HIGHLIGHTS

In our second episode of ‘The Three Muskapeers’ Drs Damian Roland, Alasdair Munro and Ian Lewins have a chat about what’s new in the literature about COVID-19, including current challenges and controversies in Paediatrics. Contains scenes of rib-tickling.

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Justin Hensley – the man with one of the best-kept beards in medicine – was exceedingly kind and filled in at the eleventh hour when one of the speakers had to pull out. Accompanied on stage by the youngest PICU fellow at the conference – his son, Jack – he busted some wilderness myths for the adventurous in the audience.

Damian brings back WILTW, this time as a podcast. Hear his first thoughts on Covid…

Costas Kanaris is a paediatric intensivist working in Manchester. He is also internet-famous for his challenging #fridayquiz in which he presents a case, drip-feeding information, as the Twitter audience figure out the diagnosis and the best way to treat the patient in front of them.

To mark the 21st of March as World Down Syndrome Day we spoke to Dr Elizabeth Herrieven, an EM/PEM Consultant based in Hull about her top tips for triaging and treating children with Down syndrome through her experiences both as a professional and as a parent.

 

Communication is vitally important in so much we do as clinicians.  Without good communication we can’t hope to get a decent history, properly examine our patient, explain what we think is going on or ensure appropriate management.

People with learning disabilities, autism and other additional needs often have difficulties with communication.  Adults and children (from 4 years old) with learning disabilities are three times more likely to die from something which should be amenable to treatment, compared to those without a learning disability. Of course there are many reasons for this, including comorbidities, recognition of illness, access to healthcare and so on, but communication challenges have a huge role to play.  It’s not just a challenge for the patient though, but also a challenge which we, as clinicians, must do our best to overcome.  We think nothing of getting an interpreter to help us communicate with people who speak a different language to us.  Shouldn’t we be thinking about communication with people with additional needs in the same way?

Camilla Kingdon is the Vice President for Education and Development at the Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health. Her day job is working as a neonatologist at Evelina London Children’s Hospital.

Whilst the core work of a neonatologist takes place behind closed doors in the safety and security of the NICU babies do not choose where or when they are born. Sometimes, just sometimes, they like to surprise us and pop out early, when we least expect it. What do we do then?

In this special podcast edition we talk to Paediatric Infectious Diseases clinical research fellow Dr Alasdair Munro about what we know so far about COVID-19 and children. This podcast is correct at time of recording and focuses on experiences so far in the UK and what we know globally.

This talk is based on the blog Alasdair wrote along with Dr Alison Boast for ‘Don’t Forget The Bubbles’ which can be found here:

https://bit.ly/2vibXee

Adam is a respiratory physician at Sydney Children’s Hospital. He spoke about all things wheezy in Melbourne for DFTB18.  In this talk from our London conference, he deals with that bane of parents’ lives – the coughing child.

Antibiotics. I’m sure we’ve all been guilty of giving a child in our department a course of antibiotics “just in case”. After all, what harm can it do? In this week’s podcast we talk to Dr Alasdair Munro, a Clinical Research Fellow in Paediatric Infectious Diseases about this and much more as we go antibiotic myth busting!!

Paul Reavley works as a consultant at the Bristol Royal Infirmary.  In this talk he uses his experience in the armed forces to talk about blast injuries. According to Save the Children, one in five children worldwide is living in a conflict zone.