The DFTB Podcast: You Got This

Wellness programmes are very in vogue at the moment but how do you go about setting up one from scratch in your own Emergency Department and do they *really* make a difference? We asked these questions, and more, of Dr Dan Magnus, PEM Consultant in Bristol and found out about the ‘You Got This’ programme he is involved in.

The high yield examination in sepsis: Alan Grayson at DFTB19

One of the challenges of paediatrics is how to distill a life of experience down to something more tangible. When you are asked “How did you know s/he was sick?” you need to be able to give a better answer than “I just know”. In this session from DFTB19  we challenged three clinicians to explain just why they think the way they do.

In this final session that was designed to challenge up and coming paediatricians to be a little better Dr Alan Grayson brought up the boogie-monster in the paediatric emergency department – sepsis.

The high yield respiratory examination: David Krieser at DFTB19

One of the challenges of paediatrics is how to distill a life of experience down to something more tangible. When you are asked “How did you know s/he was sick?” you need to be able to give a better answer than “I just know”. In this session from DFTB19  we challenged three clinicians to explain just why they think the way they do.  

The DFTB Podcast: Rheumatic Fever

Rheumatic Fever is one of those conditions that all good paediatric trainees diligently learn about and then promptly never see for 10 years. Unless of course you happen to live and work in the Northern Territory of Australia. In this episode of the podcast we talk to Dr Claire Chandler, a paediatric registrar in Alice Springs, about the clinical features and management of Rheumatic Fever and why, in her practice and population, she sees at least a couple of cases of the condition every week.

The high yield dehydration assessment: Nikki Abela at DFTB19

One of the challenges of paediatrics is how to distill a life of experience down to something more tangible. When you are asked “How did you know s/he was sick?” you need to be able to give a better answer than “I just know“. In this session from DFTB19  we challenged three clinicians to explain just why they think the way they do.

Nikki Abela challenges the assumption that we are great at assessing hydration status in children. We could all do better. We are right between 25% and 80% of the time. That huge spread of exactitude does not just encompass the experience of years.

Petechiae in Children: Tom Waterfield at DFTB19

Perhaps it was the story of Ezra and his mum, Sorina, who Tom had treated as a PICU registrar that fuelled his interest in research? But what he recognized, when he went to work in the ED, is that despite having seen the worst possible outcome s is that not all children with a petechial illness have meningo-coccaemia.  Our current practice guidelines are based on data from a time before vaccination.