Toddler fracture

Cite this article as:
Rhiannon McClaren. Toddler fracture, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2021. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.31170

A 2-year-old girl, Aila, presents to the emergency department with her mother. She had been running around at childcare playing with her friends when she fell over. She is upset, has refused to walk since and won’t weight bear on her right leg. On examination, there is no obvious swelling or deformity and on palpation and axial loading it appears that her pain is most likely localised to her right lower leg, but it’s hard to be sure.

A toddler’s fracture is a non-displaced spiral fracture of the distal two-thirds of the tibial shaft, with an intact fibula, occurring in children generally between the ages of 9 months and 3 years. The periosteum remains intact. It was first described in 1964 by Dunbar et al. It is thought to be due to new stresses on the bone due to increasing ambulation.

History and examination

The mechanism is usually trivial, a trip or a fall, and often involves a twisting mechanism. Sometimes a specific story of trauma is difficult to elicit. More commonly children present unwilling to bear weight or limping with non-specific examination findings. They may be tender to palpation of the tibia, have pain with dorsiflexion of the ankle or pain with gentle twisting of the lower leg. All joints of the lower limb should be examined. It is always worth examining both lower limbs as gait can be difficult to assess in toddlers and may be misleading regarding the side of the injury.

As part of a thorough history and examination, any history of fever, weight loss, recent illness, or recurrent presentations with minor injuries should be elicited. The child should have their spine and neurology examined as well as any bruising, petechiae, warmth and swelling of joints, and puncture wounds on the soles of the feet documented.

Imaging

Initial x-rays may show a non-displaced spiral fracture of the tibia, however, a fracture may not be seen despite multiple views. AP and lateral views should be adequate in children, however, an oblique view may help. A repeat x-ray in 1 week usually shows sclerosis or periosteal reaction. 

AP and Lateral of lower limb
Case courtesy of Dr Jeremy Jones, Radiopaedia.org. From the case rID: 9317
Periosteal reaction and callus formation in healing toddlers fracture
Case courtesy of Dr Sebastian Tschauner, Radiopaedia.org. From the case rID: 49123

But, a plain film x-ray may not be where it ends. Ultrasound is being explored as a possible diagnostic tool for toddler’s fracture, as sonography is used more and more for diagnosis of long bone fractures in children. The idea’s not a new one; a case report of three children in England in 2006 demonstrated that Point of Care Ultrasound Scan (POCUS) could be used to diagnose toddler’s fracture where initial x-rays did not show any fractures. They used the appearance of an elevated periosteum and a layer of low reflectivity superficial to the tibial cortex which suggests a fracture haematoma as a way of diagnosing an occult fracture. 

Cortical breach seen on ultrasound
Ultrasound image showing cortical breach in a toddler’s fracture. Image courtesy of Dr Casey Parker as found in Clinical Case 111: Toddler’s Tibia Tale published January 18, 2015, available at https://broomedocs.com/2015/01/clinical-case-111-toddlers-tibia-tale/

A recent pilot study by Carsen et al comparing ultrasound to radiographic diagnosis of toddler’s fractures looked at 27 children presenting with suspected toddler’s fractures. Five children had confirmed toddler’s fractures and of these five, three were identified correctly by x-ray at initial presentation and the other two were diagnosed with repeat x-ray at follow up appointments. All five children had their toddler’s fracture correctly identified using POCUS at their initial presentation. 

Radiograph showing Toddler fracture
AP x-ray of the same toddler’s fracture seen on ultrasound. Image courtesy of Dr Casey Parker as found in Clinical Case 111: Toddler’s Tibia Tale published January 18, 2015, available at https://broomedocs.com/2015/01/clinical-case-111-toddlers-tibia-tale/

Although there are limited studies evaluating the use of POCUS in the diagnosis of toddler’s fractures, the small number of studies and case studies available are promising. As a point of care test in someone with appropriate training, this is a convenient potential diagnostic tool, particularly given the potential to reduce radiation exposure for children.

Management

Toddler’s fractures do not need to be reduced and the management is largely supportive for 3-4 weeks. Standard treatment is a long leg back slab followed by a long leg walking cast. 

A number of retrospective studies have looked at rates of immobilising toddler’s fractures when the diagnosis is either confirmed or presumed. They show that children with confirmed toddler’s fractures are more likely to be immobilised. But… a series of 75 children with radiographic evidence of toddler’s fractures, by Schuh et al., looked outcome following a variety of treatments (cast/splint, controlled ankle movement boot, or no immobilisation). Those not immobilised had fewer follow up appointments and fewer repeat radiographs. Skin breakdown was reported in 17% of children, all of whom were in a splint or cast. Schuh et al. also found that children who were not immobilised walked much earlier than those who were immobilised in a controlled ankle movement (CAM) boot or splint. It was a mean of 4.1 days for the little ones not immobilised compared to 27.0 days for the smallies in a boot and a whopping 27.5 days for those in a cast or splint.  

Another retrospective study by Bauer and Lovejoy of 192 children, aged 9 months to 4 years, meeting criteria for a toddler’s fracture, showed an earlier return to weight-bearing in those immobilised with a CAM boot compared with a short leg cast (2.5 vs 2.8 weeks). Even when considering the seven children in this study who received no immobilisation, none of the fractures shifted. Sapru and Cooper also found that there were no complications with management in or out of a cast.  

