DFTB in EMA #5 – Sticks and stones may break some bones

Cite this article as:
Andrew Tagg. DFTB in EMA #5 – Sticks and stones may break some bones, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2016. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.8055

This month in the EMA the DFTB team look at how we might treat a simple forearm fracture.

“Up to a quarter of the paediatric population of the UK present to an ED annually with a large number being due to falls. High-risk activities such as scooter riding, climbing on monkey bars and backyard trampolines are partially to blame although the implementation of safety netting for trampolines has led to a reduction in injuries.”

You can read the article here.

Reference:

Tagg, A., Goldstein, H., Davis, T., and Lawton, B. (2016) Sticks and stones may break some bones.Emergency Medicine Australasia, doi: 10.1111/1742-6723.12531.

DFTB in EMA #4 – Spoonful of sugar: Improving the palatability of emergency department visits for children and their families

Cite this article as:
Andrew Tagg. DFTB in EMA #4 – Spoonful of sugar: Improving the palatability of emergency department visits for children and their families, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2016. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.8049

Whilst it has been available online for some time now the fourth EMA article from the DFTB team has just hit doormats across Australia.

“Pain, fever, fatigue and fear can all add to anxiety and distress for unwell children and their families, as well as making assessment of their clinical state even more difficult. This article aims to describe some ways of helping the medicine go down for your paediatric emergency patients.”

Click here for the link to the full article – ‘Spoonful of sugar’

Reference:

Lawton, B., Davis, T., Goldstein, H., and Tagg, A. (2015) Spoonful of sugar: Improving the palatability of emergency department visits for children and their families. Emergency Medicine Australasia, 27:504506. doi: 10.1111/1742-6723.12506.

DFTB in EMA #3 – Easing the Wheeze

Cite this article as:
Henry Goldstein. DFTB in EMA #3 – Easing the Wheeze, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2015. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.7662

The team at DFTB had our third article published in the series for Emergency Medicine Australasia Journal.

Wheezing children commonly present to the ED. Bronchiolitis, preschool wheeze and asthma are common causes of such presentations. It is important to note that the term ‘wheeze’ is frequently misused by parents to describe a number of respiratory noises, including transmitted upper airway sounds and stridor.[1] Wheeze is, in itself, a symptom manifested by ‘a continuous whistling sound during breathing that suggests narrowing or obstruction in some part of the respiratory airways’.[2] One British study reported that 29.3% of children have had a wheeze by the age of three, and 30% of preschoolers with recurrent wheeze are diagnosed with asthma by 6 years of age.[3, 4] This article briefly reviews the diagnosis and management of preschool wheeze, while considering recent guidelines on bronchiolitis and asthma.

Click here to read the full article – “Easing the wheeze.”

Reference:

Goldstein, H., Tagg, A., Lawton, B. and Davis, T. (2015), Easing the wheeze. Emergency Medicine Australasia, 27: 384–386. doi: 10.1111/1742-6723.12463

DFTB in EMA #2 – identifying the sick febrile child

Cite this article as:
Tessa Davis. DFTB in EMA #2 – identifying the sick febrile child, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2015. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.7321

The team at DFTB had our second article published in the series for Emergency Medicine Australasia Journal.

Healthcare professionals who do not meet sick children on a regular basis are often anxious about missing a serious bacterial infection in a child. Even for those of us working solely in paediatrics, there is still the same fear of sending home a pyrexial child without recognising how unwell they are. Each individual needs to have a system in place, and a process to work through, when assessing the child who is febrile with no focus of infection. A combination of history, physical assessment and physiological markers can be used for correct identification.

Don’t Forget The Bubbles in Print

Cite this article as:
Andrew Tagg. Don’t Forget The Bubbles in Print, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2015. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.7033

The team at DFTB are extremely proud to announce our first article in a series for Emergency Medicine Australasia.

At Don’t Forget the Bubbles, a paediatric FOAM online resource, we take evidence-based medicine and put a practical spin on it. Our aim for this series is to do just that. Throughout this series we will focus on paediatric-specific topics relevant to Emergency Medicine practice. Our first article puts the spotlight on paediatric resuscitation.

With the current ILCOR guidelines1 up for revision this year, a draft update of the Paediatric section has been posted for public comment. The core tenets of Paediatric resuscitation look likely to remain unchanged with the emphasis remaining on an ABC approach rather than the CAB suggested for adults. Here, we look at practical ways to improve our success rates when managing paediatric airways, oxygenation, and access.