Virtual Reality: Camilla Sorensen at DFTB19

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Virtual Reality: Camilla Sorensen at DFTB19, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.21504

Imagine a world where you could teach CPR from a thousand miles away, a world where you can guide clinicians on the other side of the world. In this groundbreaking talk from DFTB19 Camilla Sørensen tackles another side of virtual reality. This one involves the clinician as power user.

 

 

©Ian Summers

(Editor’s note – I was so excited when I watched this talk that I promptly bought myself a VR headset)

 

This talk was recorded live at DFTB19 in London, England. With the theme of  “The Journey” we wanted to consider the journeys our patients and their families go on, both metaphorical and literal. DFTB20 will be held in Brisbane, Australia.

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

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Be productive and indistractible

Cite this article as:
Tessa Davis. Be productive and indistractible, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.21430

I love my phone (iPhone X) and I love my laptop (MacBook Pro 13″). But their aim is to enhance my productivity and not to detract from it. As apps, tech, and the way we communicate have evolved over the last 5 years, have we (or have I) evolved to handle them?

A wrinkle in time: Kerry Woolfall at DFTB19

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. A wrinkle in time: Kerry Woolfall at DFTB19, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.21185

Kerry Woolfall is a social scientist and senior lecturer at the University of Liverpool. This talk, our second from the PERUKI track, she talks about doing research without prior parent and patient consent.  Following legislative changes in 2008 it is now possible (in the UK at least) to enter a child into a trial of potentially life-saving treatment then seek consent after the fact. But how would parents react to this? How would clinicians? What would happen if a child died during the trial, as may understandably occur if we are looking at potentially life-saving interventions?

This talk is not just about a researchers point of view but also details Kerry’s experience from the other side of the clipboard as a NICU parent.

The research embodies a core principle of engagement.

 

You can read some of the research here.

 

Woolfall K, Young B, Frith L, Appleton R, Iyer A, Messahel S, Hickey H, Gamble C. Doing challenging research studies in a patient-centred way: a qualitative study to inform a randomised controlled trial in the paediatric emergency care setting. BMJ open. 2014 May 1;4(5):e005045.

Woolfall K, Frith L, Gamble C, Gilbert R, Mok Q, Young B. How parents and practitioners experience research without prior consent (deferred consent) for emergency research involving children with life threatening conditions: a mixed method study. BMJ open. 2015 Sep 1;5(9):e008522.

 

You can follow Kerry on Twitter here.

 

 

#DoodleMed below by @char_durand

 

This talk was recorded live at DFTB19 in London, England. With the theme of  “The Journey” we wanted to consider the journeys our patients and their families go on, both metaphorical and literal. DFTB20 will be held in Brisbane, Australia.

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

iTunes Button
 

 

Blood Lactate: Freshly Squeezed

Cite this article as:
Alasdair Munro. Blood Lactate: Freshly Squeezed, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.20682

Hermione is a 15-day old baby girl brought in for prolonged jaundice. She is breastfed and has no other risk factors. Her examination is normal other than being a bit on the yellow side. You ask the nurse to perform a blood gas to check her bilirubin, which is below 200. You notice the lactate on the gas is 4, but the nurse reports it was a “squeezed sample” which she suggests could explain the result?

Practice made perfect?

Cite this article as:
Sonia Twigg. Practice made perfect?, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.20694

Okay, perhaps  not perfect but we think these bite sized chunks of simulation from Children’s Health Queensland are pretty good! They are free to download and play with. You can find access to all current OPTIMUS resources here. Enjoy!

 

Introducing BONUS – A Bank of Independently Useful Sims

 

 

 

What are they?

OPTIMUS BONUS is an ongoing project driven by Children’s Health Queensland involving the creation of simulation education packages on topics in paediatric resuscitation.  Each package contains;

  • An introduction by an expert explaining why the topic is important.
  • A simulation with clear learning objectives, instructions and hints for debriefing.
  • Pre-reading resources for participants. These are fun and easy to read resources including podcasts, videos, guidelines and apps.
  • An infographic summarising the topic. QR codes on the posters link to Just In Time Training resources including videos and guidelines.  Just point the camera on your smart phone at the poster and a link will appear to the website to see the video.

 

Who writes them?

The STORK team (Simulation Training Optimising Resuscitation in Kids) from Children’s Health Queensland provides simulation based education throughout Queensland.  We provide two courses as part of our OPTIMUS curriculum; Optimus CORE (for first responders) and Optimus PRIME (for mid phase care while awaiting retrieval).

 

 Why did we make them?

 

What we love about them

  • They’re free to download, expert reviewed, repeatedly tested and assessed by a statewide advisory group to ensure we’re providing a quality product.
  • Our infographics look awesome, summarise the key messages, are easy to share on social media and easy to store on your phone.
  • Some packages contain Just in Time Training JITT resources and videos via QR codes to give you the info you need when you need it :
    • Just scan the QR codes on your phone to see refresher videos before you go and perform that skill
  • We’ve curated great open access #FOAMed resources on paediatric topics for each Simulation, so you can deep dive into more learning before or after the Sim!

 

Love the simulations and want to help out?