There is now a move towards recommending immobilisation in a CAM boot or short leg cast or splint rather than in a long leg cast. Further studies are currently underway so watch this space!

What not to miss

A thorough history and examination should always be taken so as not to miss other diagnosis. If a child is not yet mobile, there must be a high suspicion for non-accidental injury. Fevers warrant consideration of septic arthritis or osteomyelitis. Malignancy and inflammatory conditions should also be considered. 

Aila’s initial x-ray showed a non-displaced spiral fracture of the distal third of her right tibia. She was placed in a long leg back slab and had a follow-up with the local orthopaedic service in the fracture clinic. Four weeks later she is running around and happily playing with her older brother.

 References

Alqarni, N., & Goldman, R. D. (2018). Management of toddler’s fractures. Canadian family physician Medecin de famille canadien64(10), 740–741. 

Bauer, J.M., Lovejoy, S.A. (2019) Toddler’s Fractures: Time to Weight-bear with Regard to Immobilization Type and Radiographic Monitoring. J Pediatr Orthop. Jul: 39(6), 314-317. 

Carsen, S., Doyle, M., Smit, K., Shefrin, A., Varshney, T. (2020) Point-of-care Ultrasound in the Emergency Department may provide more accurate diagnosis of toddler fractures than radiographs: A pilot study. Orthopaedic Proceedings. 102-B

Dunbar, J.S., Owen, H.F., Nogrady, M.B., McLeese, R., (1964) Obscure Tibial Fracture of Infants – The Toddler’s Fracture. Journal of the Canadian Association of Radiologists, Sep;15, 136-144. 

Fox, S. (2013) Toddler’s Fracture. Available at: https://pedemmorsels.com/toddlers-fracture/

Lewis, D. and Logan, P. (2006), Sonographic diagnosis of toddler’s fracture in the emergency department. J. Clin. Ultrasound. 34: 190-194. 

Pattishall, A.E. (2019) An updated approach to toddler fractures. J Urgent Care Med.  Available at: https://www.jucm.com/an-updated-approach-to-toddler-fractures/

Rasuli, B., Gaillard, F. Toddler Fracture. Available at: https://radiopaedia.org/articles/toddler-fracture

Royal Children’s Hospital Guidelines – Tibial Shaft Fractures. Available at: https://www.rch.org.au/clinicalguide/guideline_index/fractures/tibial_shaft_emergency/

Sapru, K., Cooper, J.G. (2014). Management of the Toddler’s fracture with and without initial radiological evidence. Eur J Emerg Med. Dec;21(6), 451-454. 

Schuh, A.M., Whitlock, K.B., Klein, E.J. (2016) Management of Toddler’s Fractures in the Pediatric Emergency Department. Pediatri Emerg Care.  Jul: 32(7), 452-454.

UpToDate – Tibial and fibular shaft fractures in children

Wang, C.C., Linden, K.L., Otero, H.J. (2017) Sonographic Evaluation of Fractures in Children. Journal of Diagnostic Medical Sonography. 33(3), 200-207. 

Wijtzes, N., Jacob, H., Knight, K., Thrust, S., Hann, G. (2020) Fifteen-minute consultation: The toddler’s fracture. Arch Dis Child Educ Pract Ed. 0, 1-6. 

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About Rhiannon McClaren

Rhiannon is a Paediatric Emergency Medicine trainee based in QLD, Australia. She is passionate about providing the best possible care for children and their families. Rhiannon is originally from Scotland and loves spending as much time as possible with her kids and sewing when there’s any spare time.

Author: Rhiannon McClaren Rhiannon is a Paediatric Emergency Medicine trainee based in QLD, Australia. She is passionate about providing the best possible care for children and their families. Rhiannon is originally from Scotland and loves spending as much time as possible with her kids and sewing when there’s any spare time.

3 Responses to "Toddler fracture"

  1. Benjamin Symon
    Benjamin Symon 4 months ago .Reply

    Thanks for this summary Rhiannon, I have to confess I feel pretty bad when I’m recommending a cast on a weight bearing toddler with a minor undisplaced #. It feels like I’m putting them at greater risk of another fall, adding a fair amount of stress to parents trying to keep their kid from running around and smashing the cast, and from what you’ve shown here, not much evidence of benefit to the child. (Although small n’s to be sure).

    • Dani Hall
      Dani Hall 3 months ago .Reply

      Thanks for your comment Benjamin. It looks like non-immobilisation, or at most with a short boot, is definitely the way some departments are headed. We’ll be keeping our eyes open for more studies looking into this!

  2. Christin
    Christin 2 weeks ago .Reply

    Thank you! My 3 1/2 year old daughter hurt her leg on the trampoline a few days ago and hasn’t been putting any weight on it. There is not swelling and she’s able to sleep without pain medicine, she just refuses to put weight on it. I took her to the pool today and she had a fun time floating around and playing, but still refused to put weight on it. We are hesitant to take her for x-rays because of the cost and likelihood that they probably won’t do anything anyway if it’a a hairline fracture. We’re gonna keep waiting it out for now and pray that it heals quickly on its own!

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