Gastroenteritis

Cite this article as:
Angharad Griffiths. Gastroenteritis, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2020. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.28790

Conor is a 10 kg, 13 month-old boy who’s presented to the ED with a 24-hour history of diarrhoea and vomiting.  He has had 5 episodes of non-bloody, non-bilious vomits. Since waking up this morning has two episodes of loose/watery non-bloody malodorous stools. They have not ‘flooded’ the nappy but were quite large.  He is taking sips of fluid (mixtures of water, milk, and juice being offered) and has only eaten half a digestive biscuit so far today.  He has had a fairly large wet nappy last night, but not since, though it’s now difficult to tell as his last nappy was dirty.  He is alert and looking around while being carried but is upset on leaving his mother’s arms.  He cries with tears, has a normal heart rate but his mother is worried about his dry lips.  She was told by a healthcare worker neighbour that he will “need a drip”. CRT, HR, and BP are normal.  His temperature is 37.8.  His nappy is dry and has been on for 3 hours now.  His capillary glucose measurement is 3.2.  You decide he’s probably mildly dehydrated.

Introduction

Gastroenteritis (GE) is the presence or diarrhoea or vomiting (or both) that may or may not be accompanied by fever, abdominal pain and anorexia.  Diarrhoea is the passage of excessively liquidy or frequent stools with liquid high water content.  Although often felt to be a common minor illness presentation, it is a major cause of childhood mortality and morbidity, causing millions of deaths worldwide in children in low and middle-income countries; of all child deaths from gastroenteritis 78% occur in Africa and South-East Asia. 

Gastroenteritis accounts for a huge proportion of GP and ED presentations. In Europe, acute gastroenteritis the third commonest cause of hospital admission, accounting for between 4-17% of admissions.  In Australia, gastroenteritis caused by rotavirus alone accounts for 115,000 GP visits, 22,000 ED visits and 10,000 hospital admissions a year, with an estimated cost of 30m Australian Dollars (£12m, €18m).  In the UK, 20% of GP consultations in the under 5’s are for GE.

It is imperative that the child with gastroenteritis is differentiated from more sinister causes of vomiting.  The presence of diarrhoea is reassuring but doesn’t exclude other intra-abdominal causes.  The same can be said for pain out of proportion with gastroenteritis, distension, peritoneal signs or localised tenderness.

Most cases are not associated with complications but when complications do occur, the commonest are electrolyte disturbance and metabolic acidosis.  Supplementary fluids through oral or intravenous routes are the most effective way to avoid these complications.

Gastroenteritis in low and middle-income countries can present differently, has different aetiologies, is often managed differently, and is a larger burden to healthcare systems in general than in high-income countries.  This post will focus on gastroenteritis in high-income countries. For more information about comparisons of guidelines across the world; Vecchio et al (2016) is an interesting read.

This is not meant to provide a clinical practice guideline; rather an overview of the illness.  Many (if not all!) paediatric emergency departments or general paediatric units have their own guidelines.

Pathophysiology

Worldwide, the commonest causes are viral pathogens, most commonly rotaviruses and noroviruses.  Viral infections cause damage to the small bowel enterocytes with resultant low-grade fevers and watery diarrhoea – classically without blood.  Rotavirus strains are seasonal and vary within different geographical areas.  The peak age for these infections is between 6 months and 2 years.  Children with poor nutrition are at higher risk of acquiring gastroenteritis and developing dehydration and complications.

Children with bacterial gastroenteritis are more likely to have bloody stool.
Escherichia coli and Shigella dysenteriae can be complicated by haemolytic uraemic syndrome (HUS).  This is an acute onset, microangiopathic haemolytic anaemia, thrombocytopaenia, acute renal impairment and multisystem involvement.  (Just to confuse things, HUS can present in the absence of bloody diarrhoea.)

Pathogens can be generalised into four groups:

  • Viral (70% of cases): Rotavirus, Norovirus, Adenovirus, Enterovirus
  • Bacterial (10-20% of cases): Campylobacter jejuni, Salmonella spp, Escherichia coli, Shigella spp, Yersinia enterocolitica.
  • Protozoa (unusual, accounting for <10%): Cryptosporidium, Giardia lamblia, Entamoeba histolytica
  • Helminths (very unusual): Strongyloides stercoralis

Transmission

Pathogens are spread mainly via the faeco-oral route, acquired by ingesting contaminated food or drink.  Water may be contaminated with bacteria, viruses, or protozoa. Undercooked (or inappropriately stored/cooked) meats and seafood are common culprits of bacterial pathogens.  Bacterial contaminants can produce toxins (e.g. Bacillus cereus in re-warmed rice or Staphylococcus aureus in ice-cream).

Pathogens causing gastroenteritis can also be transmitted without the patient being symptomatic.

Assessment

Gastroenteritis is a clinical diagnosis.  Enquire about sick/infectious contacts and potential sources (recent travel, food).  Enquire about the frequency of symptoms and intake of fluids.  Note the frequency of urination.  Note other things that may cause diarrhoea e.g. recent use of enteral antibiotics or chronic constipation with overflow diarrhoea the presenting feature. 

In the presence of signs such as high fever, long duration of symptoms, severe abdominal pain or bilious vomiting; review the diagnosis and do not immediately label as gastroenteritis.

Oral hydration fluids

Most children are not dehydrated and can tolerate oral fluids and so can be managed at home.  Take a look at Nikki Abela’s DFTB19 talk on top tips for a high yield dehydration assessment.

When children are only mildly to moderately dehydrated, as a general rule they can be treated with oral / enteral rehydration with low osmolality oral rehydration solution (ORS).  Worldwide, ORS is recognised as first line therapy and treating mild to moderate dehydration with enteral rehydration is supported by the WHO, European Society for Paediatric Gastroenterology and the American Academy of Paediatrics. The WHO recommends a low osmolality (hypo-osmolar) solution, usually containing sodium, potassium, chloride, carbohydrate (glucose) and a base.  Low osmolarity solutions reduce the need for IV fluids, reduce stool output and reduce vomiting frequency.

But… a major limitation to the use of ORS is its taste – and this is where apple juice comes in. For minimally dehydrated patients, half-strength apple juice is associated with fewer treatment failures compared to ORS and could suit as a more palatable alternative.  Take a look at a sweet summary (pun intended!) of the “apple juice trial”.

Breastfeeding should continue and a child can be supplemented with ORS if this is needed.  Children can go back to a normal diet after the illness has passed.

Enteral (oral / NG) versus IV hydration

Most studies show that enteral rehydration with ORS is just as effective as IV hydration in mild to moderate dehydration with a 2006 Cochrane analysis concluding that enteral rehydration is as effective if not better than IV rehydration with fewer adverse events and a shorter hospital stay.  It is also less invasive (even with NG placement) and anecdotally satisfaction is greater amongst parents.  It is very safe.

Enteral rehydration only fails in approximately 1 in 20-25 children.

Barriers to oral rehydration include unfamiliarity with the benefits, misconception that it takes longer than IV therapy, and that it has a high failure rate.

Contraindications to enteral rehydration include haemodynamic instability, abdominal distension, concern over ileus, absent bowel sounds, or impaired airway reflexes.

IV therapy is more invasive and involves placing and maintaining IV access.  There are also iatrogenic complications including electrolyte disturbance should inappropriate fluids / composition / volume / rate be used. 

But… in severely dehydrated children, put away the ORS and apple juice. They will need IV rehydration as first line.

Antiemetics

How can we support enteral fluids? Well, children who receive Ondansetron are less likely to vomit, have greater oral intake and are less likely to require IV hydration.  A Cochrane review demonstrates that Ondansetron also increases the proportion of children who stop vomiting when compared to placebo [RR1.4] and reduces the proportion of children needing IV therapy (and therefore admission rate) [RR 0.41].  Median length of stay is also shorter in the ED. 

Reported side effects are rare with very few reported side effects other than a few cases of increased frequency of diarrhoea.

