Trauma, Teams and Tribes: Vic Brazil at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Trauma, Teams and Tribes: Vic Brazil at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.20194

Victoria Brazil is a senior staff specialist at the Gold Coast University Hospital. She is a world renowned expert in the role of simulation in medical education.

Mirror Mirror

Cite this article as:
Andrew Tagg. Mirror Mirror, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.19303

This blog post complements the talk I gave in the closing session of DFTB19. It has been recorded and will be released as FOAMed later in the year.

As part of my ongoing professional development I decided to volunteer for an experiment the Australasian College for Emergency Medicine were running. As a consultant it is really hard to get feedback on how you are doing, both clinically and professionally. You could ask your colleagues face-to-face but how honest an answer are you really going to get? So I enrolled in a pilot multi-source feedback program. Unlike traditional peer feedback and yearly assessments where you receive one-on-one feedback from the head of department, this was was something different.

I had to nominate 15 colleagues to complete an online survey about my professional behaviours. Anonymized to makes sure that things would not be seen as personal. I chose colleagues from all levels of my work life – from interns, registrars, peers, my immediate bosses and the Chief Medical Officer of the hospital. I chose doctors from specialities that I refer to on a regular basis and I chose non-clinical staff too. And in order to increase the actual worth of the project I included some people that I feel that I don’t get on with as well as I could (yes, they do exist!).

The findings were…interesting. There were the usual comments about drinking less coffee and learning to say no, both of which I fail at miserably on a regular basis. And then there was this one.

Now clearly this says more about the author than it does about me, but it did get me thinking about the impact we have in the workplace.

Emotional contagion

Human beings are social animals. We thrive in groups and, despite having had language for approximately 100,000 years, we rely on non-verbal communications to let members of our tribe know how we are feeling.

Charles Darwin, in his three-quel to The Origin of the Species, wrote that, despite their fleeting nature, our emotions are written large on our faces and this process is far beyond our control. But what is more fascinating is what happens when someone witnesses that unbidden display of emotions. Watch someone smile, genuinely smile, a mirror neurons light up in your brain. In a series of fMRI studies Rizzolatti et al. showed that the same are of the brain fires up when you witness an emotional display as if you had experienced it yourself. This reflexive, sub-thalamic response is emotional contagion.

Whilst our emotions influence our physiological state the reverse is also true. If I smile (more on that later) I feel happier. If I frown I feel more sad. And if I cannot frown – perhaps I have succumbed and finally got some botox to rid me of these troublesome wrinkles – then I will actually feel happier. Well, that is what some scientists have found.

Negative states

The problem is that negative states – fear, anger, boredom – are much more readily transmitted than positive ones – kindness, compassion, calm. Perhaps because they often come unbidden and out-of-control they are more likely to leak out before they can be contained.

This can cause major problems in the workplace as a doctor infects all those around them.

The work we do has a high level of emotional labour, moving from high intensity states such as dealing with life-affecting resuscitations to low intensity states of chronic constipation, without pause.

Some people are more susceptible to emotional contagion than others. Take a look at Docherty’s 15 part emotional contagion susceptibility scale and see where you might fall.

Doherty, R. W. (1997). The Emotional contagion scale: A measure of individual differences. Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, 21, pp. 131-154

And if you are the sort of person that finds themselves crying at the movies then you are not alone. I’ve left a little something for you on our YouTube channel for the next time you want to cut loose.

There are some highly infectious people that we can find in any department.

We’ve all met the MAVERICK – the hot shot doctor that thinks they know everything. They don’t need to follow the guidelines because they know better. They can send home the febrile 28 day old because they look fine to them. They can make the half-baked referrals because it’s the end of their shift and they have to get to their beach volleyball game. Besides the team will sort it out.

They make us fearful, nervous, a little afraid. Their arrogance spreads as they achieve more success, until…. They make a mistake. And they will.

So how can we help them? How can we protect ourselves and the department from their contagion? They need to be reminded, gently, that even Tom Cruise wears a safety harness. Guidelines are there for a reason. It’s okay not to agree with them but you have to be able to defend your actions. If you want to go your own way you need the evidence to back you up. Rather than ignore the MAVERICK and allow the worry to fester it’s important to head them off (whilst allowing them to save face). You set the tone!

