Uterine (decidual) Casts

Cite this article as:
Tara George. Uterine (decidual) Casts, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2021. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.32416

Lucy, 15, arrives in the ED sobbing hysterically clutching a wad of toilet paper. “I thought it was my period… only I had the worst period pains ever. I went to bed with a hot water bottle and it got worse and then… this came out”. She sobs, opening the tissue to show you a fleshy, pale triangular thing. approximately 5cm long.  “What is it? It’s disgusting. Have I got cancer? I’m not pregnant am I?”

Bodily secretions in tissues are rarely a source of delight but are common opening gambits. Vomit, faeces, sputum, vaginal discharge, worms, lice, blood clots and products of conception may be saved up and brought to the doctor to add colour to the history.    They present a challenge as often we don’t want to look. We don’t trust ourselves not to recoil or be disturbed and being presented with a “sample” early on can catch us off guard. It plays havoc with the “history, examination, management plan” structure we like to impose on our consultations.  In presentation terms, though, this is a gem of a presentation. We have an “Idea”, a “Concern” and it won’t be long before we elicit an “Expectation”.  Avoiding the enormous cue as it is thrust into your orbit, whilst tempting, risks dismissing the concerns. This can destroy any fledgling rapport and make the whole encounter even harder.  It is going to be necessary to take a history, but right now we have a distressed teenager, an unidentified object in a tissue and a lot of emotion. It may well be easiest to address this gift up front and just take a look. This is the time address the upset and the fear head on.

The “thing” looks like this:

A uterine or decidual cast occurs when the entire endometrial lining is shed in one piece. They are uncommon but frequently cause distress to the patient and can be extremely painful to pass.  A cast looks almost triangular in shape and if shed whole you can see the contours of the uterine cavity in a sort of fleshy model if you look closely.

Lucy tells you she had a Nexplanon contraceptive implant fitted about 6 weeks ago. She is not currently sexually active.  Her last period started the day before she had her implant fitted. She’s well otherwise with no past medical history. She had some light PV spotting yesterday and this morning but it has been light.  Since she passed the mass her pain has settled completely. Her observations are normal. She is happy to do a pregnancy test which is negative.  She just wants to know what it was, why it happened and if she can go home now.

The vast majority of uterine casts have no identifiable precipitating causes though there are case reports in association with Ectopic Pregnancy and they may be slightly more common in users of Hormonal Contraception though having had a cast is not a contraindication for continued use, nor are recurrent casts likely with continued use. The pain associated with passage of the cast is often severe – remember they are passing a 5cm mass through their cervix.

You reassure Lucy that this is not cancer, that she wasn’t pregnant and that this was a cast.  You explain what a cast is and that it is unlikely to recur.  She goes home much reassured and relieved.

You decide to send the cast to the lab for histology and a few days later a report lands in your in-tray which reads extensively decidualized endometrial tissue with minimal glandular structures lined by low cuboidal epithelium, consistent with a uterine or decidual cast. No chorionic villi were identified.

References

Nunes, R.D. and Pissetti, V.C., 2015. Membranous Dysmenorrhea–Case Report. Obstet Gynecol Cases Rev2, p.042.

Strauss, L., 2018. Fleshy Mass Passed Vaginally by a Young Woman. American family physician98(7), pp.449-450.

Lost Tampons

Cite this article as:
Tara George. Lost Tampons, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2021. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.32273

Maddy is 15. She presents with a one week history of a brown smelly discharge from the vagina. Her period ended eight days ago. At first, she thought it was just some spotting tailing off but now it’s heavier and smelly. Maddy is a gymnast and swimmer and has used tampons since she started her periods at 13. She has never been sexually active. Shyly, she admits that she “felt up inside” herself and thinks there might be a tampon up there. She’s not sure she removed the last one at the end of her last period, but she’s scared by the discharge and has come to see you for help.

Retained tampons are a common presentation to the emergency department and to GPs. Most GPs will tell you that the first retained tampon case they encounter is a rite of passage into the “real world of GP” and is usually a learning experience.

Here are some top tips for your first time

Classic Presentation

  • May or may not remember having “forgotten” a tampon
  • Foul smelling PV discharge, often watery and brownish
  • Usually well but embarrassed however don’t forget the risk of Toxic Shock Syndrome (TSS) – you will need to check observations/sepsis criteria and if scoring high consider this within your differential

Top Tips for Managing

There are no official published guidelines….

Management consensus from a group of GPs nationally:

  • Firstly encourage her to try and remove it herself by bearing down on the toilet slightly and using her fingers to grasp either the string or the tampon itself.
  • Have a look with a speculum +/- a bimanual exam (preferably in someone else’s room because the smell will linger).
  • Pull it down (with sponge-holding forceps) to where she can reach herself and send her to the toilet to remove and dispose of it.
  • If you must remove yourself have a specimen pot half full of water to put in in and shut the lid immediately.
  • It may be sensible to check that there are no more up there, especially if the patient reports that this has happened before, or if she tells you she habitually uses more than one tampon at a time. This is not advisable or safe, but sadly not uncommon especially in adults with menorrhagia.