Antiemetics alleviate vomiting by acting on the ChemoReceptor Trigger Zone and vomiting centre.  Ondansetron is a 5HT3 receptor antagonist.  This class of antiemetics have fewer adverse effects (than dopamine antagonists, anticholinergics, antihistamines and corticosteroids) and can be safely used in children.  The NICE guideline discusses its off-licence use (at time of publication it’s licence was for post-operative nausea and vomiting and chemotherapy induced vomiting).

Ondansetron prolongs the QT interval.  Recommendations are it should be avoided in those with long QT and should be used in caution where there may be electrolyte imbalance (severe dehydration) or on other QT-prolonging medication.

Ondansetron is relatively cheap  £1.71 for 10 4mg tablets and is available in oro-dispersible form (though these are much more expensive at £36 for 10x4mg tablets) and liquid (£36.82 for 40mg [50ml] bottle).

Probiotics

An ESPGHAN working group position paper on the use of probiotics in acute paediatric gastroenteritis concludes that:

  • Effects seen in clinical trial are probiotic strain specific (this makes ‘trial-life’ difficult to replicate in ‘real-life’).
  • A lack of evidence now doesn’t mean that there won’t be evidence sometime in the future. 
  • Safety profile of certain strains cannot be extrapolated to other strains.
  • Studies that report benefits in certain doses in certain settings have insufficient evidence to support a health benefit at lower doses and different setting.

…the jury’s still out.

Other therapies

Antibiotics and anti-diarrhoeal agents aren’t routinely recommended in the management of paediatric gastroenteritis.

For gastroenteritis in high income countries, the WHO does not recommend adding zinc to a treatment regimen (it is for gastroenteritis in low and middle income countries). 

Investigations

Routine lab testing in mild and moderate gastroenteritis is of little value in these patients and should be avoided unless clinically indicated.

This goes for stool samples too.  Stool cultures are not routinely indicated in immunocompetent children with non-bloody diarrhoea.

Confirmation of viral gastroenteritis after the child has been discharged from the ED, and likely on the road to recovery at home, adds very little to (A) the clinical diagnosis of viral gastroenteritis in the ED, (B) the management plan and (C) the clinical outcome. 

Should the investigation influence management, then stool sampling may be of benefit.  This could be applicable where an outbreak may be suspected in school or creche, where there may be a public health benefit.

Stool samples should be sent in cases of bloody diarrhoea, immunodeficiency and recent foreign travel.

How about tests for dehydration? Sadly there is no one test that correlates clinically with dehydration. Urine specific gravity in infants is unreliable because the kidney reaches adult concentrating abilities after the age of 1.  Also, the child often doesn’t begin urinating until rehydration has begun.

And glucose? Well, almost 10% of GE patients aged 1 month to 5 years in high income countries present with hypoglycaemia.  Risk factors for hypoglycaemia on presentation include a longer duration of vomiting and increased frequency of vomiting.  It would be reasonable to consider point of care glucose testing at triage for young children as identifying hypoglycaemia on clinical ground alone is difficult in this age group. 

Prevention

The key to reducing the burden (and generally for an all-round happier life!) is in the prevention of acute gastroenteritis.  Rotavirus vaccination is now commonplace thought the antibodies, the UK & Ireland and other countries around the world.  It is very effective.

In the home and in the ED…Handwashing, handwashing, handwashing!

Vaccination leads to a profound reduction in presentations and admissions and a fall in overall seasonal workload, often within the first year after the introduction of universal vaccination against rotavirus.  Even though only those under 1 year old are generally vaccinated, it has been shown to contribute to a significant herd effect with fewer cases than expected in older children. In Scotland, where initial vaccine uptake was 93- 94% during the first 2 years, annual rotavirus confirmed gastroenteritis cases fell by 84.7%, bed days reduced by 91% (from 325 to just 29), without any documented cases of intussusception.  Reductions were seen across all age groups despite only infants receiving the vaccine.  Similar results can be seen in other areas of the UK and Ireland.

The not to miss bits

  • Do not assume isolated vomiting in a child is gastroenteritis.  Consider other causes -these very widely from inborn errors of metabolism to diabetes mellitus, surgical obstruction to urinary tract infections. If you’d like to hear more, check out Dani’s talk on vomiting in children in DFTB Essentials.
  • Beware chronic diarrhoea in an infant – do they have malabsorption or is this a presentation of IBD or an immunodeficiency?
  • Beware the non-thriving child with diarrhoea.
  • And beware chronic diarrhoea.

But what happened to Conor?

Conor was given a cup of Dioralyte ORS and his favourite beaker filled with Dioralyte.  His mum was encouraged to give him syringes of 5 mls of Dioralyte frequently or for him to take sips from his beaker and was asked to document on a piece of paper how many he received.  He vomited after 30 minutes of this therapy.

You give him a dose of Ondansetron and place an NG tube and give him 100mls (10ml/kg) over 1 hour after deciding he does not need rapid rehydration but slightly more than normal maintenance.  He then receives maintenance volumes of Dioralyte via his NG, which he tolerates well and then starts to take his own sips from his beaker.

He does not vomit in the ED again, has one episode of loose stools, passes urine, and is tolerating fluids orally.  He’s smiling at you! You feel he can be discharged and council his mum regarding regular fluid intake, choice of fluids, of any red flags, and encouraged to return in the event of any concern.

Conor’s Dad calls to say that Conor’s 3 year old sister at home is now vomiting too!  But it’s OK – He’s not too worried about her and Conor’s Mum has advised his Dad to start giving her regular sips of Dioralyte at home…

References

Colletti JE, Brown KM, Sharieff GQ, Barata IA, Ishimine P. The Management of Children with Gastroenteritis and Dehydration in the Emergency Department. J Emerg Med [Internet]. 2010;38(5):686–98. Available from: https://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jemermed.2008.06.015

Elliott EJ. Acute gastroenteritis in children. Br Med J. 2007;334(7583):35–40.

Vecchio A Lo, Dias A, Berkley JA, Boey C, Cohen MB, Cruchet S, et al. Comparison of Recommendations in Clinical Practice Guidelines for Acute Gastroenteritis in Children. Gastroenterology. 2016;63(2):226–35.

Freedman SB, Willan AR, Boutis K, Schuh S. Effect of dilute apple juice and preferred fluids vs electrolyte maintenance solution on treatment failure among children with mild gastroenteritis: A randomized clinical trial. JAMA – J Am Med Assoc. 2016;315(18):1966–74.

BK F, A H, JC C. Enteral vs Intravenous regydration therapy for children with gastroenteritis: A meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials. Arch Paediatr Adolesc. 2004;158(1):483–90.

Hartling L, Bellemare S, Wiebe N, Kf R, Tp K, Wr C, et al. Oral versus intravenous rehydration for treating dehydration due to gastroenteritis in children (Review). 2006;

Fedorowicz Z, Jagannath V, Carter B. Antiemetics for reducing vomiting related to acute gastroenteritis in children and adolescents. [Internet]. Cochrane database of systematic reviews. 2011. Available from: https://www.cochranelibrary.com/cdsr/doi/10.1002/14651858.CD005506.pub5/full

NICE. Management of vomiting omiting in children and y young oung people with gastroenteritis : ondansetron. NICE GUIDELINES. 2014. p. 1–20.

Szajewska H, Guarino A, Hojsak I, Indrio F, Kolacek S, Shamir R, et al. Use of Probiotics for Management of Acute Gastroenteritis : A Position Paper by the ESPGHAN Working Group for Probiotics and Prebiotics. 2014;58(4):531–9.

Forrest R, Jones L, Willocks L, Hardie A, Templeton K. Impact of the introduction of rotavirus vaccination on paediatric hospital admissions , Lothian , Scotland : a retrospective observational study. 2017;323–7.

MARLOW RD, MUIR P, VIPOND I, TROTTER CL FA. Assessing the impacts from the first year of rotavirus vaccination in the UK. Arch Dis Child. 2015;100(Supl 3):A30.

Volcano

Managing Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux Disease

Cite this article as:
Sarah Davies. Managing Gastro-Oesophageal Reflux Disease, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2020. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.29563

Isobel is a 10 week old, exclusively breast-fed, baby girl. She is brought into the Emergency Department with a history of frequent vomiting and poor weight gain. Her examination is normal, but when you ask Isobel’s exhausted-looking mother to put her to the breast, she becomes fractious and fussy, pulling away, arching her back, and taking very little feed at all.  

