Being a NICU parent and a doctor: Jasmine Antoine at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Jasmine Antoine. Being a NICU parent and a doctor: Jasmine Antoine at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2020. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.20672

The neonatal world is different from the remainder of paediatrics; it is one of the most confronting places a paediatric trainee will work. From your first day you may be asked to intubate the smallest patient you have ever seen. The next may involve the unsuccessful resuscitation of a term infant. Many of us will have never seen a child die before working in the neonatal intensive care unit. The NICU is as terrifying and challenging as it is wonderous. We care for those so small they can fit in your palm and so sick that you contemplate how many more medications can be prescribed and infused. In this presentation from DFTB18 – Science + Story, I explore why the majority of us leave the NICU burnt out. The challenges of working and parenting in NICU. The barriers we face to reduce this trauma and stress, as well as how we can make our experience in NICU better for ourselves and colleagues. I provide the unique perspective of being both an advanced trainee in Neonatology as well as a mother of twin premature babies.  

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Antenatal Counselling: Trish Woods at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Antenatal Counselling: Trish Woods at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18153

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story’ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families. Tickets for DFTB19, which will be held in London, UK, are now on sale from www.dftb19.com.

Being a NICU parent: Joanne and Scott Beedie at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Being a NICU parent: Joanne and Scott Beedie at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18131

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story’ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families. Tickets for DFTB19, which will be held in London, UK, are now on sale from www.dftb19.com.

Breast milk freezing – baby, it’s cold outside

Cite this article as:
Tessa Davis. Breast milk freezing – baby, it’s cold outside, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2016. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.9295

Freezing breast milk – whether you’ve seen it done during your NICU time, or done it yourself as a parent, it’s probably something that we’ve all had to consider. General advice is that it’s ok to freeze your breast milk for 6-9 months. But is that really true, or does freezing damage breast milk?

ILCOR 2015 – neonatal summary

Cite this article as:
Ashley Towers. ILCOR 2015 – neonatal summary, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2015. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.7717

The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) is a collaboration between resuscitation groups worldwide. Every few years, they do an enormous evidence based review of resuscitation science which informs resuscitation guidelines all over the world.

The 2015 ILCOR consensus document (International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations) was published on 15th October 2015 and covers all aspects of resuscitation for all patient populations.

If you’re anything like me, you’ll agree that wordy documents like this can’t be read quickly (in this case even the Executive Summary is 31 pages!) so to save us all some time, I’ve summarised the recommendations with a focus on neonates.