Ultrasound Guided Peripheral Vascular Access

Cite this article as:
Trent Calcutt. Ultrasound Guided Peripheral Vascular Access, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2021. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.23253

One of my favourite things in paediatrics is the expanding role of ultrasound guided vascular access.

When I started as a paediatric registrar, I’d just finished an adult ICU term where I’d become spent a majority of time supporting provision of a vascular access service, and as part of this had become a PICC line insertion instructor. Eventually, I got to the point where I dreamt of abstract grey shapes. But then I started a paediatric job in a regional hospital where it seemed that ultrasound was used for vascular access rarely if at all. Initially, I thought there must have been something different about paediatric vascular access that I was unaware of. One day, when looking after a young lady with Rett’s who was known to be difficult to cannulate, I reached for the ultrasound. In the five years since, ultrasound has been a standard part of my practice in achieving vascular access in children, with technique adapted to fit the age of the patient.

Ultrasound-guided vascular access and paediatrics seem like such a natural partnership. The concept of a DIVA (“difficult IV access”) patient is receiving increasing interest and research. Criteria for a DIVA can include prematurity, inability to see or feel a vessel, or an episode of multiple prior attempts. These criteria would be met by a huge number of the kids we care for, in particular toddlers or the previously premature infant. 

Chonky baby arm
Spot the veins

Why is ultrasound not the first-line adjunct in these tricky kids? It’s probably multifactorial, but certainly, ultrasound is more difficult in children than adults. Its utility is varied in the NICU context and for infants under 2.5kg, although can still have a role with a modification to technique. It’s also harder to learn ultrasound in a population who are scared, angry, impatient and poorly tolerant of a prolonged period of needle-through-skin. For these reasons, I think that there is less appeal to replace the familiar (cannulating without an ultrasound), with the unfamiliar (cannulating with an ultrasound). As I’d experienced, this also leads to a culture where ultrasound is infrequently utilized, decreasing the likelihood of implementation by new or more junior staff.

Once the learning investment is made to reach a proficient level of ultrasound competency (about 20 cannulas in adults) the potential benefits are significant. Decreased time spent performing a procedure, decreased number of attempts and subsequent patient trauma, and increased cannula longevity are all achievable.

I’ve spent a lot of time thinking success optimisation in paediatric ultrasound guided cannulation, both during my own development of proficiency and then in an effort to verbalize this skill when educating others. Below are my 5 top tips to enhance your ultrasound-guided cannulation skills:

I’m hoping that some of these words may help avoid some bits of the inevitable trial and error process that comes with learning a new skill.

There is sometimes a general impression of both practical and personal inconvenience in using ultrasound for vascular access. An ultrasound may not be nearby. There is the fear of “looking silly” in front of other people, as turning on, adjusting, and then physically coordinating the use of the ultrasound may be unfamiliar. During the period of establishing proficiency, an approach to decreasing this sense of unfamiliarity is to get in the habit of bringing the ultrasound with you do a cannula. Turn on and optimize the ultrasound to view vessels, and spend a period mapping out candidates for cannulation using your non-cannulating hand. Draw on the patient with a skin pen if you want to keep track of the best sites. Then, discard the ultrasound and cannulate using whatever technique is most familiar to you, but with the added knowledge of vessel location, depth, size, and direction. If this becomes a routine and almost ritualistic process, the mental barrier created by a lack of familiarity with ultrasound settings and holding the transducer should decrease over time. It is a relatively small step from performing vascular mapping to placing a cannula under real-time ultrasound guidance.

