WILTW: the new world of paediatric services

COVID has brought with it a reduced flow in paediatrics for now. And many paediatricians are feeling guilt or worry about not being able to contribute in the way our Adult colleagues are currently. Damian explores this, and also how we deal with those who do present to ED during the pandemic.

Don't Forget the Bubbles
Don't Forget the Bubbles
WILTW: the new world of paediatric services
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Wilderness Myths: Justin Hensley at DFTB19

Justin Hensley – the man with one of the best-kept beards in medicine – was exceedingly kind and filled in at the eleventh hour when one of the speakers had to pull out. Accompanied on stage by the youngest PICU fellow at the conference – his son, Jack – he busted some wilderness myths for the adventurous in the audience.

Don't Forget the Bubbles
Don't Forget the Bubbles
Wilderness Myths: Justin Hensley at DFTB19
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WILTW: Damian Roland on Covid

Damian brings back WILTW, this time as a podcast. Hear his first thoughts on Covid…

Don't Forget the Bubbles
Don't Forget the Bubbles
WILTW: Damian Roland on Covid
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Prepare for transport: Costas Kanaris at DFTB19

Costas Kanaris is a paediatric intensivist working in Manchester. He is also internet-famous for his challenging #fridayquiz in which he presents a case, drip-feeding information, as the Twitter audience figure out the diagnosis and the best way to treat the patient in front of them.

Don't Forget the Bubbles
Don't Forget the Bubbles
Prepare for transport: Costas Kanaris at DFTB19
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The DFTB Podcast – World Down Syndrome Day

To mark the 21st of March as World Down Syndrome Day we spoke to Dr Elizabeth Herrieven, an EM/PEM Consultant based in Hull about her top tips for triaging and treating children with Down syndrome through her experiences both as a professional and as a parent.

 

Don't Forget the Bubbles
Don't Forget the Bubbles
The DFTB Podcast - World Down Syndrome Day
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Communicating with children with additional needs: Liz Herrieven at DFTB19

Communication is vitally important in so much we do as clinicians.  Without good communication we can’t hope to get a decent history, properly examine our patient, explain what we think is going on or ensure appropriate management.

People with learning disabilities, autism and other additional needs often have difficulties with communication.  Adults and children (from 4 years old) with learning disabilities are three times more likely to die from something which should be amenable to treatment, compared to those without a learning disability. Of course there are many reasons for this, including comorbidities, recognition of illness, access to healthcare and so on, but communication challenges have a huge role to play.  It’s not just a challenge for the patient though, but also a challenge which we, as clinicians, must do our best to overcome.  We think nothing of getting an interpreter to help us communicate with people who speak a different language to us.  Shouldn’t we be thinking about communication with people with additional needs in the same way?

Don't Forget the Bubbles
Don't Forget the Bubbles
Communicating with children with additional needs: Liz Herrieven at DFTB19
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