An approach to irritability and pain in the severely neurologically impaired child.

Cite this article as:
Henry Goldstein. An approach to irritability and pain in the severely neurologically impaired child., Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18178

Logan is a 6yo who is presented to ED by his mother, one Tuesday evening as “just not himself“. Logan is well known to your local paediatric team for management of his GMFCS 5 spastic quadriplegic cerebral palsy. He has a long list of comorbidities, frequent hospital attendance and multiple unplanned admissions for, variously, aspiration pneumonia, seizures or irritability ?cause.

Bubble Wrap PLUS – April 2019

Cite this article as:
Anke Raaijmakers. Bubble Wrap PLUS – April 2019, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18568

Welcome to April’s Bubble Wrap Plus, our monthly paediatric journal club provided by Professor Jaan Toelen & his team of the University Hospitals in Leuven (Belgium). This comprehensive list of ‘articles to read’ comes from 34 journals, including Pediatrics, The Journal of Pediatrics, Archives of Disease in Childhood, JAMA Pediatrics, Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health, NEJM, and many more.

This month’s list features answers to intriguing questions (and maybe answers) such as: ‘Do pediatricians follow guidelines when managing status epilepticus in children?’, ‘Does antibiotic prophylaxis for UTI lead to fewer non-UTI infections?’, ‘Is intranasal fentanyl safe for procedural pain management in neonates?’ and ‘Does the early or late introduction of allergens change the development of atopic disease?’.

You will find the list broken down into four sections:

1.Reviews and opinion articles

Helicobacter pylori Infection.

Crowe SE. N Engl J Med. 2019 Mar 21;380(12):1158-1165.

Evaluation of the child with global developmental delay and intellectual disability.

Bélanger SA, et al. Paediatr Child Health. 2018 Sep;23(6):403-419.

Closing the Disclosure Gap: Medical Errors in Pediatrics.

Lin M, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Mar 13.

Why, when, and how to give surfactant.

Jobe AH. Pediatr Res. 2019 Mar 12.

The pathogenesis and management of renal scarring in children with vesicoureteric reflux and pyelonephritis.

Murugapoopathy V, et al. Pediatr Nephrol. 2019 Mar 7.

Communication with children and adolescents about the diagnosis of a life-threatening condition in their parent.

Dalton L, et al. Lancet. 2019 Mar 16;393(10176):1164-1176.

Communication with children and adolescents about the diagnosis of their own life-threatening condition.

Stein A, et al. Lancet. 2019 Mar 16;393(10176):1150-1163.

Paediatric sarcoidosis.

Nathan N, et al.Paediatr Respir Rev. 2019 Feb;29:53-59.

Human milk as “chrononutrition”: implications for child health and development.

Hahn-Holbrook J, et al.Pediatr Res. 2019 Mar 11. 

2. Original clinical studies

Association Between Year of Birth and 1-Year Survival Among Extremely Preterm Infants in Sweden During 2004-2007 and 2014-2016.

Norman M, et al. JAMA. 2019 Mar 26;321(12):1188-1199.

Management of status epilepticus in children prior to medical retrieval: Deviations from the guidelines.

Uppal P, et al. J Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Mar 28.

What Do NICU Fellows Identify as Important for Achieving Competency in Neonatal Intubation?

Brady J, et al.Neonatology. 2019 Mar 19;116(1):10-16.

Achieving Procedural Competency during Neonatal Fellowship Training: Can Trainees Teach Us How to Teach?

Marrs LK, et al.Neonatology. 2019 Mar 19;116(1):17-19.

Impact of Trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole Urinary Tract Infection Prophylaxis on Non-UTI Infections.

Desai S, et al.Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 Apr;38(4):396-397.

Sleep Problems in Children With Autism and Other Developmental Disabilities: A Brief Report.

Valicenti-McDermott M, et al.J Child Neurol. 2019 Mar 17:883073819836541.

A Validated Scale for Assessing the Severity of Acute Infectious Mononucleosis.

Katz BZ, et al.J Pediatr. 2019 Mar 7.