The preparation otherwise is quite straightforward. In addition to the set up that you use for all other cannulas, you need the following four things:

  • An ultrasound with a linear array probe (the smaller the footprint and the higher the frequency, the better)
  • Sterile lubricating gel and some form of sterile barrier to cover your probe (this varies institutionally)
  • Cavilon wipe or skin prep (securement devices / dressings / tape doesn’t like to stick to ultrasound gel so will need some encouragement)
  • An extra person (one of your hands is out of action, so you need an additional person to perform the task that your non-dominant hand would normally do; this is typically stabilization of the distal limb)

The ultrasound sits on the opposite side of the bed to the operator, so as to minimize truncal movement in looking from the puncture site to screen. Aside from making sure the correct probe is selected, the only 3 settings you need to know how to adjust are depth (typically as shallow as possible), gain (similar to a ‘brightness’ setting to highlight blood-filled vessels), and a midline marker (for physical-digital landmark referencing).

As alluded to above, pre-scanning is a useful skill even in the absence of cannulating under real-time ultrasound guidance. It’s a good idea to scope out the most appropriate vessels and puncture sites prior to picking up your cannula. Essentially the objective is to place a cannula within a vessel with as few attempts as possible, as quickly as possible, with as little pain as possible, and in a site that will provide the greatest longevity. Characteristics of vessels that tend to correlate with these outcomes are:

  • long and straight stretches
  • vessel 6mm or less below the surface
  • vessels greater than 2mm in diameter
  • vessels that don’t cross a joint (provides freedom of movement and less extravasation)
  • vessels without upstream thrombosis or obstruction

Mid-forearm vessels often meet the above criteria.

The greater length of cannula able to be placed within the vessel can correlate with longevity, however larger cannula diameter may increase the phlebitis and decrease longevity. This requires consideration of the balance between length and diameter of device. Of the commonly available devices, a good balance is a blue cannula (22G). There are several specialised less widely available devices that are longer versions of small diameter cannulae (24G and 22G).

In practical terms, to find these vessels you can start in the antecubital fossa (more familiar area for most of us) and track them down, or plonk down on the forearm and pan circumferentially. Scanning in the short axis / transverse axis / cross-sectional view tends to work best in kids. To assess suitability, translate the probe up and down along a vessel to get an idea of the direction. If it’s running diagonally, rotate your probe until it’s running along the same plane as the vessel to act as a mental reminder of the angle/direction that you need to insert your cannula. Pick the specific spot on the vessel that you’d like to puncture, bearing in mind that you will be puncturing the skin millimetres back from that point. Pick the patch of the vein that is the longest, straightest, shallowest, and biggest. Have a second fallback site planned out elsewhere for if required. Lastly, make sure to track the vein proximally as far as you can to ensure that it doesn’t run into a large thrombosed/occluded/recannalizing patch of vessel.

Obscure angles make things more challenging, in my experience. Right angles and parallel lines are your friends because they assist in mental unburdening and allow you to devote energy to troubleshooting issues. As mentioned above, map the vessel prior to puncture. Part or all of a vein will often wander diagonally along its journey, so approaching from the wrong direction increases the likelihood of punching through the side of the vessel. The centre of the image corresponds to the arrow/marker along the long edge of the probe, so you have a reference point between digital (screen) and physical (skin). Use the ultrasound as a mental reminder of your plane of approach; rotate the probe until the vessel is consistently sitting in the very centre of your image as you plane up and down. In other words, the ultrasound image is perfectly perpendicular to the plane of the vessel.

Speaking of right angles, I prefer to keep the ultrasound at right angles to the surface that you’re scanning. Angling back and forth creates a loss of contact and a distorted image as the ultrasound bounces of structures and does not return to the transducer. This creates a less clear image where vessels artificially look larger. If you need to change your view, translate/glide the probe along the skin, rather than introducing angle. It can be useful to temporarily angle the transducer perpendicular to the shaft of the cannula if you lose sight of it as this will light it up more clearly.

This is a big one. Thinking of your cannulation as a two-phase puncture process is something that I find extremely helpful. Your objective is not to puncture the skin and end up inside the vessel in a single action, and in fact, attempting to do this seems decrease the likelihood of success. 

