Paediatric resus update 2021

2021 Resuscitation Council UK Guidance: What’s new in paediatrics?

Cite this article as:
Anandi Singh, Jilly Boden and Vicki Currie. 2021 Resuscitation Council UK Guidance: What’s new in paediatrics?, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2021. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.33450

You are working in Paeds ED. The alert phone rings for a 2-year-old boy coming in a cardiac arrest. You hear some colleagues talking about Plasmalyte, capnography, and reduced respiration rates. Don’t panic! You had heard somebody mention that there were new resuscitation guidelines out though you’ve not read them yet. How much could have really changed?

Let’s take a step back. Where do these resus guidelines come from?

The Resuscitation Council UK recently issued their 2021 guidelines. They are tailored to UK clinical practice and derived from the European Resuscitation Council (ERC) 2021 Guidelines. The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) is responsible for the International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science with Treatment Recommendations (CoSTR). This consensus document is then used by international member organisations to develop guidelines. They are updated roughly every five years. CoSTR 2020 formed the ERC 2021 guidance.

The guideline development process utilised systematic reviews, scoping reviews, evidence updates and engagement from worldwide stakeholders (including members of the public and cardiac arrest survivors).

The 2021 Resuscitation Council UK Guidance covers both adult and paediatric basic and advanced life support. We have reviewed the corpus of generic guidance, some key additions and the main changes to both paediatric and neonatal life support algorithms.

The new guidelines do not specifically include the management of arrest secondary to COVID-19. You can be find them at https://www.resus.org.uk/covid-19-resources.

Epidemiology of Paediatric Cardiac Arrest

Epidemiology of paediatric cardiac arrest

Changes in paediatric resuscitation

Paediatric Basic Life Support

There are a few minor changes in 2021 to the paediatric BLS guidelines. They all apply to children up to 18 years of age (except for newborns).

Initial Assessment

Assess for signs of life simultaneously with the delivery of rescue breaths. If there are no signs of life, start chest compressions immediately after initial rescue breaths (you do not need to pause here).

Deliver five rescue breaths followed by ventilation breaths with compressions at a ratio of 15:2.

Emphasis on achieving high quality CPR

We should use mobile phones on loudspeaker for dispatcher guidance on how to deliver CPR or to summon emergency medical services (EMS) without leaving the victim.

Whilst the majority of paediatric cardiac arrests are respiratory in nature, effective chest compressions still play their part. Do these on a firm surface( so not a bed) and to a depth of at least one third the anterior-posterior diameter of the chest (or by 4cm in an infant and 5cm in a child). The rate remains at a rate of 100-120/min. The chest needs to fully recoil after each compression and around 80% of the CPR cycle should be composed of compressions.

Airway

The Resus Council recommend cuffed endotracheal tubes in children, if intubation is needed, and uncuffed tubes in neonates (Ed. note-we’ll look at this another day). Monitor this cuff pressures and try to keep it below 20mmHg.

Breathing

Target oxygen saturations (SpO2) of 94-98% with as little supplemental oxygen as possible. Avoid giving pre-emptive oxygen therapy without signs of hypoxemia or shock and try to avoid readings of up to 100% – unless in situations such as carbon monoxide poisoning. Hyperoxia appears to be almost as harmful as hypoxia.

High-flow nasal cannula oxygen (HFNC) or continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP)/non-invasive ventilation (NIV) support should be considered in children that have adeqaute respiratory drive but are not responding to low-flow oxygen. Bag-mask ventilation (BMV) is recommended in children with inadequate respiratory drive. If oxygenation/ventilation doesn’t improve, or ventilation may be ongoing, it is time for more advanced airway techniques – supraglottic airway devices (SGA) or endotracheal intubation.

Changes to paediatric resuscitation guidelines

Monitor capnography

End-Tidal CO2 monitoring is the gold standard, whether using an SGA or bag-valve-mask ventilation. Waveform capnography can reliably confirm tracheal tube placement when has a perfusing rhythm, as long as they are over two kilos in weight. There is a reasonable correlation between ETCO2 and PaCO2 but the guidelines do not go so far as suggesting a threshold ETCO2 or PaCO2 for stopping the resuscitation attempt.

What can the ETCO2 waveform tell us in resuscitation?