Effect of Sustained Inflations vs Intermittent Positive Pressure Ventilation on Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia or Death Among Extremely Preterm Infants: The SAIL Randomized Clinical Trial.

Kirpalani H, et al. JAMA. 2019 Mar 26;321(12):1165-1175.

High-Dose Vitamin D Supplementation During Pregnancy and Asthma in Offspring at the Age of 6 Years.

Brustad N, et al. JAMA. 2019 Mar 12;321(10):1003-1005.

High-Dose Vitamin D Supplementation Does Not Prevent Allergic Sensitization of Infants.

Rosendahl J, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Mar 19. pii: S0022-3476(19)30245-8.

Timing of introduction of allergenic solids for infants at high risk.

Abrams EM, et al. Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Feb;24(1):56-57.

The Effects of Early Nutritional Interventions on the Development of Atopic Disease in Infants and Children: The Role of Maternal Dietary Restriction, Breastfeeding, Hydrolyzed Formulas, and Timing of Introduction of Allergenic Complementary Foods.

Greer FR, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Mar 18. pii: e20190281.

Efficacy of primary treatment with immunoglobulin plus ciclosporin for prevention of coronary artery abnormalities in patients with Kawasaki disease predicted to be at increased risk of non-response to intravenous immunoglobulin (KAICA): a randomised controlled, open-label, blinded-endpoints, phase 3 trial.

Hamada H, et al. Lancet. 2019 Mar 16;393(10176):1128-1137.

Pediatric Celiac Disease and Eosinophilic Esophagitis: Outcome of Dietary Therapy.

Patton T, et al. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2019 Mar 26.

Host and Bacterial Markers that Differ in Children with Cystitis and Pyelonephritis.

Shaikh N, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Mar 21. pii: S0022-3476(19)30027-7.

Montelukast and Neuropsychiatric Events in Children with Asthma: A Nested Case-Control Study.

Glockler-Lauf SD, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Mar 21. pii: S0022-3476(19)30198-2.

Physical Fitness, Physical Activity, and the Executive Function in Children with Overweight and Obesity.

Mora-Gonzalez J, et al. J Pediatr. 2019 Mar 19. pii: S0022-3476(18)31745-1.

Does discharging clinically well patients after one hour of treatment impact emergency department length of stay for asthma patients.

Lenko D, et al. J Paediatr Child Health. 2019 Mar 20.

Characterization of Esophageal Motility in Infants with Congenital Diaphragmatic Hernia using High Resolution Manometry.

Rayyan M, et al. J Pediatr Gastroenterol Nutr. 2019 Mar 5.

Effect of metronome guidance on infant cardiopulmonary resuscitation.

Kim CW, et al. Eur J Pediatr. 2019 Mar 8.

Expressions of Gratitude and Medical Team Performance.

Riskin A, Bamberger P, et al. Pediatrics. 2019 Mar 7.

A cohort study of intranasal fentanyl for procedural pain management in neonates.

McNair C, et al. Paediatr Child Health. 2018 Dec;23(8):e170-e175.

Traumatic brain injury in young children with isolated scalp haematoma.

Bressan S, et al. Arch Dis Child. 2019 Mar 4.

Association of Atopic Dermatitis With Sleep Quality in Children.

Ramirez FD, et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2019 Mar 4:e190025.

3. Guidelines and best evidence

Prevention of Drowning.

Denny SA, et al.Pediatrics. 2019 Mar 15.

Lack of Sleep and Sports Injuries in Adolescents: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

Gao B, et al. J Pediatr Orthop. 2018 Nov 28.

Guidelines for vitamin K prophylaxis in newborns.

Ng E, et al. Paediatr Child Health. 2018 Sep;23(6):394-402.

School, child care and camp exclusion policies for chickenpox: A rational approach.

Bridger NA. Paediatr Child Health. 2018 Sep;23(6):420-427.

4. Case reports

An 11-Month-Old Male With Acute-Onset Left-Sided Facial Paralysis.

Posa M, et al.Clin Pediatr (Phila). 2019 Mar 22:9922819837354.

