There are people with games: Vic Brazil at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. There are people with games: Vic Brazil at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.19086

The  audience at DFTB18 were privileged to attend a series of sessions from team at Simulcast, the premier podcast for all things sim and debriefing. 

In this first talk of the session Vic Brazil interviews Kara Allen about the place of simulation and asks ‘Is at really all that?‘ Kara Allen is a consultant anaesthetist at the Royal Melbourne Hospital and Clinical Lead at Monash Simulation. Whilst sim seems like an exciting way of doing ‘stuff’ and we all love the chance to get out of our respective departments and play let’s- pretend is it fit for purpose?

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story‘ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families.

DFTB19 has just a handful of main conference tickets left but there are still spots for some of the pre-conference workshops.

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

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The Collapsed Cardiac Child: Kath Browning Carmo at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. The Collapsed Cardiac Child: Kath Browning Carmo at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18978

There is nothing like the thought of dealing with a shocked neonate to strike the fear of the almighty into the most experienced doctor. If you are lucky enough to have Kath Browning Carmo on speed dial then you may be a little more relaxed but if you don’t here she is to offer some words of comfort.

(Kath has chosen Moonlight Sonata as her ringtone so she gets woken gently rather than in a fluster – what a great idea: Ed)

Here’s a sketch note from the talk by @char_durand

If you want to get a better idea of some of the congenital abnormalities that can occur then take a look at these animations from Cincinatti Children’s.

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story‘ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families.

DFTB19 has already sold out but there are still spots for some of the pre-conference workshops.

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

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Selected References

Evans NJ, Archer LN. Postnatal circulatory adaptation in healthy term and preterm neonates. Archives of disease in childhood. 1990 Jan 1;65(1 Spec No):24-6.

Legal and Ethical Quandaries: Ian Summers at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Legal and Ethical Quandaries: Ian Summers at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18919

When most of us think of ethics and law our eyes roll and we picture Rumpole of the Bailey and quiet Sunday afternoons in front of the television. But his time Ian Summers came up with something unique. Pushing the boundaries of simulation as an educational medium he introduced us to a series of hypotheticals. Take your time to watch rather than just listen to your iDevice. You’ll learn about ethical practice in paediatrics but if you pause, take a step back, and press play again, you’ll see a masterclass of simulation in action.

 

 

 

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story‘ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families.

 

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

 

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Paediatric Murmurs: Ari Horton at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Paediatric Murmurs: Ari Horton at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18861

Ari Horton is many things – an advocate for kindness, a Cordon Bleu trained pastry chef and, just very occasionally, a paediatric cardiologist. Andrew Tagg remembers the day Ari found his calling. Working as a paediatric ED resident in Melbourne’s inner west he came to present a patient. He could barely sit still and his grin threatened to infect the fishbowl as he announced, “I found a murmur!”

We may not all be as acoustically gifted as Ari but that thing we wield around our necks is not just for listening for wheezes or for distracting toddlers.

At 3:30am in emergency overnight,
You got a seriously worrisome fright.
That harsh sound whooshing through the chest,
Try hide your concern, you say “It’s for the best”.
Is it innocent or the beginning of the end,
Go back to the basics they’re your best friend.

Horton’s distraught, his heart is fraught.
Stress fills his tired mind, luckily he left his steth behind.
Numbers and statistics running through his head,
But he stood still watching the child from the end of his bed.
By 9am poor old Horton, more dead than alive,
Had picked, searched and listened to more than 9005

Examination is a dynamic process they say,
Watching the kid run this and that way.
See them feed, sleep, run, jump and cry,
Do some special tests before you say goodbye.
A person’s a person no matter how small

It’s the real story that captures us all.
A murmur’s just a murmur no matter how loud
I’ve learnt my lessons and I’m so proud.
This child is healthy and safe because we cared
Cardiac fellowship awaits because I dared.

Horton Hears A What? Ari Horton (2018)

 

 

 

Here is a little sketchnote by @gracie_leo of the talk:

 

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story‘ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families.

DFTB19 has just a handful of main conference tickets left but there are still spots for some of the pre-conference workshops.