Thanks!  We need your help to share these simulations and infographics online any way you can. Shout out to @childhealthqld @LankyTwig @Caroelearning @paedsem and @symon_ben on twitter if you’re using them!

The other thing that REALLY helps is getting good feedback.  So, if you have thoughts on them to share fill out the surveys via the QR codes in the package so we can keep making better simulations to share with the world.

If you’d like to know more, email us at stork@health.qld.gov.au

Other than that, retweet them, share them widely, and help us improve paediatric care everywhere in the world.

 

Enjoy!

Sonia and the BONUS team

Dr Sonia Twigg (@LankyTwig), Dr Benjamin Symon (@symon_ben), Dr Carolina Ardino Sarmiento (@caroelearning), Dr Ben Lawton (@paedsem) Ms Louise Dodson and Mrs Tricia Pilotto.

 

Selected references

Case, Nicky, “How to remember anything forever-ish.:  Oct 2018.  Available at: https://ncase.me/remember/

Cheng et al, “Resuscitation Education Science: Educational Strategies to Improve Outcomes from Cardiac Arrest; A Scientific Statement from the American Heart Association.”Circulation 2018; 138: e82-e122. Available at: https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/10.1161/CIR.0000000000000583

Cheng et al, “Highlights from the 2018 AHA Statement on Resuscitation.” June 2018.  Available at: https://canadiem.org/aha-scientific-statement-on-resuscitation-education/

Dubner S.“Freakonomics Radio.  How to become great at just about anything (Ep 244).” Apr 2016.  Available at: https://freakonomics.com/podcast/peak/

Ericsson A,“Peak” Vintage 2017.

Antibiotic stewardship: Amanda Gwee at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Antibiotic stewardship: Amanda Gwee at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.20592

Dr Amanda Gwee is a clinician-scientist fellow in the MCRI Infectious Diseases and Microbiology group. Her area of research interest revolves around the appropriate dosing of antibiotics.

The Medicines Handbook: Simon Craig at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. The Medicines Handbook: Simon Craig at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.20590

Ask any paediatrician what the hardest, tricksiest procedure that you might ever have to perform and they would all be in agreement – calculating drug doses in the middle of a paediatric resuscitation. In this talk Simon Craig, from Monash, takes us through the how we can do better than scratching out rough calculations on the whiteboard at 6am. He asked the key question…

 

 

 

 

 

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story‘ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families.

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

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*Lori was once one of Andy Tagg’s trainees but he is quick to point out that none of the situations depicted are about him.

 

An approach to obesity: Matt Sabin at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. An approach to obesity: Matt Sabin at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.20580

Associate Professor Matt Sabin is the Chief Medical Officer of the Royal Children’s Hospital in Melbourne. It was not in this role that we asked him to speak but rather in his clinical role as a paediatric endocrinologist running the largest tertiary hospital obesity service in Australia.

Exercise induced wheeze: Rob Roseby at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Exercise induced wheeze: Rob Roseby at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.20582

Associate Professor Rob Roseby is a respiratory physician. You might see many adults huffing and puffing around the local park every Sunday, bright red in the face, gasping for breath. This shouldn’t be the case for the children in their charge. In this talk Rob reminds the reluctant athletes in the audience that exercise and sport is good for children – both in terms of mental health and physical health. 

 

So, should we prescribe sport for our younger patients? Does it actually make a difference? And if they can’t play the sport that they love how can we get them back to it? Listen to this talk from Rob to find out how we can make that all important difference

 

 

 

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story‘ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families.

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

iTunes Button
 

 

*Lori was once one of Andy Tagg’s trainees but he is quick to point out that none of the situations depicted are about him.

 

Mentoring in Medicine: Melanie Rule at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Mentoring in Medicine: Melanie Rule at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.20557

Mel Rule is one of the founding members of the extraordinary WRaPEM group. They are a group of passionate educators and clinicians waim to bring back Wellness, Resilience and Performance coaching for the everyday doctor.

Giving Feedback: Lori Chait at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Giving Feedback: Lori Chait at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.20517

When we learn about feedback it is often from the side of the wise expert, the person giving it. Whilst they might be very good at what they do it is worth considering how the person on the receiving end feels. In this talk from 2018 Lori Chait, a paediatric trainee*, reflects on what it is like to be on the receiving end and how we might do a better job.

 

 

 

 

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story‘ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families.

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

iTunes Button
 

 

*Lori was once one of Andy Tagg’s trainees but he is quick to point out that none of the situations depicted are about him.

 

Meet our very first DFTB Fellow…Rebecca Paxton

Cite this article as:
Tessa Davis. Meet our very first DFTB Fellow…Rebecca Paxton, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.20538

Team DFTB is excited to announce that over the next two years we will have six DFTB Fellows working in the Paediatric Emergency Department at the Royal London Hospital with specifically dedicated DFTB time each week. We will introduce you to them all as they start – they are a mix of paediatric and EM trainees, most of whom are at the end of their training, and who come from the UK, Ireland, Australia, and South Africa. Our first DFTB Fellow, Rebecca Paxton, started with us this week. It’s time to meet her and find out what she will be working on…