A Lower-limb Skin Lesion in a 10-year-old Girl.

Koirala A, et al. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2019 Apr;38(4):e79.

Exercise-Induced Purpura in Children.

Paul SS, et al.Pediatrics. 2019 Apr;143(4).

 

If we have missed out on something useful or you think other articles are absolutely worth sharing, please add them in the comments!

Please join us for our next #DFTB_JC on twitter…The DFTB/ADC Journal Club is a monthly collaboration between @DFTBubbles and @ADC_BMJ featuring a FREE access article from the latest issues of Archives of Disease of Childhood.

Married to the Mob: Clare Dimer at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Married to the Mob: Clare Dimer at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18327

Clare Dimer is a senior social worker in WA’s Department of Health. In this talk she talks of the challenges faced by indigenous Australians today.

At the beginning of the 18th century there were over 250 languages spoken in Australia. By the start of this century only 150 are in daily use.  Language and culture pay a huge part in healthcare and an understanding of this should helps inform how we – as doctors, nurses, social workers – can help our indigenous patients.

 

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story’ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families. Tickets for DFTB19, which will be held in London, UK, are now on sale from www.dftb19.com.

 

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

 

iTunes Button

 

Braithwaite J, Hibbert PD, Jaffe A, White L, Cowell CT, Harris MF, Runciman WB, Hallahan AR, Wheaton G, Williams HM, Murphy E. Quality of health care for children in Australia, 2012-2013. Jama. 2018 Mar 20;319(11):1113-24.

McGlynn EA, Asch SM, Adams J, Keesey J, Hicks J, DeCristofaro A, Kerr EA. The quality of health care delivered to adults in the United States. New England journal of medicine. 2003 Jun 26;348(26):2635-45.

Nolan T, Resar R, Haraden C, Griffin F, Gordon A. Improving the Reliability of Health Care. Institute for Healthcare Improvement 2004.

O’Brien M. Leading Reliability Improvement for Safer Healthcare. The Cognitive Institute, 2015.

 

Top 5 Papers in PEM

Cite this article as:
Tessa Davis. Top 5 Papers in PEM, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18476

This post is based on a talk I presented at the RCEM Spring Conference in April 2019 – Top 5 papers in PEM.

Kylie and Jason are enjoying their time at home with their first baby. The highs of being new parents is at its peak and true sleep deprivation is yet to set in. Jayden is two weeks old and is simply perfect. They spend hours staring at him each day marvelling at the perfect human they have created. 

As we follow Jayden through his journey to adulthood, we’ll encounter some common paediatric problems. The 5.5 papers I have chosen were selected because: they cover common presentations; they use large patients groups; and they were conducted by well-respected and highly regarded research groups. But back to our story…

 One night Jayden seems a bit more unsettled than normal. When they check his temperature it’s 38.4. They get in the car and bring Jayden to ED

 Febrile neonates are a huge source of concern – we know that they can deteriorate quickly and we usually err on the side of caution by doing a full septic screen, IV antibiotics, and admission. Actually many of these babies don’t have a serious bacterial infection. Is there a way to tell which ones do?

When you see Jayden in your ED, you ask yourself is…should I do a full septic screen?

Paper 1 - Kupperman et al, 2019, A clinical prediction rule to identify febrile infants 60 days and younger at low risk for serious bacterial infections, JAMA Pediatrics

This paper aimed to derive and validate a highly accurate prediction rule to identify infant at low risk of SBI. The patients were febrile infants 60 days and younger (who had a rectal temp of >38 in the ED or a fever at home within the preceding 24 hours)

They excluded those who were critically ill, who had antibiotics in the preceding 48 hours, those born premature, and those with other medical conditions.

There were 1821 febrile infants included.

The authors considered clinical suspicion of SBI. They then look at various markers: blood culture; urine culture and urinalysis; CSF; FBC; and procalcitonin levels. The outcomes  considered were serious bacterial infection – that is bacterial meningitis, bacteraemia, or urinary tract infection.

