Potassium abnormalities

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Hypokalaemia 

K + < 2.5 mmol/L:

  • Prominent U wave develops with apparent prolongation of the QTc
  • Flat or diphasic T waves
  • ST segment depression

As K + falls further:

  • PR interval prolongs
  • Sinoatrial block may occur

 

Hyperkalaemia 

As K + rises:

  • Tall peaked T waves, best seen in precordial leads
  • Prolongation of QRS duration
  • Prolongation of PR interval
  • Disappearance of P waves
  • Wide bizarre diphasic QRS complexes (sine waves)
  • Eventual asystole

 

potassium and ecgs

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