 

Puncture Phase 1

Puncture 1 is the process from skin puncture to positioning the tip of your cannula on the superficial wall of the vessel. To achieve this, align your probe to achieve a view with the vessel in the centre of the image. Puncture the skin with the cannula a few millimetres distal to the probe. This bit is painful, so do this with a decisive action so that 2-3 mm of the cannula is within the soft tissue. Increase your angle of insertion to 30-45°. Your next objective is to find the tip of the cannula. Moving your non-dominant (ultrasound) hand, translate/slide the probe towards the puncture site until a glimmering white dot becomes apparent in your image. Once you are convinced that you are viewing your cannula, you need to ensure that you are viewing the tip at all times.

The most important thing to remember is the only way to be certain that you are viewing the tip of your cannula is when the glimmering dot disappears when you move the probe 1mm proximally (away). It is frustratingly easy to think that you are viewing your cannula tip when instead you are halfway along the shaft, with the tip out the deep wall of the vessel. Maintain this view via a “walking” approach. For each 1-2mm advancement (step) of the cannula, make an equivalent proximal movement with your ultrasound probe (step). Move the ultrasound away so that you cannot see cannula tip anymore, and then advance the cannula into view. If needed, intermittently stop advancing your cannula and check your tip position as described above. I find advancing at 30-45° until you reach the vessel works well as minimal cannula is wasted on the journey there.

If you find yourself wandering off track, keep the ultrasound focused around the vessel as the centre of your image (as this is your target). Correcting if off centre is slightly counterintuitive. Move your cannulating hand away from the direction that you want to move your cannula tip (ie- moving right will move the tip left). Continue inserting until your cannula tip is sitting at 12 o’clock on top of your vessel. As you reach this point, the tip of the cannula may gently tent the roof of the vessel, turning an “O” shape into a “❤️” shape. This is a good test of correct positioning. Once you’ve reached this point, you’re ready for puncture phase 2!!

 Puncture Phase 2

Puncture 2 is the process of entering the vessel to feeding your cannula fully in. With the tip of your cannula in view and the roof of the vessel tented (❤️), continue incrementally advancing your cannula with tiny movement, walking the ultrasound forward to ensure the tip remains in view (as above). Gently decrease your angle of insertion so that the superficial wall is not tenting towards the deep wall but rather into the potential space of the proximal vessel. Eventually, your tented vessel (❤️) will suddenly encompass the cannula and return to a circular shape (O). This may be associated with a tactile pop. You can check for flashback for additional confirmation of vessel puncture, but I prefer to not take my eyes off the ultrasound screen at this point.

Continue decreasing your angle of insertion to maintain the tip of the cannula in the top 50% of the vessel (keep the sharp bevel away from the deep wall). This may eventually require you be pushing the cannula into the skin, which really requires your assistant to get out of the way. Don’t lose site of your tip! Continue to step forward; cannula then ultrasound. To check whether you are in the vessel and not in soft tissue or dragging on the vessel wall, waggle the tip of the cannula around gently (left, right, up, down). There should be absolutely no distortion of the soft tissue surrounding the vessel; completely free cannula tip movement. I tend to leave the metal stylet in until the plastic catheter is fully inserted to the hub because of greater visibility and added rigidity. This does, however, carry the risk of puncturing the back or sidewall of the vessel if you don’t keep a close eye on your cannula tip. At the very least, ensure 3-4mm of the cannula is inside the vessel lumen prior to gliding the plastic catheter off (to avoid tissuing / tearing the vessel roof). Once this is done, you’ve just successfully place a real-time ultrasound-guided cannula! Well done!

I think it’s reasonable with each healthcare interaction to measure success both in the resolution of issue (beneficence) and in minimization of harm / traumatic experience (non-maleficence). Vascular access is our commonest painful procedure, hence representing a significant potential burden of pain, anxiety, and trauma. Undertaking steps to minimize vascular access attempts, maximize speed/efficiency, and maximize cannula longevity are important considerations in the healthcare interaction. Even if we manage to achieve the elusive goal of a single puncture hospital admission, this still requires a single puncture. 

