most serious bacterial infections (SBI). In Australia, the government subsidised vaccine schedule includes Meningococcal ACWY however Meningococcal B vaccine (Bexsero) can be purchased ($250-$500) for children 6 weeks to 11 years. It is an immunogenic vaccine, and paracetamol is recommended on the day of immunisation, but how can we be sure the fever is due to the infection and not something more sinister?

What’s it about?

A prospective case series from the ED at Royal Hospital for Children, Glasgow was performed on patients presenting between 2016-17. They identified 92 eligible infants under 3 months presenting with fever within 72 hours of Bexsero immunisations. The youngest infant was 7 weeks old.

Of these patients, 76 infants were discharged within 24 hours with majority undergoing at least one investigation (FBC, CRP, Urine MCS, NPA). Only 16 children of the 66 admitted remained in hospital for > 24 hours, with 12 undergoing an LP and completing 48 hours of IV antibiotics.

In this study, 26 children had an NPA performed with 12 positive for at least 1 virus, and one child represented with bronchiolitis.

Only one child in the cohort had SBI with an E.coli UTI. This infant also had a significantly elevated CRP and WCC compared with the other patients, and their fever started 54 hours after immunisation. The remainder had negative CSF, urine and blood cultures.

Clinically Relevant Bottom Line

Fever in the first 24 hours following the 2 month Meningococcal B vaccine is expected, and depending on the clinical exam and partial septic work up results, may be discharged home with reassurance. The key is to always be weary of the unwell looking infant and those whose fevers persist, as a full septic work up and IV antibiotics should be considered.

Reviewed by: Tina Abi Abdallah

 

Article 2:  Does iron fortified formula for Infants make a difference?

Gahagan S, et al. Randomized Controlled Trial of Iron-Fortified versus Low-Iron Infant Formula: Developmental Outcomes at 16 Years. The Journal of Pediatrics. 2019 June [epub] doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2019.05.030

Why does it matter?

Iron deficiency anaemia in infancy has long-term effects on the developing brain.  It is the most common nutrition disorder in the world.  Therefore, many countries routinely supplement infant formula with iron.  Recommendations for iron concentrations in infant formulas differ between guidelines, ranging from 4-12mg/L.Australian formulas generally contain between 6.7-9 mg/L.  There has been no study comparing the effects of iron-fortified formula vs low-iron formula on cognitive outcomes. 

What’s it about? 

Six-month old infants who did not have iron deficiency anaemia, were recruited from community clinics in Santiago, Chile.  They were randomised to iron-fortified (12mg/L) or low-iron (2.3mg/L) formula for 6 months and were followed-up at 16 years of age.  Of the 405 participants, those who randomised to iron-fortified formula (n=216) had lower scores than those randomised to low-iron formula (n=189) in 8 of the 9 tests.  Three of the 8 were statistically significant, and were in the domains of visual memory (p=0.02), arithmetic achievement (p=0.02) and reading comprehension achievement (p=0.02).  For visual motor integration, it was found that those with low haemoglobin at 6-months of age who received iron-fortified formula, outperformed those with low-iron formula.  The opposite was also true, with those with high haemoglobin at 6 months, receiving iron-fortification underperforming those with low-iron formula.  Animal studies have shown concern regarding the possibility of iron neurotoxicity in the growing infant, as well as the effects of iron exposure in early life on brain aging and neurodegenerative disease outcomes.

Clinically Relevant Bottom Line

This study from Chile suggests that  adolescents who received iron-fortified formula as infants from 6 to 12 months of age had poorer cognitive outcomes compared with those who received a low-iron formula. This could be related to iron neurotoxicity and there is a need for further studies to investigate the optimal level of iron supplementation in infancy.  Although on a public health level it may not be feasible, it may be ideal to individualise the optimal amount of iron for supplementation based on baseline haemoglobin or iron measures. 

Reviewed by: Lorraine Cheung

  1. American Academy of Pediatrics Committee on Nutrition recommends 10-12mg/L from birth. European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition recommends 4-7 mg/L.

 

Article 3: Introducing paediatric procedural sedation in low-resource countries

Schultz, M & Niescierenko, M. Guidance for Implementing Pediatric Procedural Sedation in Resource-Limited Settings. Clinical Pediatric Emergency Medicine, 2019 In Press; doi: 10.1016/j.cpem.2019.06.004

Why does it matter?

Since its introduction, much research has demonstrated the safety and benefit of paediatric procedural sedation (when used with the proper monitoring). The benefits of procedural sedation include reduced procedure time and error rates; increased comfort of patients, parents and health care professionals; and reduced need for general anaesthesia for minor procedures. While paediatric procedural sedation is part of routine practice in high-income countries (HIC), it is almost non-existent in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC). The paper claims this is mainly due to a lack of skilled providers, not for lack of need. Providing proper clinical training to health providers in LMIC would help provide safe and adequate analgesia for children undergoing minor procedures.

What’s it about?

The authors of the paper have devised a paediatric procedural sedation curriculum, which was piloted at John F. Kennedy Hospital in Monrovia, Liberia. The pilot curriculum focuses solely on the use of ketamine, as it is cheap, widely available in Africa, has multiple routes of administration and is safe for use in children. The curriculum also allows for a single-practitioner method of procedural sedation, which is key in LMIC where there are limited number of health providers compared to the patient load. The curriculum is divided in three 2-hour sessions which consist of (1) introduction to procedural sedation, (2) resuscitation and management of adverse effect, and (3) monitoring and conclusion. All required teaching supplies were restricted to printed handouts, poster paper, markers and low-fidelity simulation equipment, thus eliminating the need for computers, software and electricity. Participants of this curriculum were 15 paediatric and surgical residents.

Clinically relevant bottom line

I was  fascinated with how the authors came up with this pilot curriculum for the Liberian hospital. Not only did they have to think about the costs of the individual piece of equipment in the sedation kit, but they also took into consideration the variable availability of electricity, the type of possible monitoring during sedation, and the scarcity of personnel. Too often we forget how lucky we are to have access to so many resources! The rollout of safe and routine paediatric procedural sedation is ongoing in Liberia and this is an initial step toward enabling safe procedural sedation for children living in LMIC.

Reviewed by: Jennifer Moon

 

Article 4: Supporting parents to CEASE smoking

Nabi-Burza E, Drehmer JE, Hipple Walters B, et al. Treating Parents for Tobacco Use in the Pediatric Setting: The Clinical Effort Against Secondhand Smoke Exposure Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial. JAMA Pediatr. Published online August 12, 2019. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2019.2639

Why does it matter?

Exposure of children to secondhand and even thirdhand smoke (from toxins absorbed in clothing, carseats) is a serious public health issue. Smoke from cigarette smoke contains about 4000 chemicals, over 50 of which are known carcinogens. Second hand smoke increases the risk of children having SIDS, ear and respiratory infections, asthma exacerbations and teeth problems.

What’s it about?
The CEASE intervention (Clinical Effort Against Secondhand Smoke Exposure Cluster Randomized Clinical Trial) was developed between the AAP  and Massachusetts Tobacco Cessation and Prevention Program, and the Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Child and Adolescent Health Research and Policy. It focuses on 3 of the 5 As of tobacco cessation – Ask, Assist and Arrange Follow Up.

In this cluster RCT study run by the AAP, the CEASE intervention was delivered in paediatric clinics in 5 American states. The CEASE intervention included a smart tablet questionnaire, educational pamphlets and aids and training for staff to help screen for tobacco use and offer treatment to parents. Treatments were referral to a Quitline and/or provision of nicotine replacement therapy.
The study looked at the effectiveness and sustainability of this CEASE intervention 2 weeks and 2 years post start of intervention.

In a population of 8184 parents screened, 27.1% in the intervention group and 23.9% in the control group were smokers. Engagement in a treatment practice was 44.3% in the group vs 0.1% in the control. In the 2 year follow up of 9794 parents screened, 24.4% and   of the parents were smoking in the intervention and control practices respectively. There was a reduction in smoking prevalence in the intervention practices of 2.7% compared to an increase of 1.1% in the usual care control group. The NNT to treat to reduce one smoker was 27 individuals. For confirmed cessation (saliva tested, at least quit for 1 week), the NNT was 18.

The bottom line

We might take a smoking history routinely, but how often do we reach the next step of advising or assisting parents to quit? This trial shows that simple interventions can help improve uptake of treatment. Every parent who quits is one less child exposed to dangerous chemicals from tobacco smoke. The CEASE resources are freely available for use and adaptation https://www.massgeneral.org/children/cease-tobacco So why not move from contemplation to action and take the time to adopt a meaningful change in your own practice? There’s help on hand and it may be easier than you think to start!

Reviewed by: Grace Leo

 

If we have missed out on something useful or you think other articles are absolutely worth sharing, please add them in the comments! We are also looking to expand the Bubble Wrap team so please contact us if you’re interested in this! That’s it for this month. Many thanks to all of our reviewers who have taken the time to scour the literature so you don’t have to. 

Bumper Bubble Wrap PLUS – July/August 2019

Cite this article as:
Anke Raaijmakers. Bumper Bubble Wrap PLUS – July/August 2019, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.20544

Here is our latest Bumper BubbleWrap Plus, combining July’s and August’s paediatric Journal Club Lists provided by Professor Jaan Toelen & his team of the University Hospitals in Leuven (Belgium). This comprehensive list of ‘articles to read’ from the last two months comes from 34 journals, including Pediatrics, The Journal of Pediatrics, Archives of Disease in Childhood, JAMA Pediatrics, Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, NEJM, and many more. This list features answers to intriguing questions such as: ‘Which oxygen saturation leads to ROP?’, ‘How much do parents actually use their smartphones?’, ‘Does teaching of parents lead to less urine contamination rates?’ and ‘Is delayed cord clamping beneficial in elective caesarians?’. We hope you enjoy it!

