You want how much?!

Cite this article as:
Lawton, B. You want how much?!, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
http://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.15798

In discussion with your local PICU you have decided you are going to have to intubate the septic 11 month old in front of you. You know what you need; a fluid bolus, an adrenaline infusion, then a little bit of ketamine and some rocuronium, with push dose adrenaline on the side just in case….

Can Point-of-Care CRP testing identify children with serious infection?

Cite this article as:
Davis, T. Can Point-of-Care CRP testing identify children with serious infection?, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
http://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.15806

As paediatric emergency clinicians, a large part of our job is identifying the child with a serious infection. The utility of blood tests in helping with diagnosis in this group of children is debatable. Could point-of-care CRP testing help identify children with serious infection?

Neither Here Nor There at DFTB17

Cite this article as:
DFTB, T. Neither Here Nor There at DFTB17, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
http://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.15749

This talk was recorded live on the second day at DFTB17 in Brisbane. If you missed out in 2017 then why not book your leave for 2018 now. Tickets are on sale for the pre-conference workshops as well as the conference itself at www.dftb18.com.

Focus on PEM POCUS

Cite this article as:
Snelling, C. Focus on PEM POCUS, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
http://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.15772

Point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) is a disruptive technology that has the potential to change the standard way children are evaluated and managed, particularly in the paediatric emergency medicine (PEM) department.  POCUS is a complex skill that needs to be broken down into bite sized components and the aim of this new DFTB series will give you…

Antibiotics for all?

Cite this article as:
Tagg, A. Antibiotics for all?, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
http://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.15679

Sometimes a paper is published that makes you stop dead in your tracks. In this post-truth era we are so used to reading headlines that sound too good to be true that we just skip over them. But this paper was published in the reputable New England Journal of Medicine.