Overall, the rates of SBI in this group was 9%. The authors formulated a rule with a very high sensitivity (97.7%) for identifying those at low risk of serious bacterial infection. They were low risk if they fulfilled three criteria:

  • negative urinalysis
  • neutrophil count of less than 4/mm3 
  • procalcitonin of less than 0.5ng/ml

61.3% of their patient group were low risk.

Interestingly their low risk rule does not include use of  lumbar puncture67.4% of the low risk group had a lumbar puncture that would not have been necessary.

Key take away: There may be some febrile neonates that are low risk, and therefore we could avoid a lumbar puncture and full work up. In practical terms, this is unlikely to change our practice at the moment. Many of us cannot send a procalcitonin in the ED, and we might have to wait several hours to get a neutrophil count back. However this does bode well for the future in identifying which of these well febrile neonates are low risk.

Jayden does get a full septic screen. He has IV antibiotics for 48 hours and remains well. His blood cultures are negative so his antibiotics are stopped and he is discharged.

FLASH FORWARD…

 

 

Jayden is growing well. At 7 months of age, he is looking great and developmentally normal. Dad, Jason, smokes, but reassures you that he never does so in the house. Jayden develops a cough and two days later starts breathing very quickly and noisily. They head to the emergency department.

Jayden has bronchiolitis. This is very common and your departments and wards have no doubt been filled with these children over the winter. We know that little works with these children. So you force yourself to hold back the ‘trial of salbutamol’ because it won’t make any difference.. But high flow does seem to be the one thing (along with oxygen) that might make a difference.

You ask yourself the question...should I start high flow?

Paper 2 - Franklin et al, A Randomized Trial of High-Flow Oxygen Therapy in Infants with Bronchiolitis. NEJM. 2018. 378(12):1121-1131

This study looks at infants under 12 months old with a clinical diagnosis of bronchiolitis and a need for supplemental oxygen. 1472 were included (after exclusions). Patients were excluded if: they had an alternative diagnosis; they had cyanotic heart disease; or they were on home oxygen.

Patients were randomised to either high flow or low flow. The high flow group were given heated humidified high flow oxygen – 2L/kg/min via Optiflow. The oxygen was then weaned to achieve target saturations, and they were taken off high flow once they had been on air for four hours. The low flow group were given wall oxygen via nasal cannulae at 2L/min max.

The outcome  was escalation of care. This meant who in the low flow group was escalated to high flow, and who in the high flow group was escalated to BiPAP or was intubated. Treatment failure was based on: an increase in heart rate; if the respiratory rate increased or didn’t drop; if they were needing oxygen in >2L/min of flow or >0.4 FiO2 to maintain their saturations; or if they achieve a high early warning score. Clinicians could also escalate care themselves (34% were escalated in this way).

Escalation of care occurred much more commonly in the low flow group – with 12% being escalated in the high flow group and 23% in the low flow group.

 

Interestingly there was no difference in the length of stay between the two groups.

Key take away: High flow does reduce the need for escalation. Escalation itself is significant – it requires increased nursing attention for low flow patients while they are transferred onto Optiflow.  There may be less medical staffing on the wards if the child deteriorates on high flow overnight. Although they aren’t comparing like with like, escalation itself is an important clinical event. They also demonstrated that high flow does not increase the number of adverse events (for example there was no difference in the number of pneumothoraces between the groups). High flow is safe to use and we should consider starting it early in ED.

You start Jayden on high flow in ED and he stabilises. 12 hours later he is weaned off on the ward and is discharged the following day.

FLASH FORWARD…

Jayden is now a healthy 3 year old boy. He loves Paw Patrol.  He hates vegetables and won’t eat any food that is the colour green or yellow. Kylie and Jason are expecting their next child, and Jason has finally quit smoking. Unfortunately Jayden is prone to wheezy episodes and now has his very own inhaler which he hates using. The change in weather in London, from quite cold to…colder, seems to have triggered something and he’s now pretty wheezy and short of breath. They head into their favourite emergency department.

 Jayden is now firmly in the realm of viral-induced wheeze. Yes, it’s all on a spectrum, but he’s now 3 years old with an inhaler. You asses him and think he should have a salbutamol burst.