You will find the list is broken down into four sections:

1.Reviews and opinion articles

Debate: Are Stimulant Medications for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Effective in the Long-Term?

Cortese S, et al. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2019 Jun 26

Continuous Noninvasive Carbon Dioxide Monitoring in Neonates: From Theory to Standard of Care.

Hochwald O, et al.Pediatrics. 2019 Jun 27.

Hyperinsulinaemic hypoglycaemia-an overview of a complex clinical condition.

Kostopoulou E, et al.Eur J Pediatr. 2019 Jun 26.

Food allergy desensitisation: a hard nut to crack?

Chong KW, et al.Arch Dis Child. 2019 Jun 26.

The two extremes meet: pediatricians, geriatricians and the life-course approach.

Cesari M, et al.Pediatr Res. 2019 Jun 25.

What I Learned From My Childhood as a Patient: Internalized Messages About Bodies.

Robertson AD. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 Jun 24

Group B Streptococcus: Trials and Tribulations.

Davies HG, et al. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 Jun;38(6S Suppl 1):S72-S76

Parasites in Human Stool: To Ignore or Not To Ignore?

Butters C, et al.Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 Jun;38(6S Suppl 1):S47-S51.

Dilemmas With Rotavirus Vaccine: The Neonate and Immunocompromised.

Chiu M, et al.Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 Jun;38(6S Suppl 1):S43-S46.

To LP or not to LP? Identifying the Etiology of Pediatric Meningitis.

Mijovic H, et al.Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 Jun;38(6S Suppl 1):S39-S42

Viral Bacterial Interactions in Children: Impact on Clinical Outcomes.

Diaz-Diaz A, et al.Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 Jun;38(6S Suppl 1):S14-S19.

Biomarkers for Infection in Children: Current Clinical Practice and Future Perspectives.

Stol K, et al.Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 Jun;38(6S Suppl 1):S7-S13.

Innate immunity and urinary tract infection.

Ching C, et al.Pediatr Nephrol. 2019 Jun 13

Stranded on Antipsychotics: Role of the Pediatric Clinician.

Ballard R, et al.Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2019 Jun 10:9922819853774

Update on adrenal steroid hormone biosynthesis and clinical implications.

Bacila IA, et al.Arch Dis Child. 2019 Jun 7.

Stimulating and maintaining spontaneous breathing during transition of preterm infants.

Dekker J, et al.Pediatr Res. 2019 Jun 19.

School Readiness.

Williams PG, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Jul 22.

Controversies Surrounding the Pathophysiology of Tics.

Singer HS, et al. J Child Neurol. 2019 Jul 18:883073819862121.

Viral hepatitis.

Hardikar W. J Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Jul 17.

Two centuries of immunisation in the UK (part 1).

Lang S, et al. Arch Dis Child. 2019 Jul 4.

Two centuries of immunisation in the UK (part II).

Lang S, et al. Arch Dis Child. 2019 Jul 13.

Family Chaos and Asthma Control.

Weinstein SM, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Jul 9.

Torsion of an Undescended Testis – A Surgical Pediatric Emergency.

Kargl S, et al. J Pediatr Surg. 2019 Jun 28.

Less invasive surfactant administration (LISA): chances and limitations.

Herting E, et al. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2019 Jul 11.

2. Original clinical studies

Randomized Controlled Trial of Iron-Fortified versus Low-Iron Infant Formula: Developmental Outcomes at 16 Years.

Gahagan S, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Jun 25.

Benefits of medical clowning in the treatment of young children with autism spectrum disorder.

Shefer S, et al.Eur J Pediatr. 2019 Jun 26.

Social Robots for Hospitalized Children.

Logan DE, et al.Pediatrics. 2019 Jun 26.

Tic Suppression in Children With Recent-Onset Tics Predicts 1-Year Tic Outcome.

Kim S, et al.J Child Neurol. 2019 Jun 26:883073819855531.

Delays in diagnosis of nephrotic syndrome in children: A survey study.

Hollis A, et al.Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Jul;24(4):258-262.

Shared decision making during antenatal counselling for anticipated extremely preterm birth.

Barker C, et al.Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Jul;24(4):240-249.

Parental preferences on diagnostic imaging tests for paediatric appendicitis.

Martinez-Rios C, et al.Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Jul;24(4):234-239

Neurologic Outcome After Prematurity: Perspectives of Parents and Clinicians.

Lemmon ME, et al.Pediatrics. 2019 Jun 27.

Development of the Serum α-Fetoprotein Reference Range in Patients with Beckwith-Wiedemann Spectrum.

Duffy KA, et al.J Pediatr. 2019 Jun 21

Positional plagiocephaly/brachycephaly is associated with later cognitive and academic outcomes.

Knight S. J Pediatr. 2019 Jul;210:239-242.

Confidentiality in the Doctor-Patient Relationship: Perspectives of Youth Ages 14-24 Years.

Zucker NA, et al.J Pediatr. 2019 Jun 20.

Characteristics Associated with Successful Weight Management in Youth with Obesity.

Gorecki MC, et al.J Pediatr. 2019 Jun 20.

Achieved oxygen saturations and retinopathy of prematurity in extreme preterms.

Gantz MG, et al.Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2019 Jun 22.

Defining urinary tract infection by bacterial colony counts: a case for less than 100,000 colonies/mL as the threshold.

Tullus K. Pediatr Nephrol. 2019 Jun 20.

Cervical Spine Injury Risk Factors in Children With Blunt Trauma.

Leonard JC, et al.Pediatrics. 2019 Jun 20.

Immature neutrophils in young febrile infants.

Ramgopal S, et al.Arch Dis Child. 2019 Jun 20.

Recurrent Pneumococcal Meningitis in Children: A Multicenter Case-Control Study.

Darmaun L, et al.Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 Jun 17.

Educational intervention does not reduce non-invasive urine contamination rates in children presenting to the emergency department.

Jacob R, et al.J Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Jun 19.

Short Sleep Duration and Later Overweight in Infants.

Tuohino T, et al.J Pediatr. 2019 Jun 14.

Assessing the Efficacy of Very Early Motor Rehabilitation in Children with Down Syndrome.

Okada S, et al.J Pediatr. 2019 Jun 14.

Assessment and management of tic disorders and Tourette syndrome by Australian paediatricians.

Efron D, et al. J Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Jun 17.

Association of Sexting With Sexual Behaviors and Mental Health Among Adolescents: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis.

Mori C, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 Jun 17.

Mental Illness Among Youth With Chronic Physical Conditions.

Adams JS, et al.Pediatrics. 2019 Jun 14. pii: e20181819.

Predicting risk of underconfidence following maternity leave.

van Boxel E, et al.Arch Dis Child. 2019 Jun 14.

Children’s views on taking medicines and participating in clinical trials.

Nordenmalm S, et al.Arch Dis Child. 2019 Jun 14.

The Right Stuff: Priming Students to Focus on Pertinent Information During Clinical Encounters.

Stuart E, et al.Pediatrics. 2019 Jun 13.

Sleep macro-architecture and micro-architecture in children born preterm with sleep disordered breathing.

Chan M, et al.Pediatr Res. 2019 Jun 13.

How much do parents actually use their smartphones? Pilot study comparing self-report to passive sensing.

Yuan N, et al.Pediatr Res. 2019 Jun 13.

Neurodevelopmental and Academic Outcomes in Children With Orofacial Clefts: A Systematic Review.

Gallagher ER, et al.Pediatrics. 2019 Jun 12.

Diaphragm electromyography results at different high flow nasal cannula flow rates.

Jeffreys E, et al.Eur J Pediatr. 2019 Jun 11.

Challenges to Pertussis Control.

Edwards KM. Pediatrics. 2019 Jun 10.

Acellular Pertussis Vaccine Effectiveness Over Time.

Zerbo O, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Jun 10.

Safety and Efficacy of Low Dose Domperidone for Treating Nausea and Vomiting Due to Acute Gastroenteritis in Children.

Leitz G, et al. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2019 Jun 7.

Endotracheal intubation skills of pediatricians versus anesthetists in neonates and children.

van Sambeeck SJ, et al.Eur J Pediatr. 2019 Jun 8.

Acid Suppression Therapy and Symptom Improvement (or Lack Thereof) in Children.

Boruta M, et al.Pediatrics. 2019 Jun 7.

Early Acid Suppression Therapy Exposure and Fracture in Young Children.

Malchodi L, et al.Pediatrics. 2019 Jun 7.

Fatigue in childhood chronic disease.

Nap-van der Vlist MM, et al.Arch Dis Child. 2019 Jun 7.

Patterns of Electrolyte Testing at Children’s Hospitals for Common Inpatient Diagnoses.

Tchou MJ, et al.Pediatrics. 2019 Jun 6.

A Prediction Model to Identify Febrile Infants ≤60 Days at Low Risk of Invasive Bacterial Infection.

Aronson PL, et al.Pediatrics. 2019 Jun 5.

Prediction Models for Febrile Infants: Time for a Unified Field Theory.

Kuppermann N, et al.Pediatrics. 2019 Jun 5.

The etiological evaluation of sensorineural hearing loss in children.

van Beeck Calkoen EA, et al.Eur J Pediatr. 2019 May 31.