What are you going to do? 

At face value, this familiar presentation sounds like gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD), although the differential for a ten-week old with vomiting and weight loss is wide.

Gastro-oesophageal reflux (GOR) is …the effortless retrograde passage of gastric contents into the oesophagus, with or without overt regurgitation. 

It is:

  • Physiological, due to low tone in the immature lower oesophageal sphincter
  • Common, occurring in up to 50% infants under 6m
  • Frequent – can happen up to x6/day

Gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD) can be diagnosed clinically when GOR is accompanied by troublesome symptoms that affect everyday functioning (eg crying, back-arching, food refusal) and may lead to complications (eg failure to thrive).

Alternative diagnoses should be considered when there are additional red flag features (see below) indicative of a different pathology and under these circumstances, investigations should be tailored to rule these in or out.

*Some red flags overlap with symptoms directly related to GORD. The number, duration and severity of these should inform your decision to investigate on a case by case basis

As Isobel has symptoms of GORD with faltering growth you check her head circumference (which is appropriate), dip a urine (which is negative), and send some bloods for a faltering growth screen (although you strongly suspect they will come back as normal). You explain to Isobel’s mother that there is a stepwise approach to the management of GORD starting with non-pharmacological measures.

So, in the absence of red flag symptoms, do I need to prove its GORD?

In short, no. There is no single gold standard test for the diagnosis of GORD, hence the emphasis on clinical diagnosis. 

Invasive testing does have a place, though it is rarely the job of an ED clinician to be considering this. 

Endoscopy is used under the guidance of a Paediatric Gastroenterologist, for infants who fail to respond to optimal medical management. This will diagnose erosions and eosinophilic oesophagitis. 

pH MII (multi-channel intraluminal impedance) monitoring is used in children whose symptoms persist despite optimal medical therapy with normal endoscopy.   For a great explanation of this technique this previous DFTB post on reflux from 2016

Barium is out. Reliable biomarkers don’t yet exist. Scintigraphy, ultrasound and trial of a proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) are not useful in babies. 

OK, so I only need to investigate if I think there may be another cause for the symptom. But what should be my initial approach to treatment?

  • Positional management?
  • Avoiding overfeeding?
  • Thickening feeds?

Positional management – keeping the baby upright after feeds and elevating the head of the cot to sleep – is often advised for reflux. However, a study by Loots and colleagues in 2014 showed that regurgitation was only reduced through the use of side-lying positions which should NEVER be recommended due to the increased risk of SIDS. Head elevation made no difference at all despite some evidence that it can be beneficial in adults. 

And whilst a common-sense approach would support a move to smaller more frequent feedings and keeping a baby upright for 20-30 minutes after a feed, there isn’t any good quality evidence that confirms this. 

Feed thickeners have been shown repeatedly to reduce the frequency of visible regurgitation episodes in babies with reflux and in some studies to decrease cry/fuss behaviour too. They are safe and come highly recommended as a first-line intervention for babies with troublesome reflux. If you are going to advise a thickener for a breastfed infant, it’s important to suggest a carob bean-based product, such as Carobel, because the amylase in breast milk will digest the rice cereal-based thickeners such as Cerelac.  

Acupuncture, probiotics, massage, hypnotherapy have not yet been adequately studied for us to say one way or another if they are of any benefit. And alginates, probably the most familiar to us being Gaviscon? We’ll cover those shortly.

The key thing to remember for any intervention, is to reserve these for your patients with GORD. Happy, thriving, refluxy babies, typically outgrow their symptoms as they transition to solid food and should be left well alone

OK, but what if my patient has tried these already? What should I advise next? 

First, check how long they have persisted with the intervention. 

One of the biggest reasons for the simpler interventions not to help with GORD is that they are not given enough time to make a difference. Having said that, if a tired parent is repeatedly confronted with a grizzly, uncomfortable baby who is refusing to feed, asking them to persevere for two weeks with an intervention they don’t think is helping, may be practically difficult to achieve. 

In the UK, we have a choice of two key guidelines to help us with the next steps in reflux management.  

  1. NICE, last updated 2019

OR

  1. ESPGHAN/NASPGHAN 2018 joint consensus guidelines which are endorsed and recommended by our own BSPGHAN
  • European Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition
  • North American Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition
  • British Society of Paediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition

Except that these guidelines differ a little on the advice they give for when simple measures don’t help…

NICE recommend a trial of Gaviscon first, and if that doesn’t work 4-8 weeks of a PPI such as omeprazole, and only then suggest a trial of cow’s milk protein exclusion (either through use of a hydrolysed formula or maternal dairy exclusion in breastfed infants) as a last resort, if reflux does not improve after ‘optimal medical management’. 

NASPGHAN/ESPGHAN on the other hand, suggest that ALL infants undergo an initial trial of cow’s milk protein exclusion, and only if this fails do they suggest the use of a PPI or hydrogen receptor antagonist (H2RA) such as Ranitidine. The bottom line is, that no-one has looked at the efficacy of a cow’s milk protein-free diet for symptom relief in babies presenting with reflux as the single symptom of cow’s milk protein intolerance (CMPI).  

The NASPGHAN team argues, that whilst there is no evidence on the topic, there are a number of babies with CMPI manifesting as reflux only who will benefit from this approach. They suggest eliminating cow’s milk protein from an infant’s diet for a minimum of 2 weeks, ideally four. If symptoms resolve and reappear on reintroduction then the diagnosis is clear. 

NASPGHAN then suggest babies who do not respond should be referred to secondary care services and started on a time-limited trial of PPI. 

This is largely so that infants are not left struggling on inadequate therapy for long periods of time, but also because their review found conflicting evidence around the benefit and side effect profile of these medications for young children. 

In six studies looking at PPI versus placebo, four studies showed no difference in regurgitation or other reflux associated symptoms between intervention and control groups. Three studies comparing H2RAs to placebo did show some benefit of the intervention, however, these studies were all in older children with biopsy-proven erosive oesophagitis up to 8 years of age.  Two studies showed endoscopic and histological and clinical features of GORD were reduced with H2RA over placebo, but these were in mixed-age groups including children up to 8 years old.

All studies showed a similar profile of side effects and between drug and placebo arms, however, one study demonstrated an increased rate of infection, in particular lower respiratory tract infection and diarrhoea in the PPI group. 

Given these findings, NASPGHAN cautiously recommends PPI or H2RA therapy in babies who have troublesome reflux despite trying a number of other non-pharmacological management options. 

Their key message is around early referral to secondary care, giving sufficient time for any one intervention to work, and making sure children are appropriately followed up.

So, what should I do? 

Given the somewhat conflicting advice outlined by these two well-respected groups, you could be left feeling unsure how to manage your next case. However, the genuine gap in the evidence market here does mean you are free to exercise your own clinical judgment and tailor your decision making to each individual refluxy baby, whilst empathetically taking on board the thoughts and preferences of the family.  This could, for some babies and parents, be medicine in itself. 

And what about alginates?

Two studies in the large literature review by the NASPGHAN/ESPAGHN group, compare Gavsicon to placebo. They show a reduction in visible regurgitation but no difference in reflux-associated symptoms. Furthermore, infants treated with alginate and then undergoing pH MII for 24 hours, showed no difference in the frequency of regurgitation events between groups. 

Chronic use of alginates causes constipation and poses a theoretical risk of milk-alkali syndrome, which is perhaps why the authors suggest use is limited to short term therapy. NICE do recommend a trial of Gaviscon therapy at an early stage in their pathway, as an alternative to feed thickener, but again on a time-limited basis with a planned review. 

Isobel’s mother had already tried two weeks of feed thickener on recommendation from the GP with no improvement. She was keen to avoid medication if possible so you agreed to a trial of dietary cow’s milk elimination for Mum who would continue to breastfeed and give top-ups with a hydrolysed formula if there was still no weight gain in a week. You gave her a sheet of dietary advice to ensure she maintained her own calcium intake and asked her to see the GP in 2 weeks for a review.  