As you are writing the salbutamol up, your SHO asks  you – should I give him steroids?

Paper 3 - Foster SJ, Cooper MN, Oosterhof S, Borland ML. Oral prednisolone in preschool children with virus-associated wheeze: a prospective, randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. The Lancet Respiratory Medicine. 2018 Jan 17.

 This paper aimed to assess the efficacy of oral prednisolone in children presenting to an ED with viral wheeze.

The patients included were 2-6 years old. They were excluded if: saturations were less than 92% in air; they had a silent chest; they had sepsis; there was a previous PICU admission for wheeze; they had prematurity; or they had recently had steroids.

605 patients were included and they were randomised to receive either prednisolone or placebo. The prednisolone group received 1mg/kg prednisolone once a day for three days. The placebo group received a placebo medication (matched for volume and taste to prednisolone) once a day for three days.

Patients were assessed for their wheeze severity using a validated pulmonary score.

The outcome measures were length of stay (until clinically fit for discharge). They also considered re-attendance, readmission, salbutamol usage, and residual symptoms.

The results are tricky to interpret. Those who were discharged from ED within four hours did not benefit from prednisolone. However there may be some benefit in the mild to moderate wheeze group, and some in those who used salbutamol at home prior to presenting to ED. Interestingly this paper did not support our previously held belief that those children with atopy respond better to prednisolone.

 Key take homes: Some pre-schoolers are steroid responsive, but identifying which ones is a challenge. As Damian Roland discusses here, it is likely that we are seeing lots of children presenting with the same symptoms (wheeze) but with different pathology behind it. Once we can identify the pathology we can start to target specific groups of patients with management that works.

You decided not to give Jayden prednisolone and after his salbutamol burst he stretches to 4 hours and is discharged home.

FLASH FORWARD…

Jayden is 5 years old and in his excitement of building the new Hogwarts Lego castle he accidentally swallows a Lego head. Kylie and Jason aren’t sure whether to worry or not? So they take him into ED.

Children ingesting random objects is a common presentation to ED.

When you see Jayden in the department, his parents ask you…should I search through his poo?

Paper 3.5 - Tagg, A. , Roland, D. , Leo, G. S.Y., Knight, K. , Goldstein, H. , Davis, T. , DFTB, (2018), Everything is awesome: Don’t forget the Lego. J Paediatr Child Health. doi:10.1111/jpc.14309

Myself and 5 of my fearless, and brave, paediatric colleagues swallowed a Lego head each to see how quickly it passed. The paper was generously published in the Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health.

To ensure serious scientific rigour, we put together some scoring systems.

The Stool Hardness and Transit time (the SHAT score) took into account how hard our stools were, and whether that impacted (no pun intended) on the time to retrieve the Lego head.

And out main outcome was the Found And Retrieved Time (the FART score). This was the time to get our Lego heads back, and the average FART score was 1.71 days.

Unfortunately one of the six of us didn’t find his Lego head. After valiantly searching through his own faeces for two weeks, he gave up. And it may still be up there.

Key take home: Don’t search through poo, it’s gross.

Jayden heads home happily to finish building his Lego Castle.

FLASH FORWARD.

Jayden is 6 years old. He thinks Paw Patrol is for losers. Fortunately he still loves Lego and Harry Potter. He also enjoys climbing. Unfortunately, two days ago he fell off the ladder coming down from his bunk bed. He seemed okay at the time, and Kylie and Jason had other plans that evening, so they decided to keep him at home. Now, two days later, he has a massive egg on his head and has been complaining of a headache. He also vomited yesterday. They bring him to ED.

 

We have fabulous head injury guidance for kids thanks to PECARN, CHALICE, and CATCH. But actually PECARN and CATCH specifically exclude injuries more than 24 hours old, and CHALICE doesn’t publish data on this group. So, for Jayden you need to put the NICE guideline away because it doesn’t apply. This is a common grey area.

The question you ask is….should I scan his head?