What about the MOANER? You only have to go into the staff room of an y department in the hospital to spot one of these creatures. They are the ones drawing everyone into their spiral of doom as they complain about so-and-so from X (insert particular out-group here). Before long the rest of the group has been infected but their particular brand of emotional catharsis and everyone begins to moan.

It’s easier to not become one of them than it is to change their mind. This is the time for herd immunity. The more positive people there are in the room the better. Rather than joining in it is time to point out the dangers of stereotypes and labels. And should the opportunity to moan about your lot at work arise then it is time to take the higher ground. Remember, you set the tone!

And finally there is the MAGNET. Years of bad experience has led to a degree of learned helplessness. The more times they have been crushed by the chaos of the system the more they feel it is pointless to do something about it. At the mention of the Q word – the-word-that-should-not-be-named – they predict an apocalypse worse than any Private Frazer could dream up. Equipment will fail, stock will be missing or fall apart and there will be nobody around to help at the critical juncture – all because you said the word q.u.i.e.t.(shhhhh!)

So what can you do? It is time to role model the desired behaviour. You cannot control what is happening outside of your department but you can claw back a little control from the chaos within. At the beginning of every shift I check the key equipment that I might need to make sure it is working, I make sure that nothing is missing and I make sure roles have been allocated before the inevitable happens. I set the tone!

Manipulation?

All of this behaviour, including the examples I give in my talk, could be seen as manipulative, perhaps even a little sly? Teams that have a happier outlook, with members that embrace positive emotional contagion are safer and more efficient. Whereas when experimental psychologists have planted a MOANER as a confederate they found that teams became much less efficient.

Which sort of team would you rather work in?

Selected References

Doherty, R. W. (1997). The Emotional contagion scale: A measure of individual differences. Journal of Nonverbal Behavior, 21, pp. 131-154.

Legal and Ethical Quandaries: Ian Summers at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Legal and Ethical Quandaries: Ian Summers at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18919

When most of us think of ethics and law our eyes roll and we picture Rumpole of the Bailey and quiet Sunday afternoons in front of the television. But his time Ian Summers came up with something unique. Pushing the boundaries of simulation as an educational medium he introduced us to a series of hypotheticals. Take your time to watch rather than just listen to your iDevice. You’ll learn about ethical practice in paediatrics but if you pause, take a step back, and press play again, you’ll see a masterclass of simulation in action.

 

 

 

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story‘ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families.

 

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

 

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Women and Children First?

Cite this article as:
Davis, T et al.. Women and Children First?, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18694

There is an unwritten rule amongst the team at DFTB – equity and equality for all. As conference organizers we have always been proud to have equal gender representation throughout our events – both in terms of keynote speakers and sessional speakers. We took a look at the data to see how common this was in the field of paediatrics. You can see that report here.

I fought the law…

Cite this article as:
David McDonald. I fought the law…, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.17508

I recently attended my forty-year post-graduation reunion – I graduated from Sydney University in September 1978. It was a cheerful night and great to see old friends.  I am still recovering from the humiliating ritual of dancing the Village People YMCA number. (I was the cowboy).

There has been a lot of awareness about medico-legal matters among junior doctors since the Bawa-Garba case. I thought I would share a retrospective view on some aspects of my personal experience interacting with the legal profession over a long career. The medico legal area is so complicated that I will not comment upon specifics other than saying that joining a Medical Defence Organisation (MDO) is essential for any practicing doctor. MDOs know stuff that you will never know.

 

Choosing a Medical Defence Organisation

Choosing a MDO that suits your needs is one of the most important decisions you will make during your career. The decision should be considered carefully as not all insurance companies are the same. I recommend a Mutual Defence Organisation (MDO) that is not necessarily a part of a large commercial insurance company.  I have remained with the same company very successfully with all the ups and downs for over forty years.  A good Mutual Defence Organisation has the commitment to care about the doctor’s personal welfare as well as the other legal matters. The good ones have experienced and sympathetic medical advisors, and you will need their emotional support as well as expertise if things get sticky.

A public hospital has its own insurance to cover claims for financial compensation made by patients against it. Legally, the employer hospital is liable for its employees, so the cover extends to resident staff. But such staff may be the subject of other, personal, types of legal situations such as HCCC complaints and coronial inquiries and whatever help the hospital may provide is discretionary. You cannot assume that the hospital will provide representation for you personally. A colleague of mine had assistance denied only a short time before an inquest where his management was a focus of attention. An MDO will provide assistance in these other legal situations.