Take home message

  • The vomiting infant has a wide differential – actively look for red flag features and investigate if you are concerned.
  • Infants with GORD need a management plan; infants with GOR, leave well alone
  • Start simply with an intervention that the family are happy to trial
  • Give time for it to work (up to two weeks)
  • Ensure follow-up for all and onward referral for infants who require acid-suppressive medication 

References

  1. Loots et al. Body positioning and medical therapy for infantile gastroesophageal reflux symptoms. Journal of Pediatric Gastroenterology and Nutrition 2014; 59 (2): 237-243. 
  2. Rosen et al. Pediatric Gastroesophageal Reflux Clinical Practice Guidelines: Joint Recommendations of the North American Society for Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition and the European Society of Pediatric Gastroenterology, Hepatology and Nutrition. JPGN 2018; 66(3): 516-554. 
  3. Winter et al. Efficacy and safety of pantoprazole delayed release granules for oral suspension in a placebo-controlled treatment withdrawal study in infants 1-11 months old with symptomatic GERD. JPGN 2010; 50: 609-618.  
  4. Orenstein et al. Multicenter, double-blind, randomized, placebo-controlled trial assessing the efficacy and safety of proton pump inhibitor lansoprazole in infants with symptoms of gastroesophageal reflux disease. Journal of Pediatrics 2009; 154: 514-520e4. 
  5. Davidson et al. Efficacy and safety of once daily omeprazole for the treatment of gastroesophageal reflux disease in neonatal patients. Journal of Pediatrics 2013; 163: 692-698.e1-2. 
  6. Winter et al. Esomeprazole for the treatment of GERD in infants ages 1-11 months. JPGN 2012; 55: 14-20. 
  7. Hussain et al. Safety and efficacy of delayed release rabeprazole in 1-11 month old infants with symptomatic GERD. JPGN 2014; 58: 226-236. 
  8. Moore et al. Double-blind placebo-controlled trial of omeprazole in irritable infants with gastroesophageal reflux. Journal of Pediatrics 2003; 143: 219-223. 
  9. Cucchiara et al. Cimetidine treatment of reflux oesophagitis in children: an Italian multi-centric study. JPGN 1989; 8: 150-156. 
  10. Orenstein et al. Ranitidine, 75mg, over the counter dose: pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic effects in children with symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux. Alimentary Pharmacology and Therapeutics 2002; 16: 899-907. 
  11. Simeone et al. Treatment of childhood peptic esophagitis: a double-blind placebo-controlled trial of nizatidine. JPGN 1997; 25: 51-55. 
  12. Miller et al. Comparison of the efficacy and safety of a new aluminium free paediatric alginate preparation and placebo in infants with recurrent gastroesophageal reflux. Current Medicines and Research Opinion 1999; 15: 160-168. 
  13.  Ummarino et al. Effect of magnesium alginate plus simethicone on gastro-oesophageal reflux in infants. JPGN 2015; 60: 230-235.
Picture of house

Hospital in the Home

Cite this article as:
Jo Lawrence. Hospital in the Home, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2020. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.28959

Elise is about to have her 8th birthday and has planned a small party at home with her family and two best friends.  Elise also has acute lymphoblastic leukaemia and is in the middle of chemotherapy treatment.  Her next dose of methotrexate is due the day after her birthday but requires pre-hydration the day before….

Thomas is in year 3 and loves playing foursquare at lunch with his friends. He also has CF and requires regular tune-ups of 2 weeks IV antibiotics and physiotherapy…..

MaryKate is an 8 month old and the youngest of 5 children.  She has poor oral feeding due to a complex medical background and requires nasogastric top-ups. Her parents have been told that she could wean from the tube if she participated in an intensive multidisciplinary program but are reluctant to attend hospital due to the significant disruption on family routine…..  

Is there a way Elise could enjoy her birthday at home, Thomas stay active at school and MaryKate receive the treatment she needs without significant family disruption?

What is Hospital in the Home?

Hospital in the Home (HITH) refers to hospital level care provided in the home environment. 

As we look at managing our growing population with a fixed number of hospital beds this is one area of healthcare that is set to boom!  

When admitted to HITH, clinicians visit the home and provide the acute care interventions required in 1-2 visits per day.  The advantages of this model of care on hospital flow and access are readily apparent.  Less obvious, although equally critical, are the substantial benefits for the family and patient.  Being treated in a safe place surrounded by familiar faces eases the stress and anxiety experienced by the child. Cost-savings for families obviously include not having to fork out for travel and hospital parking, but the real cost-savings occur for families because both parents no longer have to take carers leave – one for the hospitalized child, the other for the siblings. On average, HITH ends up being one-third of the cost of hospitalization for families1. In addition, HITH avoids disruption to family routines and unwanted separation.

So what can Hospital in the Home do?

Pretty much anything!  As long as the patient is clinically stable (not heading for ICU) and can have their care needs delivered in up to 2 visits per day, then it can be done.  

Traditionally Hospital in the Home models have centred around IV antibiotics and little else, but that has dramatically changed over the past few years. 

Here are some of the common things that paediatric HITHs are currently doing2:

  • Diabetes education
  • Eczema dressings
  • Subcutaneous infusions
  • Chemotherapy
  • Pre and post-hydration for chemotherapy
  • TPN hook ons and hook offs
  • Wound dressings
  • NG feed support
  • Cardiac monitoring
  • CF tunes ups
  • Physiotherapy 
  • IV antibiotics 

Baseline criteria regarding distance from hospital and safety of home environment exist but solutions exist for almost situations.

Although most centres service a certain distance from hospital, care can often be outsourced for children who live more rurally.  The care continues to be managed by the tertiary hospital but provided by local care teams – a superb option.

In cases where a barrier exists for staff to enter the home, creative solutions can be found by meeting children at school, in parks or family member’s homes.  

What has changed with Covid-19?

Whilst paediatric hospitals in general saw a fall in patient presentations, HITH referrals have sky-rocketed.  Doctors and families have experienced renewed interest in moving vulnerable patients out of hospital walls and away from the potential of cross-infection.  Stricter visitor restrictions meant hospitalisation had an even greater impact on family life and the driver to manage care at home wherever possible has grown.

Most of this growth has been through increasing the proportion of eligible children referred rather than creating new pathways.  A couple of children have been admitted for observation of Covid-19 infection, but these cases have been few and far between.

However, as with every area of healthcare delivery, the biggest changes for HITH have been moving with the technology.  Education visits, medical and nursing reviews and physiotherapy have all been converted to telehealth where safe to do so.

Vaccination for influenza was offered to all patients admitted to HITH and was accepted by 70% of eligible patients.  65% of these were being vaccinated for the first time against flu3.  In an environment where routine vaccinations have been falling4, this is a powerful demonstration of the opportunities that exist within HITH.

Infants with bronchiolitis have been managed through HITH before5 but the care pathway has never stuck due to barriers accessing cylinders on the same day and clinician confidence.  A new model has been rolled out overcoming these barriers through utilising oxygen concentrators and remote monitoring.

With time, our use of remote monitoring and ability to feed vital signs directly into the Electronic Medical Record, will allow massive expansion of HITH services.   Predictive modelling from large EMR datasets will allow more accurate prediction of which children are likely to be safely transferred to the home environment.  Realtime data and predictive modelling will enhance clinician and family confidence and enable us to fully realise the benefits of HITH to hospitals and families.  

So what about our friends Elise, Thomas and MaryKate….

Elise is able to receive her pre-hydration at home on her birthday.  She celebrates her birthday in her parent’s bed with her sister beside her, both building her new lego sets.  Her best friends visit and her mother prepares a special meal and bakes a special cake.  She is able to go to bed that night, knowing the HITH nurses will visit every day over the following week to administer her chemotherapy and post-hydration and she has avoided another week in hospital.

The HITH nurses visit Thomas daily before school to connect his longline to a Baxter antibiotic infusion. Before and after school he performs physiotherapy via telehealth.  At school, he wears his antibiotic in a backpack and can continue to play 4 square at lunch.