Exome sequencing in the assessment of congenital malformations in the fetus and neonate.

Mone F, et al.Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2019 Jul;104(4):F452-F456.

Clinical Metagenomic Sequencing for Diagnosis of Meningitis and Encephalitis.

Wilson MR, et al. N Engl J Med. 2019 Jun 13;380(24):2327-2340.

Neurodevelopmental Outcomes of Preterm Infants With Retinopathy of Prematurity by Treatment.

Natarajan G, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Jul 23.

Asymptomatic Pharyngeal Carriage of Kingella kingae Among Young Children in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

Masud S, et al. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 Jul 16.

Under-immunization of pediatric transplant recipients: a call to action for the pediatric community.

Feldman AG, et al. Pediatr Res. 2019 Jul 22.

Secular Trends in Pubertal Growth Acceleration in Swedish Boys Born From 1947 to 1996.

Ohlsson C, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 Jul 22.

Male Pubertal Timing-Boys Will Be Men, but When?

Curtis VA, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 Jul 22.

Association of Sleep Problems and Melatonin Use in School-aged Children.

Koopman-Verhoeff ME, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 Jul 22.

Dietary Treatment with Extensively Hydrolyzed Casein Formula Containing the Probiotic Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG Prevents the Occurrence of Functional Gastrointestinal Disorders in Children with Cow’s Milk Allergy.

Nocerino R, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Jul 18.

Observational study of cytomegalovirus from breast milk and necrotising enterocolitis.

Patel RM, et al. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2019 Jul 20.

Pyuria as a Marker of Urinary Tract Infection in Neurogenic Bladder: Is It Reliable?

Su RR, et al. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 Aug;38(8):804-807.

Does caffeine prevent incubation in babies with bronchiolitis who present with apnoea?

Hosheh O, et al. Arch Dis Child. 2019 Jul 20.

Fructose malabsorption in asymptomatic children and in patients with functional chronic abdominal pain: a prospective comparative study.

Martínez-Azcona O, et al. Eur J Pediatr. 2019 Jul 19.

Time course of nocturnal cough and wheezing in children with acute bronchitis monitored by lung sound analysis.

Koehler U, et al. Eur J Pediatr. 2019 Jul 18.

Assessing the appropriateness of the management of otitis media in Australia: A population-based sample survey.

Clay-Williams R, et al. J Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Jul 17.

Predictors for hospital admission of asymptomatic to moderately symptomatic children after drowning.

Cohen N, et al. Eur J Pediatr. 2019 Jul 16.

Rapid Influenza Testing in Infants and Children Younger than 6 Years in Primary Care: Impact on Antibiotic Treatment and Use of Health Services.

van Esso DL, et al. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 Aug;38(8):e187-e189.

Respiratory Virus Epidemiology Among US Infants With Severe Bronchiolitis: Analysis of 2 Multicenter, Multiyear Cohort Studies.

Hasegawa K, et al. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 Aug;38(8):e180-e183.

Association of Screen Time and Depression in Adolescence.

Boers E, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 Jul 15.

DNA Viremia Is Associated with Hyperferritinemia in Pediatric Sepsis.

Simon DW, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Jul 11.

Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Medication and Unintentional Injuries in Children and Adolescents.

Ghirardi L, et al. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2019 Jul 11.

Hyponatremia in children under 100 days old: incidence and etiologies.

Storey C, et al. Eur J Pediatr. 2019 Jul 13.

Neonatal Abstinence Syndrome and Associated Neonatal and Maternal Mortality and Morbidity.

Lisonkova S, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Jul 12.

Effect of intrapartum antibiotics on the intestinal microbiota of infants: a systematic review.

Zimmermann P, et al. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2019 Jul 11.

Management of Infants at Risk for Group B Streptococcal Disease.

Puopolo KM, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Jul 8.

In preterm infants, does fluid restriction, as opposed to liberal fluid prescription, reduce the risk of important morbidities and mortality?

Abbas S, et al. J Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Jul;55(7):860-866.

Problems of feeding, sleeping and excessive crying in infancy: a general population study.

Olsen AL, et al. Arch Dis Child. 2019 Jul 3.

Hearing Loss With Congenital Cytomegalovirus Infection.

Foulon I, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Jul 2.

Delayed Cord Clamping versus Early Cord Clamping in Elective Cesarean Section: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Cavallin F, et al. Neonatology. 2019 Jul 2:1-8.

Prematurity as an Independent Risk Factor for the Development of Pulmonary Disease.

Fierro JL, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Jun 28.

Clinical Characteristics of Primary HHV-6B Infection in Children Visiting the Emergency Room.

Hattori F, et al. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 Jun 20.

3. Guidelines and Best Evidence

Risk of Meningitis in Infants Aged 29 to 90 Days with Urinary Tract Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Nugent J, et al.J Pediatr. 2019 Jun 20.

Medical care for migrant children in Europe: a practical recommendation for first and follow-up appointments.

Schrier L, et al.Eur J Pediatr. 2019 Jun 26.

Mask versus Prongs for Nasal Continuous Positive Airway Pressure in Preterm Infants: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

King BC, et al.Neonatology. 2019 Jun 4:1-15.

Heart Rate Monitoring in Newborn Babies: A Systematic Review.

Anton O, et al.Neonatology. 2019 Jun 27:1-12.

Impact of Cystic Fibrosis on Unaffected Siblings: A Systematic Review.

Chudleigh J, et al.J Pediatr. 2019 Jul;210:112-117.e9.

Probiotics for cow’s milk protein allergy: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials.

Qamer S, et al.Eur J Pediatr. 2019 Jun 22.

Do probiotics help babies with infantile colic?

Rivas-Fernández M, et al.Arch Dis Child. 2019 Jun 22.

A new simple formula built on the American Academy of Pediatrics criteria for the screening of hypertension in overweight/obese children.

Di Bonito P, et al. Eur J Pediatr. 2019 Jun 18.

A Simpler Prediction Rule for Rebound Hyperbilirubinemia.

Chang PW, et al.Pediatrics. 2019 Jun 13.

What evidence-based strategies have been shown to improve breastfeeding rates in preterm infants?

Hilditch C, et al.J Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Jun 22.

Fluids in the management of sepsis in children: a review of guidelines in the aftermath of the FEAST trial.

Dewez JE, et al. Arch Dis Child. 2019 Jul 20.

What paediatricians need to know about the updated 2017 American Heart Association Kawasaki disease guideline.

Phuong LK, et al. Arch Dis Child. 2019 Jul 3.

4. Case Reports

Acute ataxia in a healthy 19-month-old girl.

Jia JL, et al.Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Jul;24(4):218-220.

Recurrent Acute Septic Arthiris caused by Kingella Kingae in a 16-month-old boy

Chosidow A, et al.Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 Jun 20.

Hypotonia and Lethargy in a Two-Day-Old Male Infant.

Long AH, et al.Pediatrics. 2019 Jun 21.

‘A bugging feeling’: a live foreign body in the ear.

Calleja T. Arch Dis Child. 2019 Jun 8.

Somatic symptom disorder should be suspected in children with alleged chronic Lyme disease.

Peri F, et al.Eur J Pediatr. 2019 Jun 29.

When Acute Stridor Is More Than Croup.

Miller MR, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Jul 11.

Spontaneous mediastinal abscess of curious causation.

Stratton H, et al. J Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Jul;55(7):873-874.

An Unusual Presentation of Failure to Thrive.

Baldwin KP, et al. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2019 Jul 3:9922819857738.

 

If we have missed out on something useful or you think other articles are absolutely worth sharing, please add them in the comments!

Bubble Wrap Live 2019 – Article List

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Bubble Wrap Live 2019 – Article List, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.20064

At DFTB19, we had three great talks during the Bubble Wrap Live session. Whilst the videos and podcasts from these talks are still in the works, here’s the list of articles referenced for you to check out ahead of time.

5 Paediatric Emergency Papers

Edward Snelson @sailordoctor

PREDICT: Head Injury and Delayed Presentations to ED

Borland ML, et al. Delayed Presentations to Emergency Departments of Children With Head Injury: A PREDICT Study. Annals of Emergency Medicine, 2018;75 (1):1-10

Oral Prednisolone for preschool viral induced wheeze

Foster SJ, et al. Oral prednisolone in preschool children with virus-associated wheeze: a prospective, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The Lancet Respiratory Medicine. 2018;6(2):97-106

Clinical Prediction Rule for Febrile Infants under 60 days

Kupperman N, et al. A Clinical Prediction Rule to Identify Febrile Infants 60 Days and Younger at Low Risk for Serious Bacterial Infections. JAMA Pediatr.2019;173(4):342-351. doi:10.1001/jamapediatrics.2018.5501

Whole body CT for children with Trauma

Abe T, et al. Is Whole-Body CT Associated With Reduced In-Hospital Mortality in Children With Trauma? A Nationwide Study. Pediatr Crit Care Med. 2019 Jun;20(6):e245-e250. doi: 10.1097/PCC.0000000000001898.

ECLIPSE study

Lyttle MD, et al. Levetiracetam versus phenytoin for second-line treatment of paediatric convulsive status epilepticus (EcLiPSE). The Lancet . 2019;393(10186):2125-2134

 

5 General Paediatrics Papers

Susie Piper @chookiemama

Probiotics and Gastroenteritis

Freedman SB, et al. Multicenter Trial of a Combination Probiotic for Children with Gastroenteritis. N Engl J Med 2018; 379:2015-2026 DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1802597

Acetaminophen and Febrile Seizure Recurrence

Murata S, et al. Acetaminophen and Febrile Seizure Recurrences During the Same Fever Episode. Pediatrics 2018; 142(5): pii: e20181009. doi: 10.1542/peds.2018-1009. Epub 2018 Oct 8.