This discussion is not really directed towards addressing the specifics of analgesia and sedation but suffice to say that time permitting these should be used and optimized readily. A topical anaesthetic is valuable, although in the case of an ultrasound-guided cannula application by the operator is useful in ensuring good placement. Evidence is increasingly suggesting that topical anaesthetic is appropriate in all ages including neonates.

The power of social stories, rehearsal, music therapy, and just general distraction cannot be undervalued. There is a multitude of approaches to this. 

Unfortunately, it is not an uncommon experience to be in a situation where vascular access is required with a degree of clinical urgency. In this circumstance, oral/intranasal/topical medication may have not had time to work, and a specialist in distraction may not be readily available.

In this circumstance, I have found that playing calm and quiet music more useful than positioning a video in front of a child. Maintaining a minimum of people speaking, and using quiet calm voices is valuable. I have had some success using the ultrasound itself as a distraction modality while telling the child a story of the “doughnut that has lost its hole” (vein and cannula tip respectively) as the tip tracks toward the vessel. A variant is the “star that fell from the sky into the lake” (cannula tip and vein respectively). There are many approaches to pain reduction through distraction.

It is my sincere hope that these tips are of some practical and clinical value in your cannulating endeavours. If it makes a difference for a single child, then surely it’s worth it. Good luck!

Pre-hospital analgesia: Part 1

Cite this article as:
Joe Mooney + Dani Hall. Pre-hospital analgesia: Part 1, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2020. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.26121

You’re on a shift in the Rapid Response Vehicle. The radio crackles to life; a two-year-old has pulled a chest of drawers onto himself. He’s conscious and breathing but his leg is badly injured. Lights and sirens on, you wonder what is going to greet you.

The prehospital challenge

Assessing children in the prehospital environment can be challenging. As a stranger arriving at a child’s house at a time when they’re feeling unwell, hurt, or scared, we can seem frightening. Attending multi-patient scenarios, such as a road traffic collision, where both child and parent are injured poses additional challenges. Separating a child from their parent to attend different adult and paediatric hospitals can be hugely traumatic for the child (and the carer )and although we try to get another adult to the scene to accompany the child to the hospital, this isn’t always possible.

In the prehospital setting, we don’t have the luxury of time. A quick decision needs to be made: is this child sick or not sick?

For many prehospital clinicians, children make up a very small proportion of their workload. Drawing up paediatric-drug doses and administering these medications to a scared child takes training and practice.

All of this can make a clinical assessment of a child difficult. Taking off the high-vis jacket, getting down to the child’s level, making a glove-balloon character and using bubbles can all help a child feel at ease.

The prehospital assessment toolbox

There are some validated tools in our box to help overcome these challenges. The Paediatric Assessment Triangle has been used by prehospital care providers at all levels for many years, allowing clinicians to form a hands-off, quick impression about whether the child is sick or not sick.

The triangle is made up of 3 elements: A, B, and C, a mnemonic familiar to clinicians around the world. But this ABC does not stand for airway, breathing, and circulation but instead translates to Appearance, work of Breathing and Circulation to the skin.

Appearance… Is the child interacting with caregivers and ambulance crew? Are they lethargic? Crying? Consolable? Limp in caregivers arms?

Work of Breathing… Are they using accessory muscles to help move air? Are they tripoding? Nasal Flaring? Are they breathing fast or slow? Can you hear a wheeze or stridor?

Circulation to the skin… Are they pale? Cyanotic? Mottled?

If all three parts of the triangle are normal the child is likely to be stable. If all three parts of the triangle are abnormal the patient is in cardio-respiratory failure.