MaryKate is visited by the HITH dietitian and speech therapy who provide feeding advice and a regime that fits around the family routine. They can see where MaryKate sits for meals and how her meals are prepared first hand and are able to offer some helpful suggestions. The team are also able to visit MaryKate at her daycare and ensure her routine is consistent. In between visits, MaryKate is reviewed via telehealth by the allied health team.  She makes significant oral progress and by the end of 2 weeks, her tube is no longer required.

Prehospital analgesia: part 2

Cite this article as:
Joe Mooney + Dani Hall. Prehospital analgesia: part 2, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2020. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.27501

You’re in the rapid response vehicle, having just handed over a 2 year old with a femoral fracture. As you clear the hospital, a call comes in: 8 year old, fall from slide, deformed left arm, conscious and breathing. When you arrive in the house you find him lying on the sofa, with bruising and deformity of his left elbow. The paracetamol and ibuprofen given by his mother has not controlled his pain*, so you take out a methoxyflurane inhaler and explain to him to suck in and blow out through ‘the whistle’. After a few breaths he begins to relax.

Methoxyflurane is a fluorinated hydrocarbon, used as an inhaled anaesthetic in the ’60s and early ’70s, until it fell out of favour after case reports describing renal failure at anaesthetic doses. But, when given in small doses, methoxyflurane has excellent analgesic properties, with no nephrotoxic side effects. It has been used extensively in Australia and New Zealand by prehospital clinicians as a self-administered analgesic for short-term pain relief in adults and children. After being licenced in 2015 in the UK and Ireland for the emergency relief of moderate to severe pain in conscious adults with trauma, methoxyflurane was included in the Irish prehospital CPG for EMTs, paramedics and advanced paramedics with permission under the seventh amendment to allow its use in children.

Added as a liquid to a Penthrox® inhaler, methoxyflurane vaporises, to be inhaled on demand. It has revolutionised prehospital pain control due to its quick onset and easy, pain free administration and, because of its light weight, crews can carry it over rough ground easily. Known as ‘the green whistle‘, each 3ml dose is quoted to last between 20 and 30 minutes, but in practice can sometimes last up to 45 minutes or an hour, depending on a child’s respiratory rate and depth and the way in which they self-administer. The Irish prehospital CPGs allow two inhalers to be administered in 24 hours to a patient, so when there’s an extended journey time, methoxyflurane inhalers used back-to-back can provide up to two hours of analgesia, which can be supplemented by the simple analgesics, paracetamol and ibuprofen, or morphine, fentanyl and ketamine, as needed.

But what’s the evidence for methoxyflurane in children?

Pop methoxyflurane in the PubMed search bar, and a lot comes up. It’s safe, it works, but there are surprisingly few randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that include children. A couple of observational studies are noteworthy. An Australian study in the prehospital setting, published in 2006 by Franz Babl and colleagues, describes an observational case series of 105 children, ranging in age from 15 months to 17 years, who received methoxyflurane while by being conveyed to hospital by ambulance. The children’s pain scores dropped from 7.9 to 4.5, with few side effects, although there was a tendency towards deep sedation in the under 5s. The following year Babl’s team published an ED-based observational case series of 14 children aged 6 to 13 years with extremity injuries who received methoxyflurane for painful procedures in the hospital setting. Although methoxyflurane was a useful analgesic agent, Babl’s team found it did not work as well as a procedural analgesic for fracture reduction.

The first double-blind RCT of methoxyflurane in children was published almost two decades ago by Chin et al in 2002. Forty-one children over the age of 5 with upper limb fractures were randomised to receive either methoxyflurane or placebo. Unsurprisingly, methoxyflurane resulted in a lower pain score at 10 minutes than placebo. Adverse events weren’t reported, but the apparent safety and efficacy of methoxyflurane demonstrated in this study paved the way the some bigger and better RCTs.

A better known, and more recent, RCT involving children was the STOP! trial, published in the EMJ in 2014. This randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled trial was conducted at six EDs in the UK. Three hundred patients, 90 between the ages of 12 and 17, with minor trauma (such as burns, fractures, dislocations and lacerations), were randomised to receive either methoxyflurane or saline via an inhaler. In a nifty way to keep the patients, doctors and nurses blinded to which drug was being administered, a drop of methoxyflurane was added to the outside of every inhaler so both drug devices smelled the same. Pain scores dropped significantly lower in the methoxyflurane group, with a median onset of action of 4 minutes. But what about those adolescents? Although 45 12 to 17 year olds were included in each group, their data wasn’t analysed separately, and children under the age of 12 were excluded from the study, so although we can probably assume methoxyflurane works well and is safe in adolescents, more trials would be helpful.

Segue to the Magpie trial, which is currently recruiting in the UK and Ireland via the PERUKI network. This international multi-centre randomised, double-blind placebo-controlled trial is specifically investigating the efficacy and safety of methoxyflurane in children and young people so that its UK license can be extended to include children. Like STOP!, participants are being randomised to either methoxyflurane or placebo (again saline) via an inhaler. To ensure younger children are well represented in the study data, the study team are aiming to recruit higher numbers of 6 to 11 year olds than adolescents, with a recruitment target of 220 children and adolescents in total. We’re awaiting the results eagerly…


*A top tip on top up dosing

This child had been given 500mg of paracetamol and 280mg of ibuprofen by his mother before the crew arrived. He was 8 years old, with an estimated weight of 31kg. Based on Irish CPGs allowing a paracetamol dose of 20mg/kg (620mg) and ibuprofen dose of 10mg/kg (310mg) he was underdosed. It’s important to top-up simple analgesics as part of your approach to pain relief in children.


But what happened to the 8 year old?

You check CSMs (circulation, sensation and movement) before and after applying a splint and transfer him to the ambulance on a stretcher. His pain is very well controlled, and he asks his mother to take a photo for his friends. This sentence is hard for him to say and he gets the giggles. You transfer him uneventfully to hospital where he’s diagnosed with a supracondylar fracture.

Read more about assessing pain, prehospital analgesia in children and the evidence behind intranasal fentanyl in part 1 of the DFTB prehospital analgesia series.

References

Hartshorn, S., & Middleton, P. M. (2019). Efficacy and safety of inhaled low-dose methoxyflurane for acute paediatric pain: A systematic review. Trauma21(2), 94–102. https://doi.org/10.1177/1460408618798391

Babl FE, Jamison SR, Spicer M, Bernard S. Inhaled methoxyflurane as a prehospital analgesic in children. Emerg Med Australas. 2006;18(4):404-410. doi:10.1111/j.1742-6723.2006.00874.x

Babl FE, Barnett P, Palmer G, Oakley E and Davidson A. A pilot study of inhaled methoxyflurane for procedural analgesia in children. Pediatric Anesthesia. 2007;17:148-153. doi:10.1111/j.1460-9592.2006.02037.x

Chin, R, McCaskill, M, Browne, G A randomized controlled trial of inhaled methoxyflurance pain relief in children with upper limb fracture. J Paediatr Child Health 2002; 38: A13–A13.

Coffey F, Wright J, Hartshorn S, et al. STOP!: a randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled study of the efficacy and safety of methoxyflurane for the treatment of acute pain. EMJ 2014;31:613-618

Hartshorn, S., Barrett, M.J., Lyttle, M.D. et al. Inhaled methoxyflurane (Penthrox®) versus placebo for injury-associated analgesia in children—the MAGPIE trial (MEOF-002): study protocol for a randomised controlled trial. Trials 20, 393 (2019). https://doi.org/10.1186/s13063-019-3511-4

It’s Only Wheeze – Treatment Is Simple, Isn’t It?: Meredith Borland at DFTB19

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. It’s Only Wheeze – Treatment Is Simple, Isn’t It?: Meredith Borland at DFTB19, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2020. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.20828

Meredith Borland is a paediatric emergency physician and the Director of Emergency Medicine at Perth Children’s Hospital in Perth, Western Australia. She was a founding member of the PREDICT Executive and is the current chair of PREDICT.

Last year at DFTB18, Meredith continued an ongoing discussion about the use of steroids in wheeze. This year, she took us on a journey through an emergency department visit for a number of children who may or may not receive various interventions. This was a fun, interactive and thought-provoking talk that highlighted some common differences in practice.