Hi flow vs CPAP in SCN (HUNTER trial)

Manley BJ, et al. Nasal High‐Flow for Early Respiratory Support of Newborn Infants in Australian Non‐Tertiary Special Care Nurseries (The Hunter Trial): A Multicentre, Randomised, Non‐Inferiority Trial. J Paediatr Child Health. 2018;54:4-4. doi:10.1111/jpc.13882_4

Rudeness and Medical Performance

Riskin A, et al. The Impact of Rudeness on Medical Team Performance: A Randomized Trial. Pediatrics. 2015;136:487-495.

Katz D, et al. Exposure to incivility hinders clinical performance in a simulated operative crisis.

LEGO and poo!

Tagg A, et al. Everything is awesome: Don’t forget the Lego.  2018 Nov 22. doi: 10.1111/jpc.14309. [Epub ahead of print]

 

Paediatric Surgery Papers

Craig McBride @paedsurg

Tissue Paper: Paediatric Burn Wound Care

Brown E.A, et al. Impact of Parental Acute Psychological Distress on Young Child Pain-Related Behavior Through Differences in Parenting Behavior During Pediatric Burn Wound Care. J Clin Psychol Med Settings (2019). https://doi.org/10.1007/s10880-018-9596-1

Brown NJ, et al. Play and heal: Randomized controlled trial of Ditto™ intervention efficacy on improving re-epithelialization in pediatric burns. Burns. 2014;40:204–13.

Paper Planes: Telehealth in Paediatrc Surgery

Brownlee GL, et al. Telehealth in paediatric surgery: Accuracy of clinical decisions made by videoconference. J Paediatr Child Health. 2017;53(12)

Rees CM, et al. Probiotics for the prevention of surgical necrotising enterocolitis: systematic review and meta-analysis.

Sandpaper: Bullying & Discrimination in Surgery

Crebbin, W. , Campbell, G. , Hillis, D. A. and Watters, D. A. (2015), BDSH in surgery in Australasia. ANZ J Surg, 85: 905-909. doi:10.1111/ans.13363

Watters, D. A. (2015), Apology for discrimination, bullying and sexual harassment by the President of the Royal Australasian College of Surgeons. ANZ J Surg, 85: 895-895. doi:10.1111/ans.13362

 

 

DFTB20 will be held in Brisbane, Australia. If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

iTunes Button
 

 

The 31st Bubble Wrap

Cite this article as:
Grace Leo. The 31st Bubble Wrap, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.20429

Article 1: An egg a day keeps the doctor away? (Ecuador)

Ianotti LL, et al. Eggs in Early Complementary Feeding and Child Growth: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Pediatrics; 2017 July [epub] doi: 10.1542/peds.2016-3459

What’s it about?

Childhood stunting is contributed to by both biological factors and environmental factors such as poverty. The World Health Assembly has set a global target to reduce childhood stunting by 40% by 2025. Previous interventions to improve growth have included fortification of food and dietary supplementation. Utilising locally available nutritious food is an important step improving outcomes. Eggs have high nutritional value and contain high concentrations of choline, a nutrient previously found to promote growth in animal models.  There has been no previous study investigating the use of eggs as a complementary nutrition source for infants.

Why does it matter?

The study was completed in Cotopaxi Providence, a rural, indigenous population in Ecuador. This population is estimated to have a baseline prevalence of stunting of 38%. Children aged 6 to 9 months were randomised to treatment (1 egg per day for 6 months [n=83], and control (no intervention [n=80]). Children were excluded if they had a medical condition, severe malnutrition or egg allergy. Eggs were delivered on a weekly basis and a log report egg consumption, morbidities, and anthropometric measures were taken after 6 months. Egg intervention increased length-for-age z score by 0.63 (93% CI, 0.38-0.88, p<0.001), and weight-for-age z score by 0.61 (95% CI 0.45-0.77, p<0.001).  There was a reduced prevalence of stunting by 47% (prevalence ratio, 0.53; 95% CI, 0.37-0.77).  Children in the treatment group also had reduced intake of sugar-sweetened foods compared with control (PR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.51-0.97 p=0.032). 

Clinically Relevant Bottom Line:

This study found that supplementing the diet 6 to 9-month-olds with an egg a day significantly improves linear growth and reduces stunting within a population from a developing country with a high prevalence of stunting (38%). There were no reports of allergic reactions. Care must be taken in applying this study to different contexts and cultural backgrounds.

Reviewed by: Lorraine Cheung

 

Article 2: Maternal influenza immunisation to improve infant outcome (Nepal)

Steinhoff MC, et al. Year-round influenza immunisation during pregnancy in Nepal: a phase 4, randomised, placebo-controlled trial. Lancet Infect Dis. 2017 Sep;17(9):981-989

Why does it matter?

Influenza can cause serious illness in children, especially infants younger than 6 months of age. Immunisations are strongly recommended to pregnant woman and any child over 6 months of age. Maternal immunisation during pregnancy induces high levels of maternal antibodies that can be transferred to the foetus and prevents influenza virus infection both in pregnant women and their infants during their first few months of life.

What’s it about?

This randomised controlled trial assessed the safety and efficacy of maternal influenza immunisations in mothers and infants in Nepal, where Influenza viruses circulate perennially.  They recruited 3693 women in 17 to 34 weeks of gestation between 2011 to 2013. Maternal influenza immunisations were offered throughout the year, with 3629 infants included in the immunisation efficacy analysis.

The study found that influenza immunisation reduced maternal febrile influenza-like illness with an overall efficacy of 19% (95% CI 1-34).  Among infants followed from birth to six months of age, immunisation had an overall efficacy of 30% (95% CI 5-48. There was also a 42g increase in birth weight (95% CI: 8-76) among infants born to immunised mothers (with an overall decrease in low birth weight infants by 15%). There were no differences noted in the rates of small for gestational age infants or preterm birth. Both groups had a similar number of adverse events.

Clinically Relevant Bottom Line:

Maternal influenza immunisation reduced maternal influenza-like illness, influenza in infants and rates of low birth weight in Nepal. Maternal immunisation should be considered in subtropical regions where the virus is present for many months.

Reviewed by: Jessica Win See Wong

 

Article 3: Comparing infusion rates of fluid boluses in septic shock (India)

Sankar J et al. Fluid Bolus Over 15-20 Versus 5-10 Minutes Each in the First Hour of Resuscitation in Children With Septic Shock: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Pediatric Critical Care Medicine. 2017 Oct; 18(10)

What’s it about?

This was a randomised controlled trial where the researchers identified children with septic shock in paediatric ED and ICU in a tertiary hospital in northern India, and compared intravenous fluid boluses of 40-60mL/kg per hour in 20mL/kg aliquots delivered over 15-20 minutes versus over 5-10 minutes. Primary outcomes were the need for mechanical ventilation and/or impaired oxygenation. There were several other secondary objectives.

Subjects were aged 9 months to 12 years and included children with suspected infection with two or more clinical signs of decreased perfusion. They excluded children with dengue, malaria, severe anaemia, severe malnutrition, primary cardiac illness, those on non-invasive ventilation before developing shock, those who had already received fluids or inotropes, and those with contraindications to central line insertion.

This was a small RCT, with only 96 children randomised. The study was terminated after about 50% enrolment after interim analysis suggested harm in the 5-10 minute group. They found that children who received fluid boluses over 5-10 minutes were at higher risk of intubation and mechanical ventilation, had higher rates of intubation due to fluid overload, and had higher percentages of fluid overload in 24 hours. There was no difference in the mortality rate.

Why does it matter?

Recognition and treatment of sepsis is huge in acute paediatrics. Guidelines around the world recommend treating septic shock with fluid resuscitation of up to 60mL/kg as boluses, although the 2011 FEAST trial highlighted the potential harms of fluid boluses, suggesting a cautious approach to fluid bolus administration.

Instead of looking at different fluid volumes or types of fluid, this study compared infusion times. Unlike in the FEAST study, they excluded children vulnerable to the effects of fluid overload, allowing for more broad applicability of the results. Both groups of children received almost identical volumes of fluid as boluses; it was only the infusion times that differed.

The researchers suggested that rapid fluid bolus administration is difficult in developing countries due to a shortage of staff to administer the boluses, and fear of fluid overload and need for ventilation, which is not easy to achieve in resource-restricted settings.

The Bottom Line

Research is yet to identify the optimal fluid management of septic shock in developing and developed countries, so in the meantime caution is prudent.

Reviewed by: Katie Nash

 

Article 4: Think zinc! (India)

Negi K et al. Serum zinc, copper and iron status of children with coeliac disease on three months of gluten-free diet with or without four weeks of zinc supplements: a randomised controlled trial. Trop Doct. 2018; 48(2): 112-116. Doi: 10.1177/0049475517740312.

Why does it matter?

Coeliac disease is characterised by gluten intolerance which leads to damage to the small bowel mucosa via an autoimmune process in genetically susceptible individuals. Partial or total villous atrophy affects the maintenance of nutrients. Zinc is implicated in the improvement of mucosal healing and faster normalisation of micronutrient status in susceptible patients. Therefore, zinc supplementation may prove to be beneficial in patients with coeliac disease.