Use of end-tidal in paediatric resus

Circulation

No single finding can reliably identify the severity of circulatory failure. We still need to reassess frequently and after every intervention. This can be done by monitoring mean arterial blood pressure, trends in lactate, urine output and, if competent, ultrasound findings.

Vascular Access

Peripheral intravenous (IV) lines are the first choice for vascular access but it’s just two attempts and you are out. Then it is time to move on.

Intraosseous (IO) access is the primary rescue alternative. Remember it can be painful so give proper intraosseous analgesia before giving the first fluid bolus in every (awake) child.

A balanced approach to fluids

In children with shock, use a 10 mL/kg fluid bolus repeated up to 40-60 mls/kg.

How much should we give? There is an emphasis on smaller volumes with careful reassessment after each bolus to enable early identification of signs and symptoms of fluid overload. These include hepatomegaly, bilateral basal lung crackles, and jugular venous distention. Current evidence shows that a restrictive approach to fluid therapy is at least as effective as larger volumes.

In children with shock secondary to haemorrhage, we need to keep crystalloid boluses to a minimum (max 20mls/kg). Early use of blood products is the way to go in children who present with severe trauma.

Having decided to give fluid, what should we give? Balanced isotonic crystalloids (e.g. Plasmalyte) are the first choice with 0.9% sodium chloride being an acceptable alternative. Saline can induce hyperchloremic acidosis and may be associated with a worse outcome. The evidence for Hartmanns/Ringer’s lactate is still limited and shows ‘no more than a trend’ (?) towards a better outcome – so this is still left a bit unclear… Don’t use dextrose-based solutions for volume replacement – these will be redistributed rapidly away from the intravascular space and will cause hyponatremia and hyperglycaemia which may worsen neurological outcome.

Consider using permissive hypotension (mean arterial blood pressure (MAP) at 5th percentile for age) in traumatic injury. Be mindful that It is contraindicated in children with traumatic brain injury. You need to maintain a reasonable cerebral perfusion pressure. The Resus Council UK guidelines recommend giving tranexamic acid (TXA) to all children requiring transfusion after severe trauma and/or significant haemorrhage, as long as it is within three hours of injury

Vasoactive drugs need to be started early In children with persistent decompensated circulatory failure. Noradrenaline or adrenaline are recommended as first-line agents. Vasoactive drug choice may be directed by individual patient circumstances once more detailed information about the pathophysiology is available..

Dopamine is no longer recommended but can be used if adrenaline and noradrenaline are not available.

Cardiac Arrest in Special Circumstances

Specific approach to CPR needed during specific conditions such as cardiac surgery, neurosurgery, trauma, drowning, sepsis, and pulmonary hypertension. However, there are no major changes to any of these guidelines.

When managing traumatic cardiac arrest we need to fix the reversible causes.

Traumatic cardiac arrest guidelines

We need to start simultaneous chest compressions whilst treating these causes. This trumps adrenaline use. Though exceedingly rare we should think about thoracotomy in paediatric TCA patients with penetrating trauma with or without signs of life on ED arrival.

Extracorporeal Life Support (ECLS)

Extracorporeal cardiopulmonary resuscitation (E-CPR) is the implementation of veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (VA-ECMO) in a patient with refractory cardiac arrest. E-CPR should only be considered if it is readily available and there is a (presumed) reversible cause.

For specific subgroups of children with decompensated cardiorespiratory failure (e.g. severe refractory septic shock or cardiomyopathy or myocarditis and refractory low cardiac output), the pre-arrest use of ECLS can be lifesaving and provide end-organ support, preventing cardiac arrest.

Post-cardiac arrest care

Avoid hypoxia, hypotension and fever in children and infants who have a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) following cardiac arrest. Targeted temperature management of children post-ROSC should comprise active treatment with either normothermia or mild hypothermia and continuous invasive temperature monitoring.

Changes in adult resuscitation guidance

Are you curious about the big people?

For the adults, there are no major changes in ADULT BLS/ ALS 2021 guidelines. The guide states that a child is any person up to 18 years – in terms of when we switch from paediatric to adult algorithm. If the child looks like a child, we use the paediatric algorithm. If it turns out that your patient looks more youthful than they actually are then little harm will ensue. They also recommend a stepwise approach to airway management. The expert consensus is that: providers with a high first-pass success rate should perform tracheal intubation.