#doodlemed on this talk by @char_durand below

This talk was recorded live at DFTB19 in London, England. With the theme of  “The Journey” we wanted to consider the journeys our patients and their families go on, both metaphorical and literal.

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

Atomoxetine

Cite this article as:
Mary Hardimon. Atomoxetine, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2020. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.25536

James is a 7-year-old boy who was diagnosed with ADHD 2 years ago and was started on short-acting Ritalin 10mg in the morning and 10mg at lunch. Since you saw him 6 months ago, you notice that he has lost 3kg. This is in addition to the 2kg he lost when first starting stimulant medication. His mother has been supplementing his diet with high energy foods such as avocado, butter and nut but she is concerned about his weight loss despite these efforts and would like to discuss other medication options (as he has had a good effect reported by school with treatment). You have heard great things about atomoxetine (Strattera) but aren’t comfortable using it yet…

 

How does it work?

Strattera is thought to be a selective noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor (SNRI).

 

Indications for usage

Atomoxetine is indicated for ADHD (diagnosed according to DSM-V criteria) with any of the following:

  • Contraindication to dexamfetamine, methylphenidate or lisdexamfetamine as specified in TGA-approved product information
  • Co-morbid mood disorder that has developed or worsened as a result of dexamfetamine, methylphenidate or lisdexamfetamine treatment and is of a severity necessitating treatment withdrawal
  • Unacceptable medical risk of a severity necessitating permanent stimulant treatment withdrawal if given a stimulant treatment with another agent
  • Experienced adverse reactions of a severity necessitating permanent treatment withdrawal following treatment with dexamfetamine, methylphenidate, and lisdexamfetamine (not simultaneously)

 

TGA contraindications

  • Symptomatic cardiovascular disease – moderate/severe hypertension, atrial fibrillation/flutter, ventricular tachycardia, ventricular fibrillation, advanced atherosclerosis
  • Severe cardiovascular disorders – those whose condition would be expected to deteriorate if they experienced increases in blood pressure or in heart rate (for example, 15 to 20 mmHg in blood pressure or 20 beats per minute in heart rate)
  • Uncontrolled hyperthyroidism
  • Phaeochromocytoma – active or history of
  • MAO inhibitors
  • Narrow-angle glaucoma

 

Dosage and Administration

Initiated at 0.5mg/kg and increased after a minimum of 3 days to a target total daily dose of approximately 1.2mg/kg (may be given as a single daily dose or as evenly divided doses twice daily)

 

Adverse effects

Most common (>10%):

  • Headache
  • Insomnia or drowsiness
  • Hyperhidrosis
  • Xerostomia
  • Nausea/vomiting
  • Anorexia
  • Abdominal pain
  • Constipation

 

WARNING – There is an increased risk of suicidal ideation in children and adolescents

 

Connecting Advanced Care Practitioners

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Connecting Advanced Care Practitioners, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2020. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.26520

Our last ACP teaching session was on Thursday 8th October 2020. It covered case-based discussion, head injuries that may not be head injuries, and neonatal emergencies. See the recording below.

Our ACP webinar series is an opportunity for Advanced Practitioners who see children to connect with each other and to share knowledge.The webinars are delivered by and aimed at ACPs from any background who would like to share and improve their knowledge about caring for children in acute settings. The sessions are free, and anyone is welcome to join. Each session will comprise three short talks followed by a panel discussion and time for questions. We will be covering clinical and non-clinical topics, from a range of presenters. We will hear from some experienced speakers, as well as giving less seasoned speakers the opportunity to have their voice heard. If you have an idea for a topic you’d like to present, or if there’s something you have a burning desire to find out more about, please get in touch.

October 2020 – case-based discussion, head injuries that may not be head injuries, and neonatal emergencies

July 2020 – antibiotics, lymph nodes, and team leading

Performing the newborn check

Cite this article as:
Taryn Miller. Performing the newborn check, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2020. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.25986

There are two situations in which you would examine a newborn:

  • As part of the newborn screening examination as a “baby check”
  • In the emergency department

Both situations are slightly different, but the same structured approach can be applied

 

Before you begin…gather what you might need

  • Examine the baby in a warm, well-lit environment- get a blanket if needs be, or examine in the neonatal resuscitaire if available
  • Preferably with parent/ guardian present (if newborn screening exam, if not call parent)
  • Tongue depressor
  • Ophthalmoscope that works!
  • Stethoscope – In NICU/SCBU usually each baby will have their own special stethoscope. If you are using your own, make sure to give it a good wipe before and after use
  • Measuring tape for head circumference and a set of weighing scales to examine the baby without the nappy!

 

  • Keep the baby warm by wrapping them in a blanket or rocking the baby
  • Auscultate the lungs and heart in mum’s arms or when the baby is settled
  • If a newborn is unsettled or crying, consider whether the examination needs to be done at that exact moment. Perhaps suggest that the baby has a feed or a cuddle with mum or dad.

 

Before you begin

  1. Introduce yourself with “Hello, my name is…
  2. Check the name and DOB on the name band
  3. Explain to parent/guardian why it is important and what the examination will involve
  4. Gain consent
  5. Wash your hands and don gloves!

PS – don’t forget to congratulate mum, it is a really nice touch and makes the parent or guardian feel at ease.

 

 

Before the baby cries – Perform these things first!

Assessment of breathing (0:17) – Respiratory rate, look for respiratory distress – intercostal and subcostal recession, tracheal tugging, nasal flaring

Assessment of circulation (0:36) – Auscultate the heart rate (all four areas), auscultate the lungs, feel the femoral pulses on both sides

Abdomen (0:48)- Palpate the abdomen for organomegaly, specifically the liver and the spleen. And look for any hernias

 

Structured assessment – Top to toe (1:14)

Head (1:14)

General inspection – Look for facial asymmetry and dysmorphic features.
Fontanelle –Palpate the anterior and posterior fontanelles
Ears- Look for skin tags or pits
Mouth – Assess the hard and soft palate. Ideally, you should use a tongue depressor and look directly with a light. Use a gloved finger in the mouth to look at the sucking reflex

*Chest and abdomen as before*

Extremities (1:50)

Hands – count the fingers, and look at the creases, assess the grasp reflex
Feet – count the toes, and look at the grasp reflex
Genitalia – Check for hypospadias and feel both testes
Bottom – make sure the anus is patent

STOP – warn parents- what you are going to do and not “I’m going to drop your baby”!!

Reflexes (2:24)

Head lag (2:30)
Moro reflex (2:42)
Stepping reflex (2:45)
Tone and ventral suspension (2:49)

Spine (2:30) – Look at the sacrum for birthmarks, hairy patches, or for any sacral dimples 

Hips (3:04) – Perform Barlow’s and Ortolani’s test to assess for developmental dysplasia of the hip

 

And finally

Pre-and post-ductal saturations (3:12)  – right hand for pre-ductal saturations and post-ductal saturations can be either foot

Eyes – Check for the red reflex

TOP TIP! Wrap the baby in a blanket and sit them upwards, the baby should open their eyes and let you get a good look with the ophthalmoscope.

Look at the baby book and plot previous weight measurements and today’s weight on an age-specific growth chart along with the head circumference

 

This video was created by Bec Packton, Aarani Somaskanthan, Alice Munro, and Izolda Biro with special thanks to Lisa Crouch and baby James. Check out our YouTube channel for more great teaching.