What’s it about?

This study compares the serum zinc, iron and copper status in paediatric patients following a gluten-free diet with or without zinc supplementation. All children aged <18 years with newly diagnosed coeliac disease were randomised to either the gluten-free diet (GFD) group or the glute-free diet + zinc supplementation (GFD+Zn) group via computer-generated random sequences. Patients were assessed with clinical history, examination and blood tests at baseline and various follow-up review up to 3 months. Unsurprisingly, iron, zinc and copper levels were below the normal range at baseline in all patients. The rise in haemoglobin, serum iron and ferritin levels was better in the GFD+Zn group than the GFD alone group. Otherwise, there was no significant difference in the rise of zinc, copper and weight gain in the two groups.

Clinically Relevant Bottom Line:

The study has shown that zinc supplementation significantly improves iron status but does not affect serum zinc or copper levels. The authors speculate this may be secondary to the contributory effect of zinc towards mucosal healing and improvement of intestinal absorption. Although interesting, it would have been helpful to couple these biochemical results with endoscopic findings with zinc supplementation. Nevertheless, the mainstay of treatment for coeliac disease remains the gluten-free diet and you may think of supplementing zinc if you want a faster improvement in iron status

Reviewed by: Jennifer Moon

 

Article 5: The power of playtime (Ethiopia)

Worku, B.N., et al  Effects of home-based play-assisted stimulation on developmental performances of children living in extreme poverty: a randomized single-blind controlled trial. BMC Paediatrics. 2018 Vol 18. doi: 10.1186/s12887-018-1023-0.

Why does it matter?

A child’s development is dependent on social, economic and environmental factors. In third world countries where children are brought up in extreme poverty, a multitude of factors negatively impacts their development. We know that early intervention can prevent developmental loss, in both developed and developing countries. The challenge is finding a sustainable way to deliver effective intervention.

What’s it about?

The study looked at foster children aged between 3 and 59 months, living with foster mothers in Jimma, a town in Ethiopia. The children were randomly assigned to intervention and control groups at a 1:1 ratio. The intervention group received home-based play stimulation once a week for 6 months, which focused on activities to promote developmental skills and mother-child interactions. The therapy was provided by a trained nurse, however, they also spent time teaching the foster mothers, so they could provide ongoing play therapy at home.

The assessors, who were blinded to the children’s allocations, used culturally specific and standardized developmental screening tools, at baseline, 3 months and 6 months. The study found that intervention was beneficial for language, social-emotional and personal-social performances (statistically significant for language [P = 0.0014], personal-social [P = 0.0087] and social-emotional [P < 0.0001] performances).

Clinically Relevant Bottom Line:

The study showed positive effects on multiple domains of development in the 6 months of follow up for children who received home-based play therapy. This approach is highly sustainable, as the foster mother’s acquired skills means they can continue to provide play therapy and hopefully, continue to have positive effects on children living in resource-limited settings.

Reviewed by: Tina Abi Abdallah

 

If we have missed out on something useful or you think other articles are absolutely worth sharing, please add them in the comments! We are also looking to expand the Bubble Wrap team so please contact us if you’re interested in this! That’s it for this month. Many thanks to all of our reviewers who have taken the time to scour the literature so you don’t have to. 

The 30th Bubble Wrap

Cite this article as:
Grace Leo. The 30th Bubble Wrap, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.19868

Article 1: What’s the risk of infants 29-90 days having both UTI and meningitis?

Nugent, J., et al Risk of Meningitis in Infants Aged 29 to 90 Days with Urinary Tract Infection: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Journal of Paediatrics; 2019 June [eprint] doi: 10.1016/j.jpeds.2019.04.053

What’s it about?

UTI remains the most common serious bacterial infection in infants, and infants under 28 days routinely undergo a complete septic work up when presenting to ED with a fever. For infants aged between 29 – 90 days, the decision to LP is guided by clinical findings and left up to the treating physician. So, what are the chances that febrile baby with the positive urinalysis also has meningitis?

Why does it matter?

This systematic review looked at the pooled prevalence of co-existing meningitis, bacterial or aseptic. The authors searched 3 databases for studies reporting on the rates of meningitis in infants aged 29 – 90 days who had abnormal urinalysis or culture results (but were not necessarily febrile at presentation) who also had LPs performed as part of their work up. A total of 20 studies (3 prospective and 17 retrospective) were identified.

The review found the pooled prevalence of concomitant bacterial meningitis in infants with UTI was 0.25% (95% CI, 0.09%-0.70%). This translates to a number needed to investigate with LP for 1 diagnosis of meningitis of 400. The pooled prevalence for aseptic meningitis over the 20 studies was not able to be calculated, but in some studies the prevalence was as high as 29%.

Clinically Relevant Bottom Line:

Based on this systematic review, the risk of bacterial meningitis in infants aged 29-90 days with evidence of UTI is low, but the decision to LP should always take into consideration the clinical picture, as opposed to a calculated pre-test probability.

Reviewed by: Tina Abi Abdallah

Article 2: Anima sana in corpore sano: Does a healthy body equal a healthy soul?

Easterlin MC, et al. Association of Team Sports Participation With Long-term Mental Health Outcomes Among Individuals Exposed to Adverse Childhood Experiences. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 May 28 [Epub ahead of print].

What’s it about?

Adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and/or mental health problems are unfortunately very common, but the impact and extent of these events may differ from person to person. This article addresses whether team sports may influence well being in adulthood after ACEs. ACEs were defined as physical and sexual abuse, emotional neglect, parental alcohol misuse, parental incarceration, and living with a single parent extracted from the data of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent to Adult Health (National Population sample of US adolescents – 1994 and 2008). Multivariable logistic regression models were used to score factors associated with team sport participation. About half of the participants (9668 individuals included in the study – 4888 (49.3%)) reported 1 or more ACEs. Among those with ACEs, team sports participation during adolescence was significantly associated with lower odds of receiving a diagnosis of depression, anxiety or having current depressive symptoms (adjusted odds ratios, 0.76, 0.70 and 0.85 respectively).

Why does it matter?

Adverse childhood experiences can have long-term mental health consequences, but the knowledge of factors improving mental health after these events is lacking. This study showed an association with team spots and improved mental health and could be an ‘easy’ tool to improve well being in traumatised children.

Clinically Relevant Bottom Line:

Team sport participation in adolescence was associated with better mental health outcomes in children with ACEs. As suggested by the authors, team sports may be an important and scalable resilience builder.

Reviewed by: Anke Raaijmakers 

Article 3: Another look at risk factors for cervical spine injury in children with blunt trauma

Leonard JC, et al. Cervical Spine Injury Risk Factors in Children with Blunt Trauma. Pediatrics 2019, 144 (1). doi.org/10.1542/peds.2018-3221

What’s it about?

Four tertiary care hospitals which are part of the USA based Paediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network (PECARN) ran a prospective observational study to look at risk factors of cervical spine injury in children with blunt trauma. They then compared the PECARN model with a de novo model of risk factors. After screening  11809 children with blunt trauma, approximately were found to be eligible and 4144 children were enrolled. Of 4091 children, 1.8% (74) had a cervical spine injury.  Children who didn’t receive cervical spine imaging had medical record and subsequent call follow up (if no imaging) to verify the absence of injury.  Treating ED providers filled out electronic questionnaire prior to knowledge of cervical spine image results. These questionnaires assessed for risk factors including injury mechanism, patient variables and physical findings.

Fourteen risk factors were identified as having significant association with CSIs in this study. PECARN criteria currently include 8 risk factors (high-risk MVC, diving mechanism, conditions predisposing for CSI, neck pain, reported inability to move neck, altered mental status, limited neck range of motion on exam, substantial torso injury and focal neurological deficits). Three of these variables were not found to be independently associated with CSIs in the analysis of data collected: high risk MVC, conditions predisposing for CSI and limited neck range of movement on examination

A de novo model was proposed of 7 variables: diving mechanism, axial load, neck pain, reported inability to move neck, altered mental status, respiratory distress, and intubation.

Comparing PECARN with this de novo model slightly increased the sensitivity (90.5 to 91.9%) and specificity (45.6% to 50.3%). Extrapolated imaging rates using the PECARN and de novo risk model would decrease from 78.2% to 55.1% and 50.5% respectively and roughly halve CT scan. Both models missed children with CSIs – 7 in PECARN and 6 with the de novo model however on retrospective chart review 6 of the 7 missed children had a PECARN risk factor. None of those missed had surgical intervention but two were managed with medical devices (brace or rigid cervical collars).

The Bottom Line

This study presents data from 4 US trauma centres to improve identification of cervical spine injury risk factors in children. A de novo model with 7 risk factors has been examined and compared with the existing PECARN model and would yield slightly improved results and would have missed one less child with CSI in the group of over 4000 children studied.

Reviewed by: Grace Leo

Article 4: Drowning in the school holidays

Peden A et al. The association between school holidays and unintentional fatal drowning among children and adolescents aged 5-17 years. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health. 2019 May; 55(5), pp. 533-538.

Why does it matter?

Australia is an island with 85% of its population living within 50 km of the coastal line. Thanks to a mostly temperate climate, many families and young people enjoy spending time at beaches, rivers and lakes, as well as many households having swimming pools. Therefore, drowning becomes a very real problem, especially for children and young people. In fact, drowning is a leading killer of young people, however children and adolescents aged 5-17 years have one of the lowest rates. This could be due to the protective effect of time spent in formal schooling and this study shows how the risk of drowning differs during time spent at school versus school holidays.

