Gender Identity: Stephen Stathis at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Gender Identity: Stephen Stathis at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18596

Associate Professor Stephen Stathis has fellowships in both paediatrics and psychiatry. As Medical Director of the Child and Youth Mental Health Services in Brisbane, Australia. He heads up the gender dysphoria service at Queensland Children.s Hospital and in this talk he expands the DFTB queericulum.

In 2017 Aidan Baron started a conversation about the challenges and rewards of communicating with all colours of the LGBTQIA+ rainbow. In this talk Stephen talks about the development of gender expression and helps clarify some of the misunderstandings about being gender diverse. By improving our knowledge, allowing these conversations to take place, we hope we can provide a safe environment for children to be able explore their concerns, without fear of judgement.

 

 

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story‘ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families. Tickets for DFTB19, which will be held in London, UK, are now on sale from www.dftb19.com.

 

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DFTB go to New York

Cite this article as:
Andrew Tagg. DFTB go to New York, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.17016

I first heard of the FemInEM crew in Dublin. Dara Kass, Jenny Beck-Esmay and Stacey Poznanski took to the stage to talk about the birth of FemInEM, first as a blog then as a resource to effect change in the conversation around gender and equity in emergency medicine. Since then they have grown to be a leading voice in this area.

Their first sell out conference, FIX17, in New York brought together a unique set of voices and when the call came out for pitches to speak at FIX18 I thought it would be the perfect place for me to tell a story. This blog post isn’t about my tale – you can read A short story about deathand life here – but about something else.

I consider myself well-travelled, having spent almost 5 years of my life working as a doctor on board cruise ships, but hearing the talks at FIX18 made me realise I a still living in my own little bubble. Everything I hear via Twitter or other forms of social media comes pre-filtered by the source. So if I only follow white hetero-males they inform my worldview. The conference reminded me that there are other voices and other realities.

 

Sex and gender

In a conference where I was clearly in the minority, I was constantly reminded of things I have just taken for granted. Nick Gorton, a transman,  really opened my eyes when he told the audience that life had been like playing a video game on hard mode then, when he became a man, everything just switched over to easy. Look out for his great talk when it comes out…

 

Race

You only have to read the newspaper headlines on any given day to see how race plays a role in the public perception of a person. To hear Arabia Mollette say that she will never be seen as a woman first when she walks into a room because she is a person of colour made me feel uncomfortable. I’d like to think that I don’t see the world that way, but we all have our implicit biases. Don’t think you are biased? Then try out one of the Harvard Implicit Bias tests over at Project Implicit.

 

Privilege

A lot of medics come from a place of privilege, parents with degree level education and jobs that pay well. Many have parents that are, or were, doctors.  Regina Royan spoke of a different type of upbringing, of families struggling to make ends meet, and of the hidden challenges this brings from the start of medical training – not just in the shockingly high costs to apply to medical school in the US but also on things like electives and placements away from your home base.

 

I have lived, comfortably, within my own little bubble of existence. FemInEM has challenged me to expand my worldview, to listen to dissenting voices, and ask more questions.

 

For more accounts of FIX18 then read these accounts…

Penny Wilson – Getting my feminist FIX in New York

Shannon MacNamara – Telling stories to FIX things

Annie Slater – We support, We Amplify, We Promote

 

Are there too few women presenting at paediatric conferences?

Cite this article as:
Davis, T. et al. Are there too few women presenting at paediatric conferences?, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.16879

Sometimes we have a great idea for a paper but try as we might we cannot get it published in the traditional way. So what better means of disseminating knowledge than publishing it right here, on the Don’t Forget the Bubbles website? Given that this is the week of FIX18, the Feminem Idea eXchange, it seems like there is no better time like the present to discuss female presenters at paediatric conferences.