 

How do you manage if you hear that you are being involved in a legal matter?

 This is one of the most stressful things that can occur for a doctor so be prepared in advance. Step 1 is to find a good experienced mentor that suits your personal style as early as possible in your career and before bad stuff has happened. There are differences between a supervisor and a mentor. A supervisor is appointed by the hospital administration, whereas you can choose your own mentor. Accordingly, a mentor is a better fit for your personality and aspirations. Sensible mentors recognise that being asked to mentor a junior colleague is a compliment in the Hippocratic tradition, and don’t mind helping when approached. You don’t have to propose formally.

If you do hear that you are being involved or sued, contact your MDO immediately. You will need emotional support from understanding contacts like your mentor or peer colleagues. This support may come from your partner; however non-medical partners may not understand the paradigm completely. It is difficult when you “put yourself out there” doing what you hope is the very best for your patients, usually because have a great deal of internal self-drive, and then have the whole thing turn into a mess. Also, you may reasonably wish to quarantine work stuff and home stuff, especially if you have a young family.

Friends and colleagues that have been sued often say it is the reassurance and support of their colleagues who remind them that “you really are a good doctor” that is most helpful. In addition to your mentor and colleagues, consider professional support from your organisations Employee Assistance Program. Most of all, do not personalise it excessively nor let it affect your sense of self or enjoyment of your profession. Many people that have been through the difficult journey find that they emerge with a greater sense of destiny and fulfilment and greater skill and knowledge.  It takes some effort and luck to get to that point.

If you do have to attend court get specific orientation and support from your MDO. Be prepared – you may be permitted to carry your notes into the witness stand and read from them, for example. Know what type of proceedings that you are giving evidence -is it Criminal or civil? At all times, with or without a lawyer’s help, you must tell the truth about the facts and not be evasive (e.g. if you did tell a superior about something), even if the truth may not help others.

 

How is medical conduct adjudicated?

The Bawa-Garba case showed that doctor’s performance is judged “on the facts of that specific case”. That principle was a factor in why the Bawa-Garba case judgement appeared so unreasonably harsh. Despite the sadness of the whole affair, the court took the view based on the bare facts of the case that the management of the patient was well below reasonable professional standards. Mitigation for prolonged shift length/personal situation was not a consideration.

It means that if you are in a situation where you believe that workplace practices impair your ability to practice safely, consider raising a paper trail or at least initiate a discussion that objectively states your concerns with your supervisor. Situations could include excessive clinical workload or roster lengths, systematically poor communication, unavailable supervision, or being directed to provide care or undertake a procedure that is outside your level of expertise.

 

Workplace matters

Workplace matters are another area that MDOs can be very worthwhile. There is the potential for an enormous range of conflicts or difficulties. I was once threatened with substantial legal action for defamation by another clinician following a complaint I made to a teaching hospital about the medical care that was provided to one of my patients. It was a difficult time. I was able to deter the threatened defamation action with the assistance of my MDO. My painful teaching lesson was that “You can express an opinion and relate facts about what happened but don’t be malicious, and tell the truth”.

Your MDO can assist with workplace disputes such as bullying and harassment from staff or patients, or if you are accused of that. There are processes in place for this and many other workplace scenarios of which you may not be aware. An example could be if you feel the need to withdraw from providing medical care to a patient if they are harassing you. That needs a number of carefully calibrated steps including making satisfactory to the patient alternative arrangements for care.

Medical insurance does not substitute for a professional organisation such as ASMOF or the AMA and all doctors should belong to one of these.

 

Root cause analyses

NSW Health does have a process for misadventure called Root Cause Analysis (RCA), and most Public Health Organisations have similar processes. They are supposed to look at systems rather than individuals. They have legal privilege and confidential recommendations, although the information can leak out. RCAs can be a useful means of improving patient care. Even if it is difficult I advise honest engagement with this process. RCAs are humbling and stressful. If there is senior medical staff engagement and diligent exploration of the facts, clinically useful outcomes are possible.

