Medical Parents of Australia and New Zealand Conference – 2018

Cite this article as:
Jasmine Antoine. Medical Parents of Australia and New Zealand Conference – 2018, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.15231

The Medical Parents of Australia and New Zealand conference returned for round two over the weekend 3rd & 4th March, holding their event in Melbourne. MPANZ began as an idea on social media and has now expanded to a three-day event including workshops on resuscitation and career development.

Two new wellness resources

Cite this article as:
Tessa Davis. Two new wellness resources, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.14888

Wellness and wellbeing are current hot topics. Yes, we know that systems need to be changed, and we are all working hard every day to bring about change. But in the meantime, as junior doctors, we still need to go to work every day.

The reality of dealing with life and death situations, the responsibility of decision-making, the shift work and lack of sleep, the inevitable errors, the time away from our families, can all lead to increased stress, anxiety, burnout, and depression.

It’s not a case of telling junior doctors that they have to toughen up, it’s about supporting ourselves to manage our work-life balance as well. That’s our individual responsibility.

And that’s why I was so pleased to see two fabulous, and different, resources launched this week.

First off the starting block was Australia, with WRapEM.org. WRaPEM was built by a team of Queensland-based Emergency Physicians with an interest in wellbeing.

WRapEM has a set of ten modules which are fully designed and collated so that you could run them in your department next week. Modules topics include communication, performance optimisation, reflection, and self-care. Each module has a comprehensive lesson plan consisting of pre-reading material, a guide for facilitators, a guide for learners, and some have slides already prepared, and quizzes for the end of the session. The modules allow user participation and can be adapted depending on how you would like to use them.

Example of the facilitator guide from the Communication Module

Next is You Got This, by a UK team of EM healthcare professionals in Bristol Children’s Emergency Department. This is a wellness website and blog specific to those working in Emergency Departments, which also contains links to a range of organisations that can offer support and advice when we need it. It has a promising wellness blog with some great posts to get their library started. And it has a department-specific wellness section which includes bespoke elements focused on support; activities (like an annual Wellness Week); innovations (things like positive incident reporting); resources (to share with your staff what the local wellbeing support is, social events in the department, wellbeing projects).

 

 

Both of these resources are excellent and they have something different to offer. Here at DFTB, we cannot wait to watch them grow and develop over the coming months, and I look forward to using them in my own department.

Beads of Courage

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Thom O'Neill. Beads of Courage, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2018. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.14526

You know that feeling when something is completely and utterly good? Where there are no catches, no downsides; just pure unfiltered goodness. When you discover something that you believe couldn’t possibly get any better? Beads Of Courage – a simple yet beautiful programme to mark a child’s journey through illness – rouses that exact feeling.

Diana Egerton-Warbuton: Reducing alcohol related harm in adolescents at DFTB17

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Diana Egerton-Warbuton: Reducing alcohol related harm in adolescents at DFTB17, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2017. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.13984

This talk was recorded live on the opening plenary session of day two at DFTB17 in Brisbane.

The Quagmire

Cite this article as:
Natalie Thurtle. The Quagmire, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2017. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.13504

Our community is made up of health care folks that do hard things, go the extra mile, work on themselves and their knowledge so that patients get better outcomes. We’re not good all the time. We make mistakes, forget stuff, get grumpy or emotional, slide into tribal behaviour. But we’re working on it. So when someone comes along and shines a light on what’s happening outside our normal frame of practice, shows us patients that can’t get care, who are needlessly dying or suffering, it makes us uncomfortable. We want to do something.

Sometimes I get asked to be the person that turns on that torch, the person that makes everyone else uncomfortable, most recently at the excellent DFTB17. I try to do this with balance, to show another context, but also not to make people feel helpless or shocked. Sometimes I get it right, sometimes not. Without fail though, at least one person always asks me afterwards a variation of ‘What can I do?

Keeping little folk safe

Cite this article as:
Kristin Boyle. Keeping little folk safe, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2017. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.13844

If my house were a workplace, it would be an emergency department. We operate 24-7, there are frequent tears and sometimes blood, and always a little too much to do in the allocated time. We have also recently experienced a surge in workload, which has arrived in the form of a soft cheeked, downy haired, sweet smelling, all around delightful baby boy. We jokingly refer to him as The Royal Baby, for he is indeed a teeny dictator, but a benevolent one who bestows smiles generously upon his subjects, and is happy to converse with one and all, albeit with a limited vocabulary.