A better discharge summary

Cite this article as:
Beckie Singer. A better discharge summary, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2020. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.21995

Discharge summaries, often considered the bane of every junior doctor and ED physician’s existence. But what if we took a step back and considered these as a clinical handover to primary care – similar in nature to the clinical handover that occurs in the transfer of care documents that you would send with a patient you are transferring to another hospital? They suddenly take on a whole other level of importance. Studies from the ‘adult medicine world‘ have shown that roughly 20% of patients experience an adverse event during the hospital-to-home transition, many of which could be mitigated by good handover between the hospital and the primary care provider.

Neonatal jaundice – the basics

Cite this article as:
Shalome Kanagaratnam. Neonatal jaundice – the basics, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.17047

Most newborns are jaundiced. Indeed, 60% of term infants, 80% of premies and 33% of breastfed babies are jaundiced in early life. Fortunately, the majority of these self-resolve and have no sinister underlying cause. But how do we identify those who require urgent management? How can we effectively and confidently reassure anxious patients whilst ensuring we don’t miss a significant diagnosis?

How to draw a Genogram

Cite this article as:
Daniel Bakhsh. How to draw a Genogram, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.17132

As a Student Doctor at the University of Queensland, I was offered the opportunity to shadow the Adolescent Team at The Child and Youth Mental Health Service (or CYMHS) at the Queensland Children’s Hospital. This was an amazing opportunity to observe some really important work in two of my special interest areas: Paediatrics and Psychiatry. The attachment really drove home that patients don’t exist in isolation, and how this is particularly true for children. The surrounding family system strongly dictates how well they will fare once they leave the hospital.

As part of this attachment I was asked to prepare and present Genograms for every patient at the weekly Multidisciplinary Team meeting. As I began to interview family members in order to gather the required 3 generations of family history, it became clear to me that a small diagram could represent and quickly convey what would otherwise have taken several pages of text. Genograms provide a wealth of insight at a glance, can help align patients with their most appropriate care, and are relatively easy to draw once you know how. They are a mainstay of Paediatrics for a reason.

When I first came across Genograms as a student, attempting to create one was very confusing and a little overwhelming. There are also surprisingly few reference materials available to aid you along the way. So in order to make this task a little easier for the next student, I put together this little video. I hope you find it useful.

– Daniel Bakhsh, Student Doctor, Doctor of Medicine Program, University of Queensland