The use of adrenaline is controversial. We don’t have great evidence for either the dosing or the timing of doses. A large trial in the UK (PARAMEDIC 3, expected Autumn 2021) will look in more detail at the timing of adrenaline and the potential benefits of an IO first approach.

There is a greater emphasis on POCUS and ECMO. This reflects the increasing evidence as a rescue therapy in certain adult patients in cardiac arrest. There is an increasing role of point-of-care ultrasound (POCUS) in peri-arrest care for diagnosis, but it requires a skilled operator, and the need to minimise interruptions during chest compression.

As with the paediatric population: there is a greater recognition that patients with both in- and out-of-hospital cardiac arrest have premonitory signs, and that many of these arrests may be preventable.

What else is in the guidance?

Health inequality (HI) and it’s impact on cardiac arrest outcome

There is vast inequality in the incidence of cardiac arrest, use of bystander CPR and the distribution of public access defibrillators. Deprived areas, and areas with a greater proportion of residents from minority ethnic backgrounds, have a higher incidence of cardiac arrest, lower incidence of bystander CPR and lower access to public access defibrillators. This needs further discussion and research. Teaching CPR to children in all schools would be a way of improving some of these inequalities.

Improving education and systems can save (more) lives

50% of out-of-hospital cardiac arrests (OHCAs) are witnessed. Bystanders perform CPR in 70% of these. Public education is crucial in saving lives. In 2018, 59% of members of the public in the UK reported having received training in CPR and 19% in how to use an automated external defibrillator (AED).

In 2019, over 291,000 people in the UK were trained in CPR as part of World Restart a Heart Day. Teaching the essential core skills in resuscitation will improve patient survival.

How to get better at paediatric resus

Technology-enhanced education, as well as simulation, can be used to improve teaching and engage learners. Social media and smartphone apps can be used to engage the community. A new section has been added to the guidance named ’Systems Saving Lives’ with the intended audience being governments, managers in health and education systems, health care professionals, teachers, students and members of the public. By emphasising the importance of the connections along the Chain of Survival, we can improve the performance of resuscitation systems.

4 Key areas that have been highlighted are:

What's new in paediatric resus guidelines

Ethics

Another key area in the new guidelines is around integrating decisions about CPR in advanced treatment plans (e.g. Recommended Summary Plan for Emergency Care and Treatment (ReSPECT) process). The guideline highlights the need for communication strategies and interventions to support discussions with patients and their family around resuscitation.

What might we see in the next revision…

  • Could IO become the first choice route of adrenaline?
  • Will we still be using adrenaline in all arrest situations?
  • Will (ab)normal saline be removed entirely?
  • Will we have more concrete evidence on using Hartmann’s/ Ringer’s Lactate in resuscitation fluids?
  • Will we have more information on the barriers and motivators to bystander CPR and AED use in respect of ethnic, socio-economic, cultural and educational background?

Selected references for the updated Resuscitation Council UK guidelines

Resuscitation Council UK Guidelines 2021 https://www.resus.org.uk/library/2021-resuscitation-guidelines

Madar Jet al European Resuscitation Council Guidelines 2021: Newborn resuscitation and support of transition of infants at birth (2021). https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2021.02.014 ERC Guidelines 2021: https://cprguidelines.eu/

Wyckoff MH, ET AL. Neonatal Life Support Collaborators. Neonatal Life Support 2020 International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations. Resuscitation. 2020 Nov;156:A156-A187.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.resuscitation.2020.09.015 Epub 2020 Oct 21. PMID: 3309891

Supraglottic airway devices

Cite this article as:
Jessica Rogers. Supraglottic airway devices, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2021. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.32780

Endotracheal intubation (ETI) in children is thankfully rare and our first pass success rate could definitely do with some improvement.

It is difficult to compare the efficacy of various advanced airway techniques in children. There are ethical implications, of course, but also marked differences in ages and in the potential aetiology of the arrest. There is often time to talk with the intensive care team and make a plan based on the best airway for that given situation. Similarly, the operating theatre, home of many an airway trial, is a very different environment. We’ll look at advanced airways in cases of cardiac/respiratory arrest. Be mindful there will always be a difference in timing and skill set between out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) to in-hospital cardiac arrest (IHCA).

