Virtual Reality: Camilla Sorensen at DFTB19

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Virtual Reality: Camilla Sorensen at DFTB19, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.21504

Imagine a world where you could teach CPR from a thousand miles away, a world where you can guide clinicians on the other side of the world. In this groundbreaking talk from DFTB19 Camilla Sørensen tackles another side of virtual reality. This one involves the clinician as power user.

 

 

©Ian Summers

(Editor’s note – I was so excited when I watched this talk that I promptly bought myself a VR headset)

 

This talk was recorded live at DFTB19 in London, England. With the theme of  “The Journey” we wanted to consider the journeys our patients and their families go on, both metaphorical and literal. DFTB20 will be held in Brisbane, Australia.

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Be productive and indistractible

Cite this article as:
Tessa Davis. Be productive and indistractible, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.21430

I love my phone (iPhone X) and I love my laptop (MacBook Pro 13″). But their aim is to enhance my productivity and not to detract from it. As apps, tech, and the way we communicate have evolved over the last 5 years, have we (or have I) evolved to handle them?

Pulse oximetry

Cite this article as:
Andrew Tagg. Pulse oximetry, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18145

When a case is presented you probably like to assume aime things are a given – that capillary refill time is a universal constant no matter who performs it, or that the way one person measures the respiratory rate is the same as the next. I’m always a little intrigued as to how things are the way they are, and so this time I’m going to take a closer look at pulse oximetry.

Craig McBride: Minimally Invasive Surgery at DFTB17

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Craig McBride: Minimally Invasive Surgery at DFTB17, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.16078

This talk was recorded live on the final of DFTB17 in Brisbane. If you missed out in 2017 then why not book your leave for 2018 now. Tickets are on sale for the pre-conference workshops as well as the conference itself at www.dftb18.com.

Craig McBride is a paediatric surgeon at Lady Cilento in Brisbane. Here he talks about how we have moved on from the days of maximally invasive surgery when a barber-surgeon was not judged on the neatness of their sutures but on the sharpness of their blade.

Non-specific symptoms in the emergency department

Cite this article as:
Shaarna Shan. Non-specific symptoms in the emergency department, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2017. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.12880

Non-specific symptoms in the emergency department are common: headache, vomiting, lethargy, blurred vision…but do you include a brain tumour in your differential? Are you confident in spotting the signs and symptoms of brain tumour? Are you asking the right questions to know when to reassure, review or refer your patient?

How to be… a twitter moderator

Cite this article as:
Ian Summers. How to be… a twitter moderator, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2017. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.12484

The email comes from a wonderful conference organizer, lets call her, for example, Tessa, “Dear X, would you be interested in being a Twitter moderator for a session at our upcoming conference?”  The idea appeals, but you actually have no idea how it’s done. Google is not much help, but there’s been an amazing conference in Berlin where lots of talented people have been doing it very well. You think surely there must be some sort of guide or reference manual as to how to do it but there’s not. So you ask some of those amazing moderators from Berlin how they did it. Fortunately for you they are happy to tell you. Disaster averted.

Alarm fatigue

Cite this article as:
Andrew Tagg. Alarm fatigue, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2017. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.11810

It is easy to be bamboozled by the amazing technology we have at our fingertips – portable monitors, ultrasound machines, tricorders – but you only really need to know one button. It’s that one we all instinctively reach for before have even assessed the patient. It’s the big button marked “Silence“.

Screen Queens

Cite this article as:
Andrew Tagg. Screen Queens, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2016. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.8492

Life as a parent can be tough – early mornings, convincing your child to eat, having time for yourself. Sometimes you just need five minutes to think.  So what do you do – thrust your mobile device in front of your 3 year old?  Today we explore some of the good, bad and ugly concerns around electronic media.

smartphone distraction

Are smartphones too much of a distraction for doctors?

Cite this article as:
Tessa Davis. Are smartphones too much of a distraction for doctors?, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2014. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.4869

It’s clear that smartphones have much to offer doctors. Up to date information on best management practice; help with dosing calculations; access to recent journal articles; and even communicating with doctors in other specialties or other hospitals for patient care.