Selected references

American Academy of Pediatrics. Ear Pits, Skin Tags, and Hearing Loss. AAP Grand Rounds. 2009 Jan 1;21(1):2-.DOI: 10.1542/gr.21-1-2

Assessing for a patent anus in a neonate – Turowski, C., Dingemann, J. & Gillick, J. Delayed diagnosis of imperforate anus: an unacceptable morbidity. Pediatr Surg Int 26, 1083–1086 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1007/s00383-010-2691-5

Pre and post ductal saturations – Rüegger, C., Bucher, H.U. & Mieth, R.A. Pulse oximetry in the newborn: Is the left hand pre- or post-ductal?. BMC Pediatr 10, 35 (2010). https://doi.org/10.1186/1471-2431-10-35

Plotting growth chart UK – https://www.rcpch.ac.uk/resources/uk-who-growth-charts-guidance-health-professionals & Plotting growth charts Australia https://www.rch.org.au/childgrowth/Growth_Charts/

Immunisations –  DFTB – Immunisation Quick reference

 

Bibliography and some other approaches

Queensland Maternity and Neonatal Clinical Guidelines Program – Neonatal Examination

Davies, Cartwright & Inglis, Pocket Notes on Neonatology, 2nd Ed. 2008. Elsevier: Australia

Examination Adapted from; Examination of the Newborn: A Practical Guide. Helen Baston, Heather Durward Pg 3

Oral or IV antibiotics?

Cite this article as:
Alison Boast. Oral or IV antibiotics?, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2020. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.24974

There are many self-perpetuating myths when it comes to antibiotic use in children. A few that seem intuitive, and come up almost daily, include the idea that intravenous antibiotics are ‘better’, that children require lower doses than adults, and ‘longer is better’ when it comes to treatment duration.

A few key concepts can be helpful to understand why certain routes and doses of antibiotics are required:

  • Pharmacokinetics: the effect of the body on the drug – how the body absorbs, distributes, metabolizes and excretes the antibiotic
  • Pharmacodynamics: the effect of the drug on the body – how the antibiotic effects bacteria in the body 
  • Bioavailability: the amount of the antibiotic which is effectively absorbed when given orally and reaches the bloodstream

Here are some points to consider next time you need to chart antibiotics for a child.

 

When are intravenous antibiotics absolutely required?

  1. Speed – if there is a life (think sepsis, meningitis) or limb-threatening (eg. necrotising fasciitis) intravenous antibiotics are required as they reach peak plasma levels in seconds/minutes, rather than hours
  2. Absorption – for children with poor or unreliable oral absorption (eg. inflammatory bowel disease, short gut) intravenous antibiotics will likely be required
  3. Neonates – in general neonates are considered to have poor oral absorption, therefore antibiotics are usually given intravenously
  4. No oral options – in some cases there may be no oral option available; this is particularly relevant for highly resistant organisms such as extended-spectrum beta-lactamase producing organisms
  5. High dose – if a very high dose of an antibiotic is required the volume of liquid required for a child to consume may be excessive, in these cases intravenous antibiotics may be required
  6. Nil per os – in children who are not able to take any oral medications (eg. bowel obstruction) intravenous antibiotics may be required; remember insertion of a nasogastric tube and NG medications may be an option particularly for younger children
  7. Worsening infection on oral antibiotics – this one can be a little tricky as factors such as wrong dose (antibiotics are commonly under-dosed in the community), wrong antibiotic, and poor compliance need to be considered, but sometimes children may require admission for intravenous antibiotics

 

When can you change to oral antibiotics?

There are four general principles guiding the change from intravenous to oral antibiotics (McMullen et al.)

  • Clinical condition – note that fever alone does not need to prevent switch
  • Ability to absorb oral antibiotics
  • Availability of an appropriate oral antibiotic
  • Practical issues

The above reference gives a thorough discussion on the evidence of when to switch to oral antibiotics for a range of common paediatric infections (skin and soft tissue, urinary tract infections etc).

 

What are other factors need to be taken into account?

Bioavailability – some drugs have excellent oral absorption, therefore there it is almost criminal to give them IV if the child can swallow them! Think metronidazole, rifampicin, doxycycline, ciprofloxacin and clindamycin (which all have good tissue penetration)

“Help – my child refuses to take oral antibiotics!” – this is a tricky one and the use of an experienced paediatric pharmacist is invaluable as there are many aids that can be used to help resilient toddlers take their medications

 

Why is this important?

The implications of shortening the course of intravenous antibiotics and antibiotics overall are numerous…

  • Shorter courses of antibiotics may affect antimicrobial resistance
  • Shorter inpatient stays (required unless outpatient antimicrobial therapy available through a hospital in the home service) associated with improved quality of life in children and their families, and money-saving for the hospital system
  • Intravenous antibiotics may be associated with line complications, pain and traumatic experiences for children

 

Selected references

McMullan BJ, Andresen D, Blyth CC, Avent ML, Bowen AC, Britton PN, Clark JE, Cooper CM, Curtis N, Goeman E, Hazelton B. Antibiotic duration and timing of the switch from intravenous to oral route for bacterial infections in children: systematic review and guidelines. The Lancet Infectious Diseases. 2016 Aug 1;16(8):e139-52.

Different halves of the same page: Gayle Hann and Amani Simpson at DFTB19

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Different halves of the same page: Gayle Hann and Amani Simpson at DFTB19, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2020. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.22374

Gayle Hann is a paediatrician that hit the headlines for her tireless work in helping the sufferers of gang violence. She has made it her mission to engage and involve youth gang members in their own care and rehabilitation in an effort to prevent them needing to come to the hospital in the future.

Amani Simpson is now an entrepreneur and founder of Aviard Inspires but at the age of 21, he was stabbed seven times in the course of a robbery. Since then he has dedicated his life to transform the lives (and perceptions of) youths across the country.

Never have such an unlikely couple come together to make a difference. This talk, from #DFTB19, had laughs, tears, and fist-bumps aplenty. It is the feel-good story of the conference that will reaffirm the idea that people are not all bad.

 

©Ian Summers

 

 
DoodleMedicine sketch by @char_durand 
 

 

 

This talk was recorded live at DFTB19 in London, England. With the theme of  “The Journey” we wanted to consider the journeys our patients and their families go on, both metaphorical and literal. DFTB20 will be held in Brisbane, Australia.

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

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Guillain-Barre Syndrome

Cite this article as:
Aoife Fox. Guillain-Barre Syndrome, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2020. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.25051

A 2-year-old girl, Amy, attends the emergency department. Her father says that for the last 24 hours she has been refusing to walk. Prior to this, she was running amuck without difficulty. In the ED, you notice that she is now having difficulty crawling. She has no significant medical history but did have fever along with a runny nose and cough 2 weeks prior to her attendance which her parents managed with paracetamol at home.

 

What is Guillain-Barré Syndrome?

Guillain-Barré Syndrome (GBS) is a group of acute immune-mediated polyneuropathies.  It most commonly presents as an acute monophasic, paralyzing illness provoked by a preceding infection.

It is the most common cause of acute flaccid paralysis in children. The annual incidence is 0.34 to 1.34 cases per 100,000 in under the 18s, which makes it less common in children than in adults. It rarely occurs in children younger than 2 years, but when it does affect younger children because GBS is way off our radars, this can make it really tricky to diagnose. Boys are affected more often than girls.

 

What causes it?

It’s thought that an immune response cross-reacts with the myelin or axon of peripheral nerves due to molecular mimicry. Similar peptide sequences between the body’s own peptides and foreign peptides sometimes cause the immune system to get confused and attack its own tissues.  You probably knew that myasthenia gravis is due to auto-antibodies against the acetylcholine receptor but did you know that the receptor shares a 7 amino acid sequence with HSV, the herpes simplex virus? It’s thought that exposure to HSV may be the precipitant for myasthenia gravis.

Approximate 2/3 of patients give a history of an antecedent respiratory tract or GI infection. Campylobacter infection is the most commonly identified precipitant and can be demonstrated in as many as 30% of cases. Other infectious precipitants include CMV, EBV, Mycoplasma pneumoniae, and influenza-like illnesses.

Other suggested triggers include immunization, although there is no clear causal relationship several cases suggest an association, as well as one with trauma and surgery.

What about Guillain Barre and COVID?

There have been several case studies reporting GBS associated with SARS-CoV-2 during the COVID-19 pandemic. Given the small number of cases, it is unclear whether severe neurological deficits are typical features of COVID-19 associated GBS. An answer to the diagnostic conundrum of whether the respiratory compromise in COVID19-associated-GBS is due to coronavirus or muscle weakness is yet to be answered.

 

How can I recognize it?