Paper 4 - Borland M, Dalziel SR, Phillips N, Lyttle M, Bressan S, Oakley E, Hearps SJC, Kochar A, Furyk J, Cheek J, Neutze J, Gilhotra Y, Dalton S, Babl F. Delayed Presentations to Emergency Departments of Children With Head Injury: A PREDICT Study, Annals of Emergency Medicine, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.annemergmed.2018.11.035

This paper aimed to establish the prevalence of traumatic brain injuries in children presenting more than 24 hours after the head injury.

Traumatic brain injury (TBI) was defined as: intracranial haemorrhage; contusion; cerebral oedema; diffuse axonal injury; traumatic infarction; shearing injury; or a sigmoid sinus thrombosis.

The also looked a clinically significant traumatic brain injury (cTBI) – this included death, intubation for more than 24 hours, neurosurgery, or admission for 2 or more nights to hospital.

The patients were from the Australian Paediatric Head Injury Study Cohort which was 20,137 patients. 5% of these presented over 24 hours after the injury. 981 children were included in this study.

The authors considered the injury characteristics and demographics, trying to find an association between mechanism and delay in presentation. Those presenting were more likely to have: a non-frontal scalp haematoma; headache; vomiting; and assault with NAI concern. Those with loss of consciousness and amnesia were more likely to have presented within the first 24 hours.

The CT rates were much higher in the late presentation group – 20.6% being scanned in the delayed group and only 7.9% in the early group. This probably reflects the lack of evidence in this area, and therefore we feel safer doing more scans.

But the rates of TBI also varied. 3.8% in the delayed presentation group had a TBI, whereas only 1.2% in the early presentation group did.

The rates cTBI were the same between the groups at 0.8%

Key take homes: There is an increased risk of TBI when presenting more than 24 hours after a head injury injury. The authors found that risk is increased if the patient has a non-frontal scalp haematoma or a suspicion of a depressed skull fracture.

You decide to scan Jayden’s head, but it turns out to be normal and he is discharged home.

FLASH FORWARD… 

Jayden is 8. He’s been drinking a LOT of water over the last few weeks and seems to be weeing constantly. His clothes seem a bit big for him too. He looks so bad one day (and has vomiting and abdominal pain) that Jason finally reneges and takes him into ED.

Jayden has DKA. The debate about over-zealous fluid administrations and its relationship to the dreaded cerebral oedema is long-standing. Previous research suggested a link but only by association, not causality.

You ask yourself…how fast should I give IV fluids?

Paper 5 - Kupperman et al. Clinical Trial of Fluid Infusion Rates for Pediatric Diabetic Ketoacidosis NEJM 2018 vol 378 (24) pp 2275-2287

The study examines the causal effect between fluid resuscitation and cerebral oedema.

They included 1389 episodes of DKA. Exclusions were mainly due to too much management prior to contact with the study team, as well as children with a GCS<12. The median age was 11. It should be noted that the very young and the very sick are probably lost in this cohort.

Patients were randomised to received either fast or slow rehydration, and then were split again into received either 0.9% NaCl or 0.45% NaCl.

The fast rehydration group received 20ml/kg bolus and then replacement of 10% deficit, half over 12 hours and rest over next 24 hours. The slow rehydration group received a 10ml/kg bolus and then replacement of 5% deficit over 48 hours. Maintenance fluids and insulin were given in addition.

The outcomes looked at were deterioration of neurological status within first 24 hours of treatment. They also assessed short term memory during treatment, and IQ 2-6 months after the episode of DKA.

In short, they found no difference between the groups. There was a 0.9% rate of brain injury overall and it didn’t matter which type of fluids or how fast. Patients were more likely to get hyperchloraemic acidosis in the 0.9% NaCl group but this is of debatable clinical significance.

Key take homes: The evidence does not support our traditionally cautious approach to DKA. The speed of IV fluids does not seem to be the cause of brain injury in DKA.

You resuscitate Jayden and send him off to the ward. He is discharged a few days later with good support from the Endocrine team for management of his diabetes.