 

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

 

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Daily JA, Bolin E, Eble BK. Teaching pediatric cardiology with meaning and sense. Congenital heart disease. 2018 Jan;13(1):154-6.
Haney I, Ipp M, Feldman W, McCrindle BW. Accuracy of clinical assessment of heart murmurs by office based (general practice) paediatricians. Archives of disease in childhood. 1999 Nov 1;81(5):409-12.
Keren R, Tereschuk M, Luan X. Evaluation of a novel method for grading heart murmur intensity. Archives of pediatrics & adolescent medicine. 2005 Apr 1;159(4):329-34.
Lefort B, Cheyssac E, Soulé N, Poinsot J, Vaillant MC, Nassimi A, Chantepie A. Auscultation While Standing: A Basic and Reliable Method to Rule Out a Pathologic Heart Murmur in Children. The Annals of Family Medicine. 2017 Nov 1;15(6):523-8.
Mahnke CB, Nowalk A, Hofkosh D, Zuberbuhler JR, Law YM. Comparison of two educational interventions on pediatric resident auscultation skills. Pediatrics. 2004 May 1;113(5):1331-5.
Noponen AL, Lukkarinen S, Angerla A, Sepponen R. Phono-spectrographic analysis of heart murmur in children. BMC pediatrics. 2007 Dec;7(1):23.

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Vascular Access: Amanda Ullman at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Vascular Access: Amanda Ullman at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18669

We were pleased that Amanda Ullman took up our offer to speak at DFTB after the great post she and the Vascular Access Management Service wrote for us on management of paediatric central access devices. This talk comes complete with trigger warnings. We’ve all been in the situation when we have been confronted with doughy armed toddlers and no sign of a vein in site. The parents, and that patient, are relying on you to get it right.


Given the prime directive of physicians of Primum Non Nocere (First Do No Harm) it is worth considering if we should be cannulating the child in the first place. In a study by Holloway et al. (2017) they found that 22% of PIVCs were unused after insertion. With a success rate of around 60% in our well children, we really to sway the odds further in our favour.

But is also worth considering the flipside – cannulation may be less painful than heel prick for blood sampling in neonates. Amanda asks us to consider if you are the right person to put in that cannula. Should you just ‘give it a go anyway’? Have you been up half the night and can barely focus? Have you just missed you last six cannulae and have something to prove?

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story‘ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families.

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

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Selected References

Deitcher SR, Gajjar A, Kun L, Heideman RL. Clinically evident venous thromboembolic events in children with brain tumors. The Journal of pediatrics. 2004 Dec 1;145(6):848-50.

Hollaway W, Broeze C, Borland ML. Prospective observational study of predicted usage of intravenous cannulas inserted in a tertiary paediatric emergency department. Emergency Medicine Australasia. 2017 Dec;29(6):672-7.

Kleidon TM, Cattanach P, Mihala G, Ullman AJ. Implementation of a paediatric peripheral intravenous catheter care bundle: A quality improvement initiative. Journal of paediatrics and child health. 2019 Jan 31.

Stolz LA, Cappa AR, Minckler MR, Stolz U, Wyatt RG, Binger CW, Amini R, Adhikari S. Prospective evaluation of the learning curve for ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous catheter placement. The journal of vascular access. 2016 Jul;17(4):366-70.

Takashima M, Schults J, Mihala G, Corley A, Ullman A. Complication and failures of central vascular access device in adult critical care settings. Critical care medicine. 2018 Dec 1;46(12):1998-2009.

Ullman AJ, Cooke M, Kleidon T, Rickard CM. Road map for improvement: point prevalence audit and survey of central venous access devices in paediatric acute care. Journal of paediatrics and child health. 2017 Feb;53(2):123-30.

Gender Identity: Stephen Stathis at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Gender Identity: Stephen Stathis at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18596

Associate Professor Stephen Stathis has fellowships in both paediatrics and psychiatry. As Medical Director of the Child and Youth Mental Health Services in Brisbane, Australia. He heads up the gender dysphoria service at Queensland Children.s Hospital and in this talk he expands the DFTB queericulum.

In 2017 Aidan Baron started a conversation about the challenges and rewards of communicating with all colours of the LGBTQIA+ rainbow. In this talk Stephen talks about the development of gender expression and helps clarify some of the misunderstandings about being gender diverse. By improving our knowledge, allowing these conversations to take place, we hope we can provide a safe environment for children to be able explore their concerns, without fear of judgement.

 

 

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story‘ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families. Tickets for DFTB19, which will be held in London, UK, are now on sale from www.dftb19.com.

 

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

 

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