There are few actual studies comparing the advanced airway treatments used during cardiac arrest management in children. There are even fewer studies surrounding the use of supraglottic airways (SGAs) in children. Most of these are observational studies.

ILCOR currently recommends endotracheal intubation (ETI) as the ideal way to manage an airway during resuscitation. They also state that supraglottic airways are an acceptable alternative to the standard bag-valve-mask ventilation (BVM). There are very few clinical trials in children on which these recommendations are based (and certainly none of rigorous design in the last 20 years). Due to this lack of evidence, they commissioned a study as part of the Paediatric Life Support Task Force.

Lavonas EJ, Ohshimo S, Nation K, Van de Voorde P, Nuthall G, Maconochie I, Torabi N, Morrison LJ, DeCaen A, Atkins D, Bingham R. Advanced airway interventions for paediatric cardiac arrest: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Resuscitation. 2019 May 1;138:114-28.


Lavonas et al. (2018) carried out a systematic review and meta-analysis on the use of advanced airway interventions (ETI vs SGA), compared to BVM alone, for resuscitation of children in cardiac arrest. Only 14 studies were identified. 12 of these were suitable for inclusion in the meta-analysis. They were mostly focused on OHCA. There was a high risk of bias and so the overall quality of evidence was in the low to very low range. The key outcome measure was survival to hospital discharge with a good neurological outcome. The analysis suggested that both ETI and SGA were not superior to BVM.

So now, let’s cover some of the literature on the use of supraglottic airway devices. These are mostly based on studies in adults.

The ideal ventilatory device

  • …is easy to set up and insert by anyone so it doesn’t matter what the make-up of the team is
  • …is quick to set up and quick to insert. This reduces the time taken away from other important tasks and allowing that all-important ‘bandwidth’
  • …allows for minimal risk of aspiration
  • …provides a tight seal to allow for high airway pressures if needed
  • …is sturdy enough that the patient cannot bite through it and cut off their own oxygen supply
  • …provides an option to decompress the stomach via the same device
  • …has minimal risk of accidental misplacement or loss of airway once inserted

If this sounds too good to be true, it is. No one device combines all of these essential features. This leaves us deciding which is most suited to the patient in front of us.

sizing chart for supraglottic airway devices
Rather than tape the i-gel to the cheek it is often easier to use traditional tube ties to secure the airway

It is very difficult to compare SGAs with endotracheal tubes (ETT). An ETT is a ‘definitive airway’ that provides protection against aspiration. This does not mean that SGAs are a ‘lesser’ option. An SGA is still an ‘advanced airway’ and more effective than using a bag-valve-mask technique. It is important to remember that advanced airways have their pros and cons. Whilst they may improve a patients’ likelihood of survival with good neurological recovery, there can be associated complications.

Table showing advantages and challenges of bag-valve mask compared to supraglottic airway devices

The science behind supraglottic airways

So what does the science say? There are few trials in children but there have been several seminal papers released on advanced airway techniques in adults. Whilst not directly related to children, they do raise some interesting points of comparison between devices.

Benger JR, Kirby K, Black S, Brett SJ, Clout M, Lazaroo MJ, Nolan JP, Reeves BC, Robinson M, Scott LJ, Smartt H. Effect of a strategy of a supraglottic airway device vs tracheal intubation during out-of-hospital cardiac arrest on functional outcome: the AIRWAYS-2 randomized clinical trial. Jama. 2018 Aug 28;320(8):779-91.

This multicentre, cluster randomised trial, was conducted by paramedics across four ambulance services in England. It compared supraglottic devices to tracheal intubation in adult patients with OHCA looking at their effect on functional neurological outcome. This study only included patients over the age of 18. They found no statistically significant difference in 30-day outcome (the primary outcome measure) or in survival status, rate of regurgitation, aspiration or ROSC (secondary outcomes). There was a statistically significant difference when it came to initial ventilation success. Supraglottic airways required less attempts, but their use also lead to an increased likelihood of the loss of an established airway

So what does this mean? The main concern that gets bandied around when discussing SGAs is the higher risk of aspiration. If there was no difference in risk, would that change your mind?

Jabre P, Penaloza A, Pinero D, Duchateau FX, Borron SW, Javaudin F, Richard O, De Longueville D, Bouilleau G, Devaud ML, Heidet M. Effect of bag-mask ventilation vs endotracheal intubation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation on neurological outcome after out-of-hospital cardiorespiratory arrest: a randomized clinical trial. Jama. 2018 Feb 27;319(8):779-87.