FLASH FORWARD…

Jayden is now 16 years old and next time he comes to ED, he’ll be in the harsh world of Adult ED. We have navigated him through his common childhood presentations to ED and answered the key questions we ask ourselves every day in the Paeds ED.

 

Should I do a full septic screen on this hot baby?

Should I start high flow on this infant with bronchiolitis?

Should I give prednisolone to this 2 year old with wheeze?

Should I scan this child with a head injury?

How fast should I give fluids to my DKA?

And most importantly, do I ever need to sift through my child’s poo, or my own ever again?

DFTB go to SMACC

Cite this article as:
Andrew Tagg. DFTB go to SMACC, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18334

Without SMACC there would be no Don’t Forget the Bubbles. But little did Tessa and I know that despite being at the same conference it would be another four years before we actually met in person at DFTB17 in Brisbane.

Nobody knew what to expect at that first SMACC as we sat in the dark waiting for the conference to begin.  I had just signed up with Twitter and was just excited to be in the company of people who thought the same as me, who were excited to learn, and were using this new thing called #FOAMed. As I am the shy retiring type I barely said hello to people that now, a lifetime later, I would be proud to call friends. Instead, I just sat in the audience and absorbed all the knowledge and positivity that flooded my way.

Flash forward a few years and those friendships, forged online, have grown as Twitter avatars are replaced with real people. No longer am I as shy to go up to someone I have never met in real life and I’m glad others have taken up the challenge too (Andrew and Sarah,  I am looking at you).

Tessa and I feel very privileged to have played some small part in the success of SMACC as we run the very final SMACCmini paediatric workshop. If you couldn’t come along then here are some of the things you missed.

 

Sweet Child O’ Mine (A neonates journey) – Trish Woods

Trish is no stranger to the DFTB ethos and as a neonatologist stopped to make us reflect on one of our basic assumptions – just who is the patient.  Just because our tiniest patients lie in their cribs, helpless, requiring help with all of their daily cares, does not mean that we should not consider them as people. It might be an alien thought to some – that the patient in front of us hears what we say, and how we say it, but they are not just a disease or a problem to be dealt with or the one in pod 3. They are a person with a name.

Seeing the team through the eyes and ears of the patient, Trish helps us enter the sensory (and often-overstimulating) world of the NICU.

Why not take a look at this paper on some of the ways we can start treating the patient and not the disease.

Roué JM, Kuhn P, Maestro ML, Maastrup RA, Mitanchez D, Westrup B, Sizun J. Eight principles for patient-centred and family-centred care for newborns in the neonatal intensive care unit. Archives of Disease in Childhood-Fetal and Neonatal Edition. 2017 Jul 1;102(4):F364-8.

I Want Candy (neonatal pain relief) – Justin Morgenstern

Justin Morgenstern, one of everyones favourite Canadians, has recently relocated to our side of the world and is practicing in New Zealand. Knowing that he is such a fan of evidence based medicine we set him the task of finding out if sucrose is as good as we think it is as an analgesic in neonates.

Here, for your delectation, is his take on analgesia for kids.

I don’t want to spoil his conclusion but this slide might give you just a little clue…

He started by challenging a fundamental assumption – that we can accurately tell whether a neonate is in pain or not. Or, more accurately, he challenged our assumption that we could tell when a medication worked.  We know the limitations of the traditional Wong-Baker Faces scale in older children and most of us probably use some combination of our clinical gestalt and the FLACC (Face/Legs/Arms/Cry/Consolation) score in neonates. But is it some sort of surrogate marker for distress, rather than pain? If fMRIs show no difference in an infants brain when they receive sucrose does that mean it does nothing for pain?

Of course there are a lot of things we can do that we know do work:-

  • Limit painful procedures
    • If venipuncture is less painful than a heelprick why not use it.
  • Let nurses treat the pain
    • Nurses are amazing (full stop) but they are also so much better at giving analgesia by the clock than any doctor
  • Address the underlying issues
    • Splint the obviously broken arm  before x-ray rather than waiting for them to get some imaging and then feeling guilty about it.
  • Consider non-pharmacological adjuncts
    • Dogs, clowns and bubbles are all powerful distractors.