 

Expert certificates and reports

There are some differences between an “Expert Certificate” and an “Expert Report”. An Expert Certificate is prepared for the court by doctors involved in a case, such as for the Coroner. Any grade of doctor can be approached. Senior doctors are much more likely to be approached to write expert reports, which may seek review of a case that they did not personally manage. In both areas, sticking carefully to the facts of the case is crucial, and not being tempted to step outside your area of expertise or to conjecture. A skilful barrister can make even the most caring doctor look pretty stupid in the witness stand. In both circumstances look at them as an objective means of assisting the court, and not representing or supporting any individual. Don’t run the risk of appearing biased (or excessively sympathetic to a colleague).

 

If you are asked to provide a mandated expert certificate I would advise that is done with the assistance of your MDO. Expert reports are generally a request rather than a directive. Although agreeing to write an expert report is “doing the right thing”, it exposes the doctor to what may not be a nice experience. You need to ask what it will involve for you e.g. being subpoenaed to court, maybe having to attend joint conferences with other experts. Enquire about fees and a timeline for “when you will be paid”. I personally accept those expert report requests with my eyes wide open, and agree to cooperate if the matter is of sufficient merit, the request is put reasonably and originates from a reputable source (such as a MDO).

 

Dealing with legal profession is stressful but it is also a crucial part of our professional responsibility. An important lesson from the Bawa-Garba case is that it is essential for any doctor of any grade to be a member of a good Medical Defence Organisation. Ask your senior colleagues about their experience. Choose your MDO carefully – you could be married to them for life.

DFTB go to New York

Cite this article as:
Andrew Tagg. DFTB go to New York, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.17016

I first heard of the FemInEM crew in Dublin. Dara Kass, Jenny Beck-Esmay and Stacey Poznanski took to the stage to talk about the birth of FemInEM, first as a blog then as a resource to effect change in the conversation around gender and equity in emergency medicine. Since then they have grown to be a leading voice in this area.

Their first sell out conference, FIX17, in New York brought together a unique set of voices and when the call came out for pitches to speak at FIX18 I thought it would be the perfect place for me to tell a story. This blog post isn’t about my tale – you can read A short story about deathand life here – but about something else.

I consider myself well-travelled, having spent almost 5 years of my life working as a doctor on board cruise ships, but hearing the talks at FIX18 made me realise I a still living in my own little bubble. Everything I hear via Twitter or other forms of social media comes pre-filtered by the source. So if I only follow white hetero-males they inform my worldview. The conference reminded me that there are other voices and other realities.

 

Sex and gender

In a conference where I was clearly in the minority, I was constantly reminded of things I have just taken for granted. Nick Gorton, a transman,  really opened my eyes when he told the audience that life had been like playing a video game on hard mode then, when he became a man, everything just switched over to easy. Look out for his great talk when it comes out…

 

Race

You only have to read the newspaper headlines on any given day to see how race plays a role in the public perception of a person. To hear Arabia Mollette say that she will never be seen as a woman first when she walks into a room because she is a person of colour made me feel uncomfortable. I’d like to think that I don’t see the world that way, but we all have our implicit biases. Don’t think you are biased? Then try out one of the Harvard Implicit Bias tests over at Project Implicit.

 

Privilege

A lot of medics come from a place of privilege, parents with degree level education and jobs that pay well. Many have parents that are, or were, doctors.  Regina Royan spoke of a different type of upbringing, of families struggling to make ends meet, and of the hidden challenges this brings from the start of medical training – not just in the shockingly high costs to apply to medical school in the US but also on things like electives and placements away from your home base.

 

I have lived, comfortably, within my own little bubble of existence. FemInEM has challenged me to expand my worldview, to listen to dissenting voices, and ask more questions.

 

For more accounts of FIX18 then read these accounts…

Penny Wilson – Getting my feminist FIX in New York

Shannon MacNamara – Telling stories to FIX things

Annie Slater – We support, We Amplify, We Promote

 

A short story about death…

Cite this article as:
Andrew Tagg. A short story about death…, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.16636

This is the first of a two-part post based on my talk for FIX18 entitled A short story about death and life… We’ll publish the second part tomorrow.

 

“Someone will be along in a minute to explain what is going on”

Then a minute became two, three, five, until fifteen silent minutes had passed, each one seemingly longer than the last. Then footsteps…

It must have taken her an hour to cross the floor, or maybe just 30 seconds, I don’t know. I was no longer there.

I’m sorry, Mr. Tagg, I’ve got some bad news for you….Despite our best efforts, we were unable….

Her words disappeared and floated away with our dreams and I was lost.