What’s it about?

The investigators extracted the data from the Australian Royal Life Saving National Fatal Drowning Database over 2005-2014. A total of 188 children/adolescents aged 5-17 years drowned during the study period. There was a significant difference between drowning incidence during school holidays (including public holidays) and school days (P value <0.01), with relative risk (RR) of drowning on a holiday being 2.40 times higher than on a school day (CI 1.82-3.18). The risk was higher for children 5-9 years (RR = 3.05; CI 1.98-4.72) than adolescents 10-17 years (RR = 2.02; CI 1.38-2.93). The risk was similar for males and females in this age group. Most drowning incidents occurred at a river, creek or stream, as opposed to a beach or swimming pool.

Clinically Relevant Bottom Line:

As might be expected the rate of drowning in children and adolescents is much higher during school holidays than during formal schooling (with this study finding a relative risk 2.4 times higher). Although there are limitations to this study,  it advocates for ongoing drowning risk reduction strategies but particularly in the lead-up to school holiday periods in school-aged children and adolescents.

Reviewed by: Jennifer Moon

Article 5: The global impact of rotavirus vaccine in children under 5 years of age

Aliabadi N, et al. Global impact of rotavirus vaccine introduction on rotavirus hospitalisations among children under 5 years of age, 2008–16: ndings from the Global Rotavirus Surveillance Network. Lancet Glob Health 2019; 7: e893-903

Why does it matter?

In 2015, Rotavirus gastroenteritis  accounted for an estimated 250,000 deaths and 1·9 million episodes per year of severe acute gastroenteritis requiring hospital admis­sion in the under 5 year old age group. This paper cites that rotavirus vaccination has an efficacy of ranging from 57% to 85% for RV1 and from 45% to 90% for RV5 based on countries’ mortality strata. WHO recommends rotavirus vaccination as part of the national immunisation scheme for all countries. This study helps to assess the impact of introduction of rotavirus vaccinations.


What’s it about?

This paper presents the findings of the World Health Organisation (WHO) co-ordinated Global Rotavirus Surveillance Network (GRSN) to examine the rates of rotavirus confirmed hospital admissions prior to and following introduction of rotavirus vaccine globally between 2008-16 across 69 countries. Whilst it covers areas in Africa, the Americas, Eastern Mediterranean and European region, some of the countries the GRSN does not include are UK, American, Canadian, Russia, Australia or New Zealand. As China joined after 2016 it was also not included in the assessed population.

The prospective study looked at children under 5 years old admitted to hospital across the GRSN sites with acute gastroenteritis who subsequently had stool PCR within 48 hours to assess for rotavirus infection. It assessed the difference in cases pre and post-vaccine periods. The was a main analysis of data included sites with over 1 year of enrolment and over 100 specimens tested per year (305789 cases across 69 countries). Three further sensitivity analysis looked at cases 1) that did not have both pre and post vaccine data 2) regions with vaccine coverage <60% or vaccine not introduced, 3) Slightly relaxed lab inclusions to account for smaller labs. There was insufficient data to be able to combine these three groups. The study reports one third of children (32.9%) included had confirmed rotavirus gastroenteritis. Presentations of rotavirus gastroenteritis reduced 38% pre-vaccination to 23% post vaccination of cases included (with a relative reduction of 39.6%, CI 35.4-43.8). This data uses the mean proportion of children who were positive and the actual range between the two groups overlapped. The three other sensitivity analysis showed similar rates of overall reduction in rotavirus presentations.

The Bottom Line

This WHO-GSRN large impact analysis of rotavirus vaccination in children under 5 included 305,789 children, of which one third had confirmed rotavirus gastroenteritis. Between pre and post-vaccination periods, there was a relative decline in rotavirus gastroenteritis hospital presentations of almost 40%.  Rotavirus vaccination is effective in reducing hospital admissions for rotavirus gastroenteritis and should be considered for introduction in countries not yet covered such as part of Africa and southeast Asia.

(Ed note: If you’re interested in gastroenteritis, you may also be interested to know that Archives of Disease of Childhood has just published a systematic review and meta-analysis looking at Gelatin tannate (a protective gelatin with  astringent, antibacterial, and anti-inflammatory properties) in the use of acute diarrhoea and gastroenteritis in children. There was no difference with placebo).

Reviewed by: Grace Leo

If we have missed out on something useful or you think other articles are absolutely worth sharing, please add them in the comments! We are also looking to expand the Bubble Wrap team so please contact us if you’re interested in this! That’s it for this month. Many thanks to all of our reviewers who have taken the time to scour the literature so you don’t have to. 

Bumper Bubble Wrap PLUS – May/June 2019

Cite this article as:
Anke Raaijmakers. Bumper Bubble Wrap PLUS – May/June 2019, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.19367

Can’t get enough of Bubble Wrap? The Bubble Wrap Plus is a monthly paediatric journal club reading list  from Anke Raaijmakers working with Professor Jaan Toelen & his team of the University Hospitals in Leuven. This comprehensive list is developed from 34 journals, including major and subspecialty paediatric journals. We suggest this list can help you discover relevant or interesting articles for your local journal club or simply help you to keep an finger on the pulse of paediatric research.

This list features answers to intriguing questions such as: ‘Is it time to stop checking gastric residual volume in neonates?’, ‘Do we need to flush peripheral catheters?’, Is methotrexate a good drug to treat atopic dermatitis?’, ‘How long does the DTP vaccine provide protection?’, ‘Is routine ultrasound for the hip necessary after breech presentation?’, ‘For which children is team sport participation associated with better adult mental health?’,  ‘What is the outcome after a 10-min APGAR score of zero?’ and ‘What is the effect of online health information (Dr Google) on trust in pediatricians’ diagnoses?’.

You will find the list is broken down into four sections:

MAY PAPERS

1.Reviews and opinion articles

Glucocorticoids for Croup in Children.

Gates A, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 Apr 29.

The role of objective tests to support a diagnosis of asthma in children.

Danvers L, et al. Paediatr Respir Rev. 2019 Feb 28.

Invasive group A streptococcal disease: Management and chemoprophylaxis.

Moore DL, et al. Paediatr Child Health. 2019 May;24(2):128-129.

Relaxation training for management of paediatric headache: A rapid review.

Thompson AP, et al. Paediatr Child Health. 2019 May;24(2):103-114.

Necrotizing Enterocolitis, Gut Microbiota, and Brain Development: Role of the Brain-Gut Axis.

Niemarkt HJ, et al. Neonatology. 2019 Apr 11;115(4):423-431.

Newborn screening for cystic fibrosis: Is there benefit for everyone?

Course CW, et al. Paediatr Respir Rev. 2019 Feb 28.

Ethical Issues in Perinatal Clinical Research.

Walsh V, et al. Neonatology. 2019 Apr 4;116(1):52-57.

Machine Learning in Medicine.

Rajkomar A, et al. N Engl J Med. 2019 Apr 4;380(14):1347-1358.

The child with an incessant dry cough.

Galway NC, et al. Paediatr Respir Rev. 2018 Aug 30.

2. Original clinical studies

Association of Rhinovirus C Bronchiolitis and Immunoglobulin E Sensitization During Infancy With Development of Recurrent Wheeze.

Hasegawa K, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 Apr 1.

Respiratory Syncytial Virus, Rhinoviruses, and Recurrent Wheezing: Unraveling the Riddle Opens New Opportunities for Targeted Interventions.

Ramilo O, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 Apr 1.

Effect of Gastric Residual Evaluation on Enteral Intake in Extremely Preterm Infants: A Randomized Clinical Trial.

Parker LA, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 Apr 29.

Lack of Efficacy of Lactobacillus reuteri DSM 17938 for the Treatment of Acute Gastroenteritis: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

Szymański H, et al. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 Apr 25.

Flushing of peripheral intravenous catheters: A pilot, factorial, randomised controlled trial of high versus low frequency and volume in paediatrics.

Kleidon TM, et al. J Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Apr 29.

The association between crowding within households and behavioural problems in children: Longitudinal data from the Southampton Women’s Survey.

Marsh R, et al.  Paediatr Perinat Epidemiol. 2019 Apr 29.

Genetic and Early-Life Environmental Influences on Dental Caries Risk: A Twin Study.

Silva MJ, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Apr 26.

The Association of Paternal IQ With Autism Spectrum Disorders and its Comorbidities: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

Gardner RM, et al. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2019 Apr 23.

Rethinking ADHD intervention trials: feasibility testing of two treatments and a methodology.

Fibert P, et al. Eur J Pediatr. 2019 Apr 24.

Long-term effect of methotrexate for childhood atopic dermatitis.

Purvis D, et al. J Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Apr 23.

Sleep-Related Infant Suffocation Deaths Attributable to Soft Bedding, Overlay, and Wedging.

Erck Lambert AB, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Apr 22.

Effect of Albuterol Premedication vs Placebo on the Occurrence of Respiratory Adverse Events in Children Undergoing Tonsillectomies: The REACT Randomized Clinical Trial.

von Ungern-Sternberg BS, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 Apr 22.

Duration of Immunity and Effectiveness of Diphtheria-Tetanus-Acellular Pertussis Vaccines in Children.

Domenech de Cellès M, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 Apr 22.

Contribution of Sensory Processing to Chronic Constipation in Preschool Children.

Little LM, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Apr 12.

Postvaccination Febrile Seizure Severity and Outcome.

Deng L, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Apr 19.