Assessment of pain in the prehospital environment also poses different challenges to the assessment in the hospital, for the same reasons. We use the same age-appropriate pain scales as our hospital-based colleagues: FLACC, Wong-Baker and analog pain scale. Clinical practice analgesia guidelines help direct medication choice, from simple painkillers such as paracetamol and ibuprofen, to stronger analgesics like opiates and ketamine.

The ideal analgesic

The ideal properties of an analgesic are to provide effective pain relief rapidly, with painless administration. Gaining intravenous access in children can be challenging in the field, traumatic for children, and can delay administration of analgesics. It really can’t be stressed enough how important it is not to traumatise a child with cannulation when a good alternative is available. Intranasal fentanyl has had a huge impact on paediatric pain relief prehospitally. In the UK, diamorphine is sometimes used instead of fentanyl; both are potent intranasal opioids that are rapidly and efficiently absorbed from the nasal cavity, giving significant potential for pain management in children.

Arriving at the house, you can hear a child crying; he’s maintaining his airway and is conscious. You make a snapshot PAT assessment: he’s stable. But his thigh is swollen and it’s clear he’s fractured his femur. His parents have given him paracetamol and ibuprofen. This one’s beyond the call of bubbles, so you put them away and instead draw up 0.02mg of fentanyl and give it intranasally.

The intranasal route

Analgesia can be given orally, rectally, intravenously, intramuscularly, or intranasally. Oral medications are metabolized via the hepatic first-pass pathway, meaning they are absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract and delivered first to the liver by the portal vein before reaching the systemic circulation, resulting in a relatively slow onset of action. Intranasal medications, on the other hand, are absorbed directly into the systemic circulation, completely bypassing hepatic first-pass metabolism, so their bioavailability is higher and their onset of action is much faster. And because the nasal mucosa is highly vascularized, with more blood per cubic centimetre than muscle, brain or liver, with a surface area that’s massively increased by the three turbinates in each nostril (out pouches of bone inside the nostrils that create passageways that to warm and moisten the air that flows in through the nose), it is an ideal surface through which drugs with small molecular weights like fentanyl can be absorbed.

Once absorbed into the nasal blood vessels, drugs drain to the right side of the heart via the superior vena cava, are pumped into the pulmonary circulations, and then back through the left side of the heart to the systemic circulations.

Some intranasal drugs have an even faster mechanism of action. It’s thought that fentanyl, and other drugs with very small particle sizes, can also transfer directly to the brain, via the olfactory and trigeminal nerves. This nerve superhighway means they can bypass the blood-brain barrier, and work even faster at their central receptors in the brain.

The intranasal analgesic cavalry

Fentanyl is a synthetic opioid; diamorphine is a morphine derivative. As fentanyl doesn’t cause histamine release, it results in less cardiorespiratory side effects than other opiates. Both fentanyl and diamorphine can be safely combined with oral morphine, meaning intravenous morphine top-ups are less likely to be required. When they’re given intranasally, their onset is within two to three minutes, with effects lasting up to half an hour. It’s easy to see how they’ve become a perfect choice for prehospital providers.

Ketamine, another analgesic in the prehospital analgesic armory, can also be given intranasally, although is not yet licensed via the intranasal route in children in the UK and Ireland. A few trials have compared intranasal ketamine and fentanyl and there have been some interesting results, posing the question as to whether sub-sedative doses of intranasal ketamine could be used as an alternative analgesic for children with limb trauma.