That was how I had found out that my daughter had died. It was a tragic accident, the result of an unexpected antepartum haemorrhage and  an unsuccessful neonatal resuscitation. Something happened that day that fundamentally changed me, not just as a person, but as a doctor.

Flashbulb memories

Memory is imprecise – even in times of extreme emotion when it feels like every frame is burnt into your retina like the after image of photograph. These flashbulb memories have been heavily studied by psychologists and Malcolm Gladwell gives an easy to understand rundown in this episode of Revisionist History. What is most fascinating to me is that they are not always correct. So what does that mean of my recollection of the events that August?

The rarity of neonatal resuscitation

According to the Australian Bureau of Statistics a baby is born every 1 minute 42 seconds. That equates to around 8000 babies a day. Unfortunately, 7.2 per 1000 babies are stillborn and there are 2.4 neonatal deaths per 1000 live births. So in the whole of Australia, there are up to 19 neonatal deaths every single day.*

Most of us attend a delivery and never expect to resuscitate an infant. When we do a waft of oxygen is often all that is required. A Dutch study showed that around 2.6% of all births via elective caesarean required supplemental oxygen, around 1% require bag-valve-mask ventilation of some sort and only 0.1% require any more intensive resuscitation. The rates are much higher in lower/middle income countries.

Because they are such a rare event most doctors never expect to have to deal with a fatal outcome. Just as most emergency physicians obsess over the rarest of events, the surgical airway, perhaps those of us that may potentially be present at birth should be prepared to do what is necessary?

*A neonatal death is one that occurs within 28 days of birth

 

Absence does not make the heart grow fonder

A lot has already been written about the benefits and challenges of parental presence during the management of a critically ill child. To get you up to speed then read this post from Natalie May over on St Emlyns. The Resuscitation Council (UK) seems to think it is a good idea and most literature focuses on parental presence in either the ICU or ED setting and in an older cohort.

An exploratory interview study by Harvey and Pattison identified four key concerns surrounding the presence of the father during neonatal resuscitation in the delivery suite.

  • Whose job is it to support them?
  • What should they say or do?
  • The importance of teamwork
  • Impact on the healthcare practitioner

Think about the last time you did any neonatal life support training? No doubt you focussed on the core clinical skills – airway, breathing, circulation – with very little if no mention of dealing with the parents.

Medicine has moved on from beneficient paternalism to a more patient/parent-centred approach. It can be a hard decision to make – stay or go – but it doesn’t have to be the clinician’s choice.

Being present at a neonatal resuscitation can also be distressing for the staff involved and so one can understand how medical teams might want to shield parents from the hurt. There is concern that caregivers might interfere or get in the way with treatment. A skilled guide, such as a social worker or trained nurse, can help explain what is going on and translate the complex medical into plain English.

 

‘They’ll always remember how you made them feel”

In a time when infant death was a common occurrence, the prevailing thought was that grief could be avoided by preventing mothers from seeing their stillborn children. Psychologists would later theorize that an attachment bond had not been formed and so whisking the baby away without ceremony would cause no harm. By the 1970s this theory had been thrown out the window and grieving parents were offered the opportunity to see their children. Perhaps now the attachment bond is formed even earlier, through the use of antenatal screening, regular ultrasound scans and midwife visits making grief even more palpable.

 

The traditional (if flawed) Kubler-Ross model of grief

There will always be questions after an unexpected death – some can be answered and some can never be. But is important for parents to have the opportunity to ask. A qualitative study by Bakhbahki and colleagues in the South West of England identified a number of parental concerns centred around the framework of transparency, flexibility, inclusivity, and positivity.

We want to know that there is a perinatal mortality review process and how it works. As one of the interviewed stated, they wanted to know “this is how your child died and this is how we investigate it“. Parents wanted to know that this process was multidisciplinary involving not just neonatologists or paediatricians but also the obstetricians in order to identify any factors that may future tragic events.

We want our children to be treated like any child should be treated – with respect – regardless of whether they are alive or dead.

“The most distressing thing for me was knowing that she had been stripped of her blanket and photographed before I even had the chance to hold her.”

E.T. – a bereaved mother

There is a stigma attached to the death of a child. Society, whether it means to or not, sees the death of a child as a failure on the part of the mother. She must have done something wrong in pregnancy, she must have broken the rules. Then, these women are isolated from other newborns and their parents to the extent that they may even receive sub-optimal care.