The effect of pediatric patient temperament on post-operative outcomes.

Uhl K, et al. Paediatr Anaesth. 2019 Apr 18.

Adolescent and Young Adult Cancer Patients’ Experiences With Treatment Decision-making.

Mack JW, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Apr 18.

Evaluation of referrals for short stature: A retrospective chart review.

Yue D, et al. Paediatr Child Health. 2019 May;24(2):e74-e77.

Respiratory Viruses Frequently Mimic Pertussis in Young Infants.

Damouni Shalabi R, et al. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 May;38(5):e107-e109.

The Clinical Presentation of Pediatric Mycoplasma pneumoniae Infections-A Single Center Cohort.

Gordon O, et al. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 Apr 10.

Paediatric reference intervals are heterogeneous and differ considerably in the classification of healthy paediatric blood samples.

Alnor AB, et al. Eur J Pediatr. 2019 Apr 17.

Investigating the need for routine ultrasound screening to detect developmental dysplasia of the hip in infants born with breech presentation.

D’Alessandro M, et al. Paediatr Child Health. 2019 May;24(2):e88-e93.

High-density Bacterial Nasal Carriage in Children Is Transient and Associated With Respiratory Viral Infections-Implications for Transmission Dynamics.

Thors V, et al. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 May;38(5):533-538.

Children With Noncritical Infections Have Increased Intestinal Permeability, Endotoxemia and Altered Innate Immune Responses.

Sturgeon JP, et al. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 Apr 10.

The Role of Patient and Parental Resilience in Adolescents with Chronic Musculoskeletal Pain.

Gmuca S, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Apr 10.

Proband and Familial Autoimmune Diseases Are Associated With Proband Diagnosis of Autism Spectrum Disorders.

Spann MN, et al. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2019 May;58(5):496-505.

Breastfeeding in Infancy and Lipid Profile in Adolescence.

Hui LL, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Apr 9. pii: e20183075.

Classic Metaphyseal Lesions among Victims of Abuse.

Adamsbaum C, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Apr 5.

Postextubation Dysphagia in Pediatric Populations: Incidence, Risk Factors, and Outcomes.

Hoffmeister J, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Apr 3. pii: S0022-3476(19)30243-4.

Pediatric Septic Arthritis of the Knee: Predictors of Septic Hip Do Not Apply.

Obey MR, et al. J Pediatr Orthop. 2019 Apr 3.

Association between hypotension and serious illness in the emergency department: an observational study.

Hagedoorn NN, et al. Arch Dis Child. 2019 Apr 4.

Association of In Vitro Fertilization With Childhood Cancer in the United States.

Spector LG, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 Apr 1:e190392.

Prenatal Omega-6:Omega-3 Ratio and Attention Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder Symptoms.

López-Vicente M, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Mar 22.

Molecular Genetic Anatomy and Risk Profile of Hirschsprung’s Disease.

Tilghman JM, et al. N Engl J Med. 2019 Apr 11;380(15):1421-1432.

4. Case reports

Gaze Palsy: An Important Diagnostic Clue.

Madaan P, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Apr 24.

When Posture Gives the Clue: “Jug Handle Deformity”.

Banerjee A, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Apr 17.

A 10-year-old female with unilateral seventh cranial nerve palsy.

Gohal S, et al. Paediatr Child Health. 2019 May;24(2):69-71.

A boy with developmental regression.

MacLellan K, et al. Paediatr Child Health. 2019 May;24(2):67-68.

A Healthy Toddler With Fever and Lethargy.

Suri NA, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Apr 5. pii: e20180412.

Acute encephalopathy associated with influenza infection: Case report and review of the literature.

Albaker A, et al. Paediatr Child Health. 2019 May;24(2):122-124.

JUNE PAPERS

2. Original clinical studies

Risk of invasive bacterial infections by week of age in infants: prospective national surveillance, England, 2010-2017.

Ladhani SN, et al. Arch Dis Child. 2019 May 30.

Impact of paediatric tonsillectomy perioperative management on pain, nausea and recovery: A prospective cohort study.

Richards J, et al. J Paediatr Child Health. 2019 May 29.

Efficacy and safety of systemic hydrocortisone for the prevention of bronchopulmonary dysplasia in preterm infants: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

Morris IP, et al. Eur J Pediatr. 2019 May 29.

Severe Acute Respiratory Failure in Healthy Adolescents Exposed to Trimethoprim-Sulfamethoxazole.

Miller JO, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 May 29.

Retrospective study of budesonide in children with eosinophilic gastroenteritis.

Fang S, et al.Pediatr Res. 2019 May 29.

Care for children with severe chronic skin diseases.

De Maeseneer H, Van Gysel D, et al. Eur J Pediatr. 2019 May 22.

Association of Team Sports Participation With Long-term Mental Health Outcomes Among Individuals Exposed to Adverse Childhood Experiences.

Easterlin MC, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 May 28.

FEEDMI: A Study Protocol to Determine the Influence of Infant-Feeding on Very-Preterm-Infant’s Gut Microbiota.

Morais J, et al. Neonatology. 2019 May 27:1-6.

Association between early life (prenatal and postnatal) antibiotic administration and coeliac disease: a systematic review.

Kołodziej M, et al. Arch Dis Child. 2019 May 25.

The effect of follow-up after a negative double-blinded placebo-controlled cow’s milk challenge on successful reintroduction.

Schrijvers M, et al. Eur J Pediatr. 2019 May 24.

Prevalence of Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease Symptoms in Infants and Children: A Systematic Review.

Singendonk M, et al. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2019 Jun;68(6):811-817.

What does sleep hygiene have to offer children’s sleep problems?

Hall WA, et al. Paediatr Respir Rev. 2018 Nov 9.

Physiological effects of high-flow nasal cannula therapy in preterm infants.

Liew Z, et al. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2019 May 23.

Treatment failure in children diagnosed with constipation in a paediatric emergency department in relation to Rome III criteria.

Eltorki M, et al. Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Jun;24(3):185-192.

Traffic Crashes, Violations, and Suspensions Among Young Drivers With ADHD.

Curry AE, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 May 20.

Preparing for Discharge From the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit.

Gupta M, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 May 3.

Infant Deaths in Sitting Devices.

Liaw P, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 May 20.

Higher Sun Exposure is Associated With Lower Risk of Pediatric Inflammatory Bowel Disease: A Matched Case-Control Study.

Holmes EA, et al. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2019 May 15.

Genetic Associations Between Executive Functions and a General Factor of Psychopathology.

Harden KP, et al. J Am Acad Child Adolesc Psychiatry. 2019 May 15.

Accuracy of surgeon prediction of appendicitis severity in pediatric patients.

Yu YR, et al. J Pediatr Surg. 2019 Apr 24.

Outcomes related to 10-min Apgar scores of zero in Japan.

Shibasaki J, et al. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2019 May 15.

Topiramate plus Cooling for Hypoxic-Ischemic Encephalopathy: A Randomized, Controlled, Multicenter, Double-Blinded Trial.

Nuñez-Ramiro A, et al. Neonatology. 2019 May 15;116(1):76-84.

Risk factors for development of urinary tract infection in children with nephrolithiasis.

Cetin N, et al. J Paediatr Child Health. 2019 May 14.

LISTERIA MENINGITIS IN DANISH CHILDREN 2000-2017: A Rare Event Even in a Country With High Rates of Invasive Listeriosis.

Vissing NH, et al. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 May 15.

Cerebral oxygenation and blood flow in term infants during postnatal transition: BabyLux project.

De Carli A, et al. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2019 May 13.

Machine Learning at the Clinical Bedside-The Ghost in the Machine.

Zorc JJ, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 May 13.

Comparison of Machine Learning Optimal Classification Trees With the Pediatric Emergency Care Applied Research Network Head Trauma Decision Rules.

Bertsimas D, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 May 13.

Adherence to metformin is reduced during school holidays and weekends in children with type 1 diabetes participating in a randomised controlled trial.

Leggett C, et al. Arch Dis Child. 2019 May 11.

Physicians’ Attitudes on Resuscitation of Extremely Premature Infants: A Systematic Review.

Cavolo A, Dierckx de Casterlé B, Naulaers G, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 May 10. pii: e20183972.

Young people’s experiences of brief inpatient treatment for anorexia nervosa.

Thabrew H, et al. J Paediatr Child Health. 2019 May 6.

Increasing the dose of oral vitamin K prophylaxis and its effect on bleeding risk.

Löwensteyn YN, et al. Eur J Pediatr. 2019 May 6.

Antibiotic Treatment in the First Week of Life Impacts the Growth Trajectory in the First Year of Life in Term Infants.

Kamphorst K, et al. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2019 Apr 15.

Abdominal Wall Pain or Irritable Bowel Syndrome: Validation of a Pediatric Questionnaire.

Siawash M, et al. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2019 May 2.

Virtual Reality for Pediatric Needle Procedural Pain: Two Randomized Clinical Trials.

Chan E, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Jun;209:160-167.e4.

Paging Dr. Google: The Effect of Online Health Information on Trust in Pediatricians’ Diagnoses.

Sood N, et al. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2019 May 1:9922819845163.

Nebulised surfactant to reduce severity of respiratory distress: a blinded, parallel, randomised controlled trial.

Minocchieri S, et al. Arch Dis Child Fetal Neonatal Ed. 2019 May;104(3):F313-F319.

Nasal High-Flow Therapy for Newborn Infants in Special Care Nurseries.

Manley BJ, et al. N Engl J Med. 2019 May 23;380(21):2031-2040.