Published in Annals of Emergency Medicine in 2014, the double-blinded RCT, PICHFORK (Pain In Children Fentanyl OR Ketamine), was run in two large Australian paediatric EDs.  Children aged 3 to 13 years old with moderate to severe pain secondary to an isolated limb fracture were randomized in a double-blinded fashion to receive either 1.5 μg/kg intranasal fentanyl or 1mg/kg intranasal ketamine. 73 children were included in the analyses. Similar reductions in pain scores were seen at 30 and 60 minutes for both drugs. The ketamine group had higher patient satisfaction scores (83% compared to 72% for fentanyl) but more minor adverse events (78% compared to 40% of the fentanyl group). Published in 2017, a similar double-blinded RCT conducted in a level II trauma centre in America compared the two intranasal drugs at the same doses in 82 children aged 4 to 17. Like PICHFORK, their results showed more side effects in the intranasal ketamine group (2.2 times higher), but all were minor, with no respiratory adverse events. Analgesic effects at 20 minutes were similar in both groups. And finally, the PRIME (Pain Reduction With Intranasal Medications for Extremity Injuries) trial, a double-blinded RCT published in JAMA Pediatrics in 2019, showed similar results. 90 children, aged 8 to 17 years, presenting to a level I major trauma centre with limb trauma were randomized to receive either intranasal ketamine or fentanyl. Doses used were higher than those in standard clinical practice guidelines, with intranasal fentanyl dosed at 2μg/kg and intranasal ketamine at 1.5mg/kg. Like the other two trials, pain scores at 30 minutes were similar between both groups, while mild adverse events were found to higher in the ketamine group (with a relative risk of 2.5), although again all were transient.

So, is there a role for intranasal ketamine for children with isolated limb fractures in the prehospital or ED setting? None of these studies were powered to show a superiority of intranasal ketamine over fentanyl, but they do suggest that it’s non-inferior and a potential alternative. Although minor and transient, adverse events were higher in the ketamine groups, so it may not trump fentanyl as a first choice analgesic. But for children in whom an opiate is contraindicated, intranasal ketamine might be an alternative. More data will be needed before intranasal ketamine makes its way onto standard CPGs, but results from these trials are promising, with larger studies on the horizon.

After the intranasal fentanyl, the child settles. You apply traction to his leg, and with your colleagues’ help, you move him into an adult lower limb vacuum splint. This is a handy trick you’ve learned – the leg splint is just the right size to use as a whole body splint in small children, maintaining pelvic and spinal precautions. After moving to the back of the ambulance, he starts crying and is obviously in pain. You give him a second dose of 0.02mg fentanyl and phone medical support and discuss options with a senior clinician and get the go-ahead to give the third dose, en route to the hospital, if needed.

Ambulance control pre-alert the emergency department so they can prepare for an incoming paediatric trauma. The child’s mother sits next to the stretcher, holding his hand while you travel to the hospital. You explain to her what’s happened so far, what will you do if anything changes, and what might happen in the hospital. This calms her down. The child sleeps and that third dose of intranasal fentanyl is not required. As you pull onto the ambulance ramp he wakes. You hand him over to the waiting trauma team in resus; intravenous access is gained, IV morphine is given, and a Thomas Splint applied. After his primary survey is completed, an x-ray is taken, which confirms a femoral fracture.

The prehospital cannula

The question about intravenous access in the field is a tricky one. Inserting an IV line in a 2-year-old, particularly in the back of an ambulance, can be extremely difficult, and securing a cannula while travelling at speed requires the dexterity of a magician. If intranasal medication is working then there may not be the need for an IV line prehospitally. This always has to be balanced with the potential need for fluid resuscitation, or other intravenous drugs. Each case is a judgment call, based on the paediatric assessment triangle assessment and need for intravenous medications. But never forget, if a child’s in pain and the bubbles don’t work, don’t forget the fentanyl.

Selected reference

Reagan L, Chapman AR, Celnik A, et al. Nose and vein, speed and pain: comparing the use of intranasal diamorphine and intravenous morphine in a Scottish paediatric emergency department. Emerg Med J 2013; 30:49–52.