An alternate view

It has been 8 years now and I have progressed far enough in my career to be the one bearing bad news. As an emergency physician who deals with a lot of sick and critically unwell adults, I have gone out of my way to seek formal training on breaking bad news. Specialties, such as obstetrics and paediatrics, are not exposed to death and dying on such a routine basis and very few have received formal training.

So what could be done better?

Whilst being an emotionally distant automaton may afford some protection for the clinician it is important that those breaking bad news are humans first, doctors second. I’ve written before about the power of kindness and this is one of those moments when we need to stop, look, listen and think. The death of a child, any child, is a devastating event and should be acknowledged as such.

 

With thanks to Tess (for letting me share our story) and my big-hearted cheer squad (Tessa, Ben, Henry, Tanya, Genevieve, Ian, and Ross)

Selected References

The rarity of neonatal resuscitation

*De Luca R, Boulvain M, Irion O, Berner M, Pfister RE. Incidence of early neonatal mortality and morbidity after late-preterm and term cesarean delivery. Pediatrics. 2009 Jun 1;123(6):e1064-71.

Kerber KJ, Mathai M, Lewis G, Flenady V, Erwich JJ, Segun T, Aliganyira P, Abdelmegeid A, Allanson E, Roos N, Rhoda N. Counting every stillbirth and neonatal death through mortality audit to improve quality of care for every pregnant woman and her baby. BMC pregnancy and childbirth. 2015 Dec;15(2):S9.

Knight M, Draper ES, Kurinczuk JJ. Key messages from the UK Perinatal Confidential Enquiry into term, singleton, intrapartum stillbirth and intrapartum-related neonatal death 2017.

Lawn JE, Lee AC, Kinney M, Sibley L, Carlo WA, Paul VK, Pattinson R, Darmstadt GL. Two million intrapartum‐related stillbirths and neonatal deaths: where, why, and what can be done?. International Journal of Gynecology & Obstetrics. 2009 Oct 1;107(Supplement):S5-19.

Lee AC, Cousens S, Wall SN, Niermeyer S, Darmstadt GL, Carlo WA, Keenan WJ, Bhutta ZA, Gill C, Lawn JE. Neonatal resuscitation and immediate newborn assessment and stimulation for the prevention of neonatal deaths: a systematic review, meta-analysis and Delphi estimation of mortality effect. BMC public health. 2011 Dec;11(3):S12.

Richmond S, Wyllie J. European resuscitation council guidelines for resuscitation 2010 section 7. Resuscitation of babies at birth. Resuscitation. 2010 Oct 1;81(10):1389-99.

Wilmink FA, Hukkelhoven CW, Lunshof S, Mol BW, van der Post JA, Papatsonis DN. Neonatal outcome following elective cesarean section beyond 37 weeks of gestation: a 7-year retrospective analysis of a national registry. American journal of obstetrics and gynecology. 2010 Mar 1;202(3):250-e1.

Wyllie J, Bruinenberg J, Roehr CC, Rüdiger M, Trevisanuto D, Urlesberger B. European Resuscitation Council Guidelines for Resuscitation 2015: Section 7. Resuscitation and support of transition of babies at birth. Resuscitation. 2015 Oct 1;95:249-63.

 

Absence does not make the heart grow fonder

Boie ET, Moore GP, Brummett C, Nelson DR. Do parents want to be present during invasive procedures performed on their children in the emergency department? A survey of 400 parents. Annals of emergency medicine. 1999 Jul 1;34(1):70-4.

Cacciatore J, Rådestad I, Frederik Frøen J. Effects of contact with stillborn babies on maternal anxiety and depression. Birth. 2008 Dec;35(4):313-20.

Fulbrook P, Latour JM, Albarran JW. Paediatric critical care nurses’ attitudes and experiences of parental presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation: a European survey. International journal of nursing studies. 2007 Sep 1;44(7):1238-49.

Harvey ME, Pattison HM. The impact of a father’s presence during newborn resuscitation: a qualitative interview study with healthcare professionals. BMJ open. 2013 Jan 1;3(3):e002547.

Nederstigt I, Van Tol D. Parental presence during resuscitation. Resuscitation. 2008 May 1;77:S61.