This was a multicentre, randomised clinical trial in France and Belgium looking at OHCA over a 2-year period. Again this study enrolled adults over 18 years old. They looked at the non-inferiority of BVM vs ETI with regard to survival with favourable neurological outcome at 28 days. Responding teams consisted of an ambulance driver, a nurse and an emergency physician. The rate of ROSC was significantly greater in the ETI group but there was no difference in survival to discharge. Overall, the study results were inconclusive either way.

If survival to discharge is unaffected, should we all be spending time training and maintaining competency or should endotracheal intubation be kept only for those who practice it regularly in their day job?

Wang HE, Schmicker RH, Daya MR, Stephens SW, Idris AH, Carlson JN, Colella MR, Herren H, Hansen M, Richmond NJ, Puyana JC. Effect of a strategy of initial laryngeal tube insertion vs endotracheal intubation on 72-hour survival in adults with out-of-hospital cardiac arrest: a randomized clinical trial. Jama. 2018 Aug 28;320(8):769-78.


This cluster-randomised, multiple crossover design was carried out by paramedics/EMS across 27 agencies. It looked at adult patients receiving either laryngeal tube or endotracheal intubation and survival at 72 hours. Again, they only included adults over 18 with non-traumatic cardiac arrest. They found a ‘modest but significant’ improved survival rate in the LMA group and this correlated with a higher rate of ROSC. Unfortunately, this trial included a lot of potential bias and the study design may not be robust enough to back up the level of difference.

Could the survival rate be explained by first-pass success and less time spent ‘off the chest’ during initial resuscitation? No study is perfect. Always critically appraise for yourself and check if study results are applicable to your local population and own practice before changing anything.

More questions than answers

After reading the science (and please do go take a deeper dive into those papers and appraise them for yourselves), let’s tackle some common queries.

SGAs are so easy you can just whack it in and done!

No. Getting the SGA in is only the first step. Even then, you need to be sure you have picked the appropriate size and assessed for leaks. SGAs are much more likely to become dislodged and lead to an unexpected loss of airway. Generally, we are not as meticulous about securing them as we should be. Ideally, use a tube tie to secure it in place and monitor the position (in relation to the teeth). Some SGAs have a black line on the shaft that should line up with the incisors (beware this may only be present in the larger sizes). Just like ETTs, they require you to check for adequate ventilation via auscultation, ETCO2 and listening for an obvious leak.


It’s okay if there is a leak at the start as the gel will mould as it heats up

No. There is no evidence to suggest the shape of i-gels (this is usually the model clinicians are referring to in this instance) will mould to the inside of the larynx. Researchers have tried heating up the material and there is no statistical change in the leak. If you do have a significant leak, consider re-positioning, swapping out for a different size or using a different model. You may find a small leak that disappears over time. Over time, the airway jiggles around and sits better.


You should always decompress the stomach when you put in an LMA

Possibly. This is not routinely found in guidelines as it is seen as more of a fine-tuning procedure. It can take time and resources away from other critical tasks (such as chest compressions, IV access, optimal ventilation) but if you have the resources to do so, without affecting the basics of good resuscitation care, then it is a good option if ventilation is not as optimal as it could be. This is particularly important in children. We know that they are at higher risk of diaphragmatic splinting from overzealous ventilation so the early insertion of a nasogastric tube can really improve things.

Laryngoscopy should be used before every SGA insertion

Possibly. Some places have started to mandate laryngoscopy because they have missed obstruction by a foreign body, or to allow better suctioning and improve the passage for insertion. There is an argument that the SGA may sit better if inserted with the aid of a laryngoscope as, in a number of cases, it hasn’t been inserted deeply enough. Laryngoscopy is a complex skill, that takes regular practice and comes with its own challenges (damage to mouth/teeth, additional time taken, higher skill set needed).

Once inserted, SGAs can be used alongside continuous chest compressions

Possibly. This really needs to be considered on a case-by-case basis. SGAs are an advanced airway and can be used with continuous chest compressions to increase cerebral perfusion pressures. It is up to the individual clinician to monitor and decide if the ventilatory support they are giving is adequate during active compressions. In cases where the arrest is secondary to hypoxia (as in many paediatric arrests) it may be easier, and more useful, to continue with a 30:2 or 15:2 ratio to ensure good tidal volumes are reaching the lung. Some studies have shown little difference comparing the 30:2 approach to continuous ventilation.