Mometasone or Tiotropium in Mild Asthma with a Low Sputum Eosinophil Level.

Lazarus SC, et al. N Engl J Med. 2019 May 23;380(21):2009-2019.

Association of Gestational Weight Gain With Adverse Maternal and Infant Outcomes.

LifeCycle Project-Maternal Obesity and Childhood Outcomes Study Group, et al. JAMA. 2019 May 7;321(17):1702-1715.

Prepregnancy Body Mass Index, Weight Gain During Pregnancy, and Health Outcomes.

McDermott MM, et al. JAMA. 2019 May 7;321(17):1715.

4. Case reports

Playful Child, Dangerous Intruder: A Case of Silent Foreign Body Aspiration in a 13-Month-Old Boy.

Bradshaw J, et al. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2019 May 25:9922819851265.

History Matters: A 20-Month-Old Child With Cough and Congestion.

Ellis S, et al. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2019 May 21:9922819850484.

A Teenager With Painful Oral and Genital Lesions.

DiSantis F, et al. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2019 May 21:9922819850478.

Hypothermia and Vomiting in a Newborn Without Prenatal Care.

Nichols K, et al. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2019 May 21:9922819850485.

Vomiting and seizure following circumcision in an infant.

Fleming L, et al. Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Jun;24(3):146-147.

An interlabial mass-like lesion in an otherwise healthy newborn girl.

Navabi B, et al. Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Jun;24(3):143-145.

Blurry Vision and Irregularly Shaped Pupil in a 3-Year-Old Female.

Boye B, et al. Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2019 May 20:9922819850460.

Asymmetric Crying Facies Syndrome.

Ho KY, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 May 3.

Nicolau Syndrome: A Rare Complication following Intramuscular Injection.

Quincer E, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 May 3.

If we have missed out on something useful or you think other articles are absolutely worth sharing, please add them in the comments!

Bubble Wrap PLUS – April 2019

Cite this article as:
Anke Raaijmakers. Bubble Wrap PLUS – April 2019, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18568

Welcome to April’s Bubble Wrap Plus, our monthly paediatric journal club provided by Professor Jaan Toelen & his team of the University Hospitals in Leuven (Belgium). This comprehensive list of ‘articles to read’ comes from 34 journals, including Pediatrics, The Journal of Pediatrics, Archives of Disease in Childhood, JAMA Pediatrics, Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, NEJM, and many more.

This month’s list features answers to intriguing questions (and maybe answers) such as: ‘Do pediatricians follow guidelines when managing status epilepticus in children?’, ‘Does antibiotic prophylaxis for UTI lead to fewer non-UTI infections?’, ‘Is intranasal fentanyl safe for procedural pain management in neonates?’ and ‘Does the early or late introduction of allergens change the development of atopic disease?’.

You will find the list broken down into four sections:

1.Reviews and opinion articles

Helicobacter pylori Infection.

Crowe SE. N Engl J Med. 2019 Mar 21;380(12):1158-1165.

Evaluation of the child with global developmental delay and intellectual disability.

Bélanger SA, et al. Paediatr Child Health. 2018 Sep;23(6):403-419.

Closing the Disclosure Gap: Medical Errors in Pediatrics.

Lin M, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Mar 13.

Why, when, and how to give surfactant.

Jobe AH. Pediatr Res. 2019 Mar 12.

The pathogenesis and management of renal scarring in children with vesicoureteric reflux and pyelonephritis.

Murugapoopathy V, et al. Pediatr Nephrol. 2019 Mar 7.

Communication with children and adolescents about the diagnosis of a life-threatening condition in their parent.

Dalton L, et al. Lancet. 2019 Mar 16;393(10176):1164-1176.

Communication with children and adolescents about the diagnosis of their own life-threatening condition.

Stein A, et al. Lancet. 2019 Mar 16;393(10176):1150-1163.

Paediatric sarcoidosis.

Nathan N, et al.Paediatr Respir Rev. 2019 Feb;29:53-59.

Human milk as “chrononutrition”: implications for child health and development.

Hahn-Holbrook J, et al.Pediatr Res. 2019 Mar 11. 

2. Original clinical studies

Association Between Year of Birth and 1-Year Survival Among Extremely Preterm Infants in Sweden During 2004-2007 and 2014-2016.

Norman M, et al. JAMA. 2019 Mar 26;321(12):1188-1199.

Management of status epilepticus in children prior to medical retrieval: Deviations from the guidelines.

Uppal P, et al. J Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Mar 28.

What Do NICU Fellows Identify as Important for Achieving Competency in Neonatal Intubation?

Brady J, et al.Neonatology. 2019 Mar 19;116(1):10-16.

Achieving Procedural Competency during Neonatal Fellowship Training: Can Trainees Teach Us How to Teach?

Marrs LK, et al.Neonatology. 2019 Mar 19;116(1):17-19.

Impact of Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole Urinary Tract Infection Prophylaxis on Non-UTI Infections.

Desai S, et al.Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 Apr;38(4):396-397.

Sleep Problems in Children With Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities: A Brief Report.

Valicenti-McDermott M, et al.J Child Neurol. 2019 Mar 17:883073819836541.

A Validated Scale for Assessing the Severity of Acute Infectious Mononucleosis.

Katz BZ, et al.J Pediatr. 2019 Mar 7.

Effect of Sustained Inflations vs Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation on Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia or Death Among Extremely Preterm Infants: The SAIL Randomized Clinical Trial.

Kirpalani H, et al. JAMA. 2019 Mar 26;321(12):1165-1175.

High-Dose Vitamin D Supplementation During Pregnancy and Asthma in Offspring at the Age of 6 Years.

Brustad N, et al. JAMA. 2019 Mar 12;321(10):1003-1005.

High-Dose Vitamin D Supplementation Does Not Prevent Allergic Sensitization of Infants.

Rosendahl J, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Mar 19. pii: S0022-3476(19)30245-8.

Timing of introduction of allergenic solids for infants at high risk.

Abrams EM, et al. Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Feb;24(1):56-57.

The Effects of Early Nutritional Interventions on the Development of Atopic Disease in Infants and Children: The Role of Maternal Dietary Restriction, Breastfeeding, Hydrolyzed Formulas, and Timing of Introduction of Allergenic Complementary Foods.

Greer FR, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Mar 18. pii: e20190281.

Efficacy of primary treatment with immunoglobulin plus ciclosporin for prevention of coronary artery abnormalities in patients with Kawasaki disease predicted to be at increased risk of non-response to intravenous immunoglobulin (KAICA): a randomised controlled, open-label, blinded-endpoints, phase 3 trial.

Hamada H, et al. Lancet. 2019 Mar 16;393(10176):1128-1137.

Pediatric Celiac Disease and Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Outcome of Dietary Therapy.

Patton T, et al. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2019 Mar 26.

Host and Bacterial Markers that Differ in Children with Cystitis and Pyelonephritis.

Shaikh N, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Mar 21. pii: S0022-3476(19)30027-7.

Montelukast and Neuropsychiatric Events in Children with Asthma: A Nested Case-Control Study.

Glockler-Lauf SD, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Mar 21. pii: S0022-3476(19)30198-2.

Physical Fitness, Physical Activity, and the Executive Function in Children with Overweight and Obesity.

Mora-Gonzalez J, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Mar 19. pii: S0022-3476(18)31745-1.

Does discharging clinically well patients after one hour of treatment impact emergency department length of stay for asthma patients.

Lenko D, et al. J Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Mar 20.

Characterization of Esophageal Motility in Infants with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia using High Resolution Manometry.

Rayyan M, et al. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2019 Mar 5.

Effect of metronome guidance on infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Kim CW, et al. Eur J Pediatr. 2019 Mar 8.

Expressions of Gratitude and Medical Team Performance.

Riskin A, Bamberger P, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Mar 7.

A cohort study of intranasal fentanyl for procedural pain management in neonates.

McNair C, et al. Paediatr Child Health. 2018 Dec;23(8):e170-e175.

Traumatic brain injury in young children with isolated scalp haematoma.

Bressan S, et al. Arch Dis Child. 2019 Mar 4.

Association of Atopic Dermatitis With Sleep Quality in Children.

Ramirez FD, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 Mar 4:e190025.

3. Guidelines and best evidence

Prevention of Drowning.

Denny SA, et al.Pediatrics. 2019 Mar 15.

Lack of Sleep and Sports Injuries in Adolescents: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Gao B, et al. J Pediatr Orthop. 2018 Nov 28.

Guidelines for vitamin K prophylaxis in newborns.

Ng E, et al. Paediatr Child Health. 2018 Sep;23(6):394-402.

School, child care and camp exclusion policies for chickenpox: A rational approach.

Bridger NA. Paediatr Child Health. 2018 Sep;23(6):420-427.

4. Case reports

An 11-Month-Old Male With Acute-Onset Left-Sided Facial Paralysis.

Posa M, et al.Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2019 Mar 22:9922819837354.

A Lower-limb Skin Lesion in a 10-year-old Girl.

Koirala A, et al. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 Apr;38(4):e79.

Exercise-Induced Purpura in Children.

Paul SS, et al.Pediatrics. 2019 Apr;143(4).

 

If we have missed out on something useful or you think other articles are absolutely worth sharing, please add them in the comments!

Please join us for our next #DFTB_JC on twitter…The DFTB/ADC Journal Club is a monthly collaboration between @DFTBubbles and @ADC_BMJ featuring a FREE access article from the latest issues of Archives of Disease of Childhood.