Offord RJ. Should relatives of patients with cardiac arrest be invited to be present during cardiopulmonary resuscitation?. Intensive and Critical Care Nursing. 1998 Dec 1;14(6):288-93.

Sawyer A, Ayers S, Bertullies S, Thomas M, Weeks AD, Yoxall CW, Duley L. Providing immediate neonatal care and resuscitation at birth beside the mother: parents’ views, a qualitative study. BMJ open. 2015 Sep 1;5(9):e008495.

Tripon C, Defossez G, Ragot S, Ghazali A, Boureau-Voultoury A, Scépi M, Oriot D. Parental presence during cardiopulmonary resuscitation of children: the experience, opinions and moral positions of emergency teams in France. Archives of disease in childhood. 2014 Jan 6:archdischild-2013.

 

‘They’ll always remember how you made them feel”

Badenhorst W, Riches S, Turton P, Hughes P. The psychological effects of stillbirth and neonatal death on fathers: Systematic review. Journal of Psychosomatic Obstetrics & Gynecology. 2006 Jan 1;27(4):245-56.

Bakhbakhi D, Siassakos D, Burden C, Jones F, Yoward F, Redshaw M, Murphy S, Storey C. Learning from deaths: Parents’ Active Role and ENgagement in The review of their Stillbirth/perinatal death (the PARENTS 1 study). BMC pregnancy and childbirth. 2017 Dec;17(1):333.

Bonanno GA, Kaltman S. The varieties of grief experience. Clinical psychology review. 2001 Jul 1;21(5):705-34.

Boyle FM, Vance JC, Najman JM, Thearle MJ. The mental health impact of stillbirth, neonatal death or SIDS: prevalence and patterns of distress among mothers. Social science & medicine. 1996 Oct 1;43(8):1273-82.

Flenady V, Boyle F, Koopmans L, Wilson T, Stones W, Cacciatore J. Meeting the needs of parents after a stillbirth or neonatal death. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology. 2014 Sep;121:137-40.

Flenady V, King J, Charles A, Gardener G, Ellwood D, Day K, et al.PSANZ Clinical practice guideline for perinatal mortality. Perinatal Mortality Group https:// www.psanzpnmsig.org.au. Perinatal Society of Australia and New Zealand, April 2009; Vol. Version 2.2.

Koopmans L, Wilson T, Cacciatore J, Flenady V. Support for mothers, fathers and families after perinatal death. Cochrane database of systematic reviews. 2013(6).

Mills TA, Ricklesford C, Cooke A, Heazell AE, Whitworth M, Lavender T. Parents’ experiences and expectations of care in pregnancy after stillbirth or neonatal death: a metasynthesis. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology. 2014 Jul 1;121(8):943-50.

Nuzum D, Meaney S, O’donoghue K. The impact of stillbirth on consultant obstetrician gynaecologists: a qualitative study. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics & Gynaecology. 2014 Jul 1;121(8):1020-8.

 

Are there too few women presenting at paediatric conferences?

Cite this article as:
Davis, T. et al. Are there too few women presenting at paediatric conferences?, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.16879

Sometimes we have a great idea for a paper but try as we might we cannot get it published in the traditional way. So what better means of disseminating knowledge than publishing it right here, on the Don’t Forget the Bubbles website? Given that this is the week of FIX18, the Feminem Idea eXchange, it seems like there is no better time like the present to discuss female presenters at paediatric conferences.

Tim Horeczko: Towards A Calmer Resus at DFTB17

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Tim Horeczko: Towards A Calmer Resus at DFTB17, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.16235

This talk was recorded live during the final plenary session of DFTB17 in Brisbane. If you missed out in 2017 then you can check out our YouTube channel to watch any of the talks.

Tips for new consultants

Cite this article as:
Tessa Davis. Tips for new consultants, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.16153

The end of my training finally arrived and I’m preparing to move on to the next (and longest) stage of my career – being a consultant. I asked friends, and Twitter, for advice on becoming a consultant. Here’s a summary of the main #tipsfornewconsultants.

 

Jonny Taitz: Patient Safety at DFTB17

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Jonny Taitz: Patient Safety at DFTB17, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.15912

This talk was recorded live on the final day of DFTB17 in Brisbane. If you missed out in 2017 then why not book your leave for 2018 now. Tickets are on sale for the pre-conference workshops as well as the conference itself at www.dftb18.com.