Troubleshooting

This is the same in both SGAs and ETTs.

  • Patient issues – vomit, secretions, bronchospasm, position, change in intrathoracic / intrabdominal pressures, and in SGAs there is a risk the epiglottis has moved and is covering the opening of the device
  • Device issues – position, size, biting/kinking of an ETT
  • Equipment issues – ventilator settings, connections, oxygen supply

Remember, if you are really struggling, take a second to consider if you might be in a “can’t intubate, can’t ventilate” type of situation. Check out this article, which takes a closer look at this rare scenario.

The bottom line is, we just do not know what is best in our paediatric population. Due to lack of scientific evidence, we often have to rely more on operator skill, available equipment and previous experience.

Selected resources on supraglottic airways

Check out the ‘Roadside to Resus: Supraglottic airways’ podcast from The Resus Room

PHEMcast also have podcasts on ‘The LMA’ and ‘The collapsed infant’

IO, IO – It’s off to work we go!

Cite this article as:
Andrew Tagg. IO, IO – It’s off to work we go!, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2016. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.7843

Intraosseous access is one of those skills that is rarely used but can be a lifesaver. In the critically ill child IV access can be challenging. It is easy to get tunnel vision and try and try again to insert a cannula whilst losing focus on the reason for access – circulatory support. In order to achieve mastery in any skill one must undertake deliberate practice, using both mental and physical simulation.

Here’s how you can produce your own IO trainer for a few cents:

IMG_4376  1. You are going to need a couple of delicious chocolate bars, some gloves and  a roll of 15cm wide plaster of Paris.
IMG_4377  2. Keeping the wrapper on the chocolate (you may want to eat it later after  all) apply six to eight layers of plaster and allow to dry.
IMG_4378  3. Here is the completed product.
IMG_4382  4. One of the trainers has been wrapped in an attempt to simulate skin. I  have found that a looser glove works best.  It also makes the trainer easier to  transport without – you no longer cover your clothes in plaster dust.
IMG_4383  5. Unlike the more traditional chicken bones you can have one or two of these  trainers made up in advance for just-in-time teaching.

This is not a new technique.  It’s even been written up in the literature here.

 

Reference

Bateman ED, Bateman A. Intraosseus access simulation: the Crunchie solution. Emerg Med J. 2010 Dec;27(12):961

ILCOR 2015 – paediatric summary

Cite this article as:
Ashley Towers. ILCOR 2015 – paediatric summary, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2015. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.7723

The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) is a collaboration between resuscitation groups worldwide. Every few years, they do an enormous evidence based review of resuscitation science which informs resuscitation guidelines all over the world.

The 2015 ILCOR consensus document (International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations) was published on 15th October 2015 and covers all aspects of resuscitation for all patient populations.

If you’re anything like me, you’ll agree that wordy documents like this can’t be read quickly (in this case even the Executive Summary is 31 pages!) so to save us all some time, I’ve summarised the recommendations with a focus on paediatrics.

ILCOR 2015 – neonatal summary

Cite this article as:
Ashley Towers. ILCOR 2015 – neonatal summary, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2015. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.7717

The International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation (ILCOR) is a collaboration between resuscitation groups worldwide. Every few years, they do an enormous evidence based review of resuscitation science which informs resuscitation guidelines all over the world.

The 2015 ILCOR consensus document (International Consensus on Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation and Emergency Cardiovascular Care Science With Treatment Recommendations) was published on 15th October 2015 and covers all aspects of resuscitation for all patient populations.

If you’re anything like me, you’ll agree that wordy documents like this can’t be read quickly (in this case even the Executive Summary is 31 pages!) so to save us all some time, I’ve summarised the recommendations with a focus on neonates.

ILCOR’s draft guidelines

Cite this article as:
Ben Lawton. ILCOR’s draft guidelines, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2015. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.6604

On October 15th This year ILCOR (International Liaison Committee on Resuscitation) will publish its updated recommendations in Circulation. ILCOR’s guidance is currently available in draft form at https://volunteer.heart.org/apps/pico/Pages/default.aspx where public comment is invited.