Graudins A, Meek R, Egerton-Warburton D, Oakley E, Seith R. The PICHFORK (Pain in Children Fentanyl or Ketamine) Trial: A Randomized Controlled Trial Comparing Intranasal Ketamine and Fentanyl for the Relief of Moderate to Severe Pain in Children With Limb Injuries. Ann Emerg Med [Internet]. 2015 Mar 1 [cited 2019 Jun 20];65(3):248-254.e1. Available from: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0196064414013638

Watts P, Smith A, Perelman M. Nasal delivery of fentanyl. Drug Deliv Transl Res [Internet]. 2013 Feb 1 [cited 2020 Jun 8];3(1):75–83. Available from: https://doi.org/10.1007/s13346-012-0078-y

Goldman RD. Intranasal drug delivery for children with acute illness. Curr Drug Ther 2006; 1:127–130.

Hadley G, Maconochie I, Jackson A. A survey of intranasal medication use in the paediatric emergency setting in England and Wales. Emerg Med J 2010; 27:553–554.

Mudd S. Intranasal fentanyl for pain management in children: a systematic review of the literature. J Pediatr Health Care 2011; 25:316–322

Finn M, Harris D. Intranasal fentanyl for analgesia in the paediatric emergency department. Emerg Med J 2010; 27:300–301.

Telfer P, Criddle J, Sandell J, et al. Intranasal diamorphine for acute sickle cell pain. Arch Dis Child 2009; 94:979–980

Vascular Access: Amanda Ullman at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Vascular Access: Amanda Ullman at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18669

We were pleased that Amanda Ullman took up our offer to speak at DFTB after the great post she and the Vascular Access Management Service wrote for us on management of paediatric central access devices. This talk comes complete with trigger warnings. We’ve all been in the situation when we have been confronted with doughy armed toddlers and no sign of a vein in site. The parents, and that patient, are relying on you to get it right.


Given the prime directive of physicians of Primum Non Nocere (First Do No Harm) it is worth considering if we should be cannulating the child in the first place. In a study by Holloway et al. (2017) they found that 22% of PIVCs were unused after insertion. With a success rate of around 60% in our well children, we really to sway the odds further in our favour.

But is also worth considering the flipside – cannulation may be less painful than heel prick for blood sampling in neonates. Amanda asks us to consider if you are the right person to put in that cannula. Should you just ‘give it a go anyway’? Have you been up half the night and can barely focus? Have you just missed you last six cannulae and have something to prove?

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story‘ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families.

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

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Selected References

Deitcher SR, Gajjar A, Kun L, Heideman RL. Clinically evident venous thromboembolic events in children with brain tumors. The Journal of pediatrics. 2004 Dec 1;145(6):848-50.

Hollaway W, Broeze C, Borland ML. Prospective observational study of predicted usage of intravenous cannulas inserted in a tertiary paediatric emergency department. Emergency Medicine Australasia. 2017 Dec;29(6):672-7.

Kleidon TM, Cattanach P, Mihala G, Ullman AJ. Implementation of a paediatric peripheral intravenous catheter care bundle: A quality improvement initiative. Journal of paediatrics and child health. 2019 Jan 31.

Stolz LA, Cappa AR, Minckler MR, Stolz U, Wyatt RG, Binger CW, Amini R, Adhikari S. Prospective evaluation of the learning curve for ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous catheter placement. The journal of vascular access. 2016 Jul;17(4):366-70.

Takashima M, Schults J, Mihala G, Corley A, Ullman A. Complication and failures of central vascular access device in adult critical care settings. Critical care medicine. 2018 Dec 1;46(12):1998-2009.

Ullman AJ, Cooke M, Kleidon T, Rickard CM. Road map for improvement: point prevalence audit and survey of central venous access devices in paediatric acute care. Journal of paediatrics and child health. 2017 Feb;53(2):123-30.

The 13th Bubble Wrap

Cite this article as:
Grace Leo. The 13th Bubble Wrap, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.14296

With millions upon millions of journal articles being published every year it is impossible to keep up.  Every month we ask some of our friends from PERUKI (Paediatric Emergency Research in UK and Ireland) to point out something that has caught their eye.

Unless you have triskadekaphobia then here is this months round up…