In the context of the emergency department and Maddy:

  • Reassurance is key – she is embarrassed. If you are embarrassed too this is only going to end badly.
  • Reassure her that exploring her own body, including her vagina is completely normal.
  • Remind her that the string is sewn through the tampon so it is unlikely to have fallen off. Feeling inside for it and pulling it down is likely to be effective.
  • Encourage her to go to the patient toilet in private and to try to bear down and pull on whatever is up there to get it out. Lots of teenagers are embarrassed and ashamed to have touched their own vulva or vagina. Understanding that this is okay may be all you need to give her the confidence to solve her own problem.
  • If this is unsuccessful and you need to examine her and intervene, make sure you have all the kit you need. In some departments this may mean you have to refer to Gynae for them so it’s worth knowing what they will do.

What you need

  • A chaperone/assistant
  • A room with a lockable door
  • Disposable gloves
  • Speculum – probably a small/”virgin” size for Maddy
  • Lubricating jelly
  • A specimen pot, half full of water
  • Sponge-holding forceps
  • A decent light source

What to do

  • Examine externally first. If the tampon is just inside the vagina you may well see it and be able to easily remove it.
  • Pass the speculum and have a look – if you see the tampon then grasp it with sponge-holding forceps, pull it out and put it straight into a specimen pot with water in and dispose. 
  • If you insert the speculum and cannot see the tampon but can see the cervix clearly it is probably worth pulling back slightly and reinserting to ensure you visualise the posterior fornix too.
  • If she is unable to tolerate opening the speculum blades a gentle bimanual examination may allow you to feel the tampon and grasp it between your fingers to remove it.

Provided she is well and her observations are normal, she does not need antibiotics or any follow up other than reassurance and safety netting. If she is sexually active and/or the discharge is profuse or typical you may wish to consider swabs. If she has symptoms of TSS or Pelvic Inflammatory Disease you need to manage as per these conditions.

Maddy and her mum disappear to the toilet in the department. They return 10 minutes later. Maddy is tearful and says the tampon is definitely there but she’s too scared to pull it down. She says it feels really low down and uncomfortable. You take her to a quiet lockable room with one of the nurses and the kit list above. Explaining carefully what you are going to do you examine her vulva externally and can see the tampon just inside her vagina. You use some forceps to remove it, and having been well-educated by this article you put it straight into a pot of water and shut the lid tightly. You chat about whether there is a possibility there might be another tampon up there and Maddy assures you that this is not possible. You discharge her from the department, relieved, with some safety netting advice about remembering to remove future tampons and to come back if the discharge persists or if she becomes unwell.

Sedation for the agitated adolescent

Cite this article as:
Tessa Davis. Sedation for the agitated adolescent, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2016. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.8023

For paediatric ED doctors who come from a paediatric training background, dealing with the agitated adolescent can be very stressful. There is so much more to managing the agitated adolescent than just drugs, but sometimes sedation is necessary. As we are not used to sedating children in this way, choosing drugs and doses can be difficult.

This post is a brief overview of suggested management and is based on the NSW Health guidelines for managing patients with acute severe behavioural disturbance in ED, along with some tips from Joanne’s Morris’ PAC Conference talk.

1. Aim for verbal de-escalation. Talk to your patient in a non-threatening way.

2. Aim for oral sedation if the patient will co-operate:

  • Diazepam 0.2mg/kg up to 10mg orally – up to two doses
  • OR Olanzapine 5mg (if <40kg) and 10mg (if >40kg) – one dose only – acts within 20 minutes
  • OR Risperidone 0.02-0.04mg/kg up to 2mg – one dose only

When using olanzapine you can use quetiapine as an adjunct – start with 25 mg

Olanzapine and quetiapine can also be used for adolescents with eating disorders who are anxious about eating or NG insertion

Olanzapine can also be used in children with autism and can be helpful if blood tests are necessary

If the patient isn’t settling in 45 mins or the behaviour is worsening, then will need to consider IV options

3. Parenteral sedation

  • Droperidol 0.1-0.2mg/kg IM (max 10mg) – (some people would go with the higher dose to avoid having to repeat the injection)
  • If the patient does not settle within 15 minutes then give a second dose of droperidol as above
  • If the patient still does not settle, you will need to consider ketamine (4mg/kg IM or 1mg/kg IV) or midazolam (0.1-0.2mg/kg IM/IV – max of 20mg in 24 hours)

You will need to monitor the patient (on a SPOC chart) post each dose of parenteral sedation:

  • 5 minutely for 20 minutes
  • Then 30 minutely for 2 hours
  • Watch for respiratory depression with benzodiazepines – if there is then you can use flumazenil 5-10 mcg/kg titrated to respiratory rate (no consciousness)
  • Watch for acute dystonia with anti-psychotic drugs – treat with benztropine 0.02mg/kg IV)