GBS classically begins with paraesthesia in the extremities – fingers and toes –  followed by lower extremity symmetric, or modestly asymmetric, weakness that ascends up the body. In severe cases, the muscles of respiration are affected, in about 10-20% of children.

Cranial neuropathy can also occur, most commonly affecting facial nerves, causing bilateral facial weakness.

Autonomic dysfunction occurs in approximately half of children with GBS: cardiac dysrhythmias, orthostatic hypotension, hypertension, paralytic ileus, bladder dysfunction, sweating.

Physical exam typically reveals:

  • Symmetric weakness
  • Diminished or absent reflexes
  • Gait abnormalities
  • Sensory symptoms include pain, paraesthesia (reflecting nerve irritability)

Generally, children have shorter clinical courses and more complete recoveries in comparison to adults. A child’s function typically deteriorates for 2-4 weeks followed by a slow return of function over the coming weeks to months.

 

On examination, you find a quiet child who is otherwise acting appropriately. She is afebrile and the rest of her vitals are within normal limits. No bruises or rashes are observed on her skin and there is no evidence of trauma. Cardiovascular, respiratory, abdominal and ENT exams are unremarkable. Her extremities are warm and well perfused with normal pulses. There is no bony tenderness or deformities on palpation of her limbs. On neurological examination, she is moving all 4 limbs spontaneously. However, she will not bear weight or stand. Both her lower limbs are weak on exam. Her grip strength is reduced and when given a toy, it falls. Both upper and lower extremity reflexes are absent.

 

Subtypes

GBS most commonly presents in the classical way above: a mixed motor and sensory polyneuropathy with lower limb pain and ascending weakness. This is the classic Acute Inflammatory Demyelinating  Polyradiculopathy (AIDP), which accounts for 85 to 90% of cases in the developed world. But, there are a few other subtypes of GBS you should be aware of.

Acute Motor Axonal Neuropathy (AMAN), is a purely motor from of GBS, occurring mainly in Asia, Central and South America and associated with a preceding Campylobacter infection. Its clinical features are similar to AIDP, but respiratory failure is more common.

Acute Motor-Sensory Axonal Neuropathy (AMSAN) is similar to AMAN but with more sensory symptoms. The course tends to be prolonged and severe but is pretty uncommon in children.

Miller-Fisher syndrome is characterized by an external ophthalmoplegia, ataxia and muscle weakness with areflexia. It affects adults more commonly than children but should definitely be on your radar in a child presenting with cranial nerve and lower limb neurology.

 

How can it be diagnosed?

The initial diagnosis of GBS is based on the history and clinical exam – be suspicious of a child with lower limb weakness, weak reflexes and a preceding illness. Use investigations to confirm your suspicion.

CSF

CSF protein above 45mg/dL with a normal WCC count is present in 50-66% of patients in the first week after symptoms onset and ≥75% of patients in the third week. This disconnect between protein and white cells is called albuminocytologic dissociation.

Gadolinium-enhanced MRI of Spine

MRI will show contrast enhancement of the spinal nerve roots, cauda equina or cranial nerve roots. These changes aren’t specific to the GBS, but can be helpful in the correct clinical setting.

Nerve conduction studies

This is the most specific and sensitive test available for GBS, abnormal in up to 90% of cases. The test can be technically difficult in small children.

Antibodies

Antibodies against GQ1b (the ganglioside component of a nerve) are present in the vast majority of patients with Miller-Fisher syndrome.

 

In the emergency department, you send baseline bloods (FBC, U&E, LFTs and CRP) which are all normal and organize a CT head under sedation which is unremarkable. After getting consent from her parents you perform a lumbar puncture. The CSF appears clear. It has no red blood cells, 2 white blood cells and CSF glucose is within the normal limits but her protein is mildly elevated. No organisms were seen on gram stain and cultures had no growth after 5-days. You refer her to the neurology team for further investigation.

 

What else could it be?

The differential diagnosis of GBS is long.

 

Brain

  • Bilateral strokes
  • Acute disseminated encephalomyelitis
  • Acute cerebellar ataxia syndrome
  • Psychogenic symptoms

Spine

  • Anterior spinal artery syndrome
  • Compressive myelopathy
  • Transverse myelitis
  • Poliomyelitis
  • Infectious causes of acute myelitis

Peripheral nervous system

  • Chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy
  • Critical illness polyneuropathy
  • Infection-related radiculitis (e.g. HIV, CMV, Lyme disease)
  • Thiamine deficiency
  • Toxins: biologic toxins (diphtheria), heavy metals (arsenic)
  • Vasculitis
  • Metabolic and electrolyte disorders (e.g. hypoglycaemia, hypophosphatemia)

Neuromuscular junction

  • Botulism
  • Myasthenia gravis
  • Neuromuscular blocking agents

Muscle

  • Acute inflammatory myopathies (e.g. dermatomyositis, polymyositis)
  • Acute viral myositis
  • Acute rhabdomyolysis
  • Critical illness myopathy
  • Metabolic myopathies (e.g. hypokalaemia, hyperkalaemia)
  • Mitochondrial myopathies

 

What is the treatment?

The mainstay of treatment is supportive management including close monitoring of motor, autonomic and respiratory function as well as pain management and prevention of immobility complications, such as pressure ulcers. ICU admission for mechanical ventilation will be required in 10-20% of kids. This is more likely to be needed in children with:

  • rapidly increasing weakness,
  • bulbar dysfunction,
  • bilateral facial weakness or

In addition IV immunoglobulin (IVIG) and plasmapheresis (plasma exchange) can be used in children with severe, progressive GBS (i.e. worsening respiratory status or need for mechanical ventilation, rapidly progressing weakness, inability to walk unaided or significant bulbar weakness).

IVIG  is typically preferred to plasmapheresis in children due to its better safety record and ease of administration

Plasmapheresis can be useful in bigger children where technically it is more feasible to perform. However, there are no reliable studies to suggest one has better efficacy than the other in children.

 

During her admission, Amy has a Gadolinium-enhanced MRI of the spine and nerve conduction studies which are consistent with the acute inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculopathy (ADIP) subtype of GBS. She is given IVIG. She does not develop any respiratory complications. On discharge after three weeks, her weakness is greatly improved and completely resolves over the next two months.

 

Bottom line

  • Clinical examination is key – do not forget to examine reflexes!
  • Always ask about recent viral illnesses.
  • GBS is the most common cause of acute flaccid paralysis in children and 10-20% will require mechanical ventilation.

 

Selected references

Bloch SA, Akhavan M, Avarello J. Weakness and the Inability to Ambulate in a 14-Month-Old Female: A Case Report and Concise Review of Guillain-Barre Syndrome. Case Rep Emerg Med [Internet]. 2013 [cited 2020 Apr 11];2013. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3572648/

 Yuki N, Hartung H-P. Guillain–Barré Syndrome. New England Journal of Medicine [Internet]. 2012 Jun 14 [cited 2020 Apr 5];366(24):2294–304. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1056/NEJMra1114525

Rudant J, Dupont A, Mikaeloff Y, Bolgert F, Coste J, Weill A. Surgery and risk of Guillain-Barré syndrome: A French nationwide epidemiologic study. Neurology. 2018 25;91(13):e1220–7.

Hicks CW, Kay B, Worley SE, Moodley M. A clinical picture of Guillain-Barré syndrome in children in the United States. J Child Neurol. 2010 Dec;25(12):1504–10.

Dimachkie MM, Barohn RJ. Guillain-Barré Syndrome and Variants. Neurol Clin [Internet]. 2013 May [cited 2020 Apr 5];31(2):491–510. Available from: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3939842/

Willison HJ, Jacobs BC, van Doorn PA. Guillain-Barré syndrome. The Lancet [Internet]. 2016 Aug 13 [cited 2020 Apr 5];388(10045):717–27. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0140673616003391

Ryan MM. Pediatric Guillain-Barré syndrome. Curr Opin Pediatr. 2013 Dec;25(6):689–93.

Hughes RAC, Wijdicks EFM, Barohn R, Benson E, Cornblath DR, Hahn AF, et al. Practice parameter: Immunotherapy for Guillain–Barré syndrome. Neurology. 2003 Sep 23;61(6):736.