 

Straight Up (bilious babies) – Camille Wu

Camille Wu last spoke for us at DFTB17 on testicular tribulations so it was a pleasure to welcome her back to join us to talk about surgical causes of bilious vomiting.

Rather than put words in a parents mouth she suggested asking exactly what colour was the vomit. If they answer Pantone 2565C then you are in trouble. Green vomit suggests a higher up obstruction that might require surgical intervention and certainly requires surgical assessment. Likewise rather than asking if the vomit was projectile, it is better to ask “How far did it go?

Whilst it is important to remember that there are a number of significant medical causes of bilious vomit (such as sepsis and CPAP belly) we really need to be concerned about surgical causes. Camille broke these down into mechanical causes and functional causes.

Mechanical causes

Intrinsic

  • Duodenal atresia
  • Small bowel atresia
  • Ano-rectal malformation

Extrinsic

  • Malrotation/volvulus
  • Congenital bands
  • Intestinal duplication

Functional causes

  • Hirschsprung disease
  • Meconium ileus/plug
  • Necrotising enterocolitis

The more proximal the obstruction the less bubbles of gas you will see on initial imaging. Camille reminded us that early imaging and intervention can make all the difference. If in doubt, pick up the phone, no matter the time of day or night.

The Safety Dance – Linda Durojaiye

Linda Durojaiye is a staff specialist at Sydney’s Children’s Hospital at Randwick. In her talk on leadership and patient safety she owned up to mistakes that have been made and shared some lessons from her department on how they have created a safer environment where everyone is accountable. Given that we have no control over who comes in we need to take ownership of what happens to them once they pass through our doors.

Linda and her team created a culture of safety – starting with regular team huddles to identify potential threats to safety. Using a strong leadership team they created a model of care that engaged both medical and nursing staff as well as the patient/parent consumer. She highlighted the resources freely available on the Institute for Healthcare Improvement website.

If you want to know more about the Clinical Emergency Response System then you can find it here.

 

One Vision (VR in paediatrics procedures) – Andy Weatherall

If your idea of virtual reality is still stuck in the last century and The Lawnmower Man (a poor 34% on Rotten Tomatoes) then you might not be aware of some of the advances that are putting the technology in the hands of normal people. Andrew Weatherall is the co-chair of paediatric anaesthesia at the Children’s Hospital at Westmead and has been looking at the role virtual reality may play as an adjunct to standard anaesthesia techniques.

He has written about his experiences here. Whether as a means to reduce anxiety before a procedure or as a distraction from the procedure itself virtual reality is no longer priced out of possibility. With Google Cardboard costing just a few bucks and lots of open source software available it won’t be long before we see more departments trying it out. We hope to hear more from Andrew and his team in the near future to see how they are going.

The Model (3D printing in paeds) – Jasamine Coles-Black

Carrying in on with technological advancements in paediatrics Jas Coles-Black from the 3D lab at the Austin in Melbourne made the audience realise just how affordable 3D printing can be. A technology that once cost six figures is now cheaper than the average consultants coffee habit. After a quick jaunt through the various methods of printing she went through some of applications relevant to paediatric practice. With printable task trainers costing just a couple of dollars (after the capital expenditure) we could all have our own paediatric can’t intubate – can’t oxygenate model. Or perhaps you want your trainees to learn how to ultrasound the neonatal spine to improve their success at lumbar puncture – a task trainee is yours for less than a latte.

3D printing can also be used to help patients understand complex ideas and a number of cardio-thoracic surgeons have used 3D printed models of congenital heart defects to help explain complex anatomy. We are looking forward to hearing more from Jas about this exciting technology and how it can benefit all of us. And, if people are interested, we could create our very own DFTB 3D printing workshop at a future conference.

Jas' favourite 80s movie

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1g3_CFmnU7k

(Yes – I know it was 1977 – Ed)

Sound and Vision (Critical care ultrasound) – Tom Rozen

SMACCmini was competing against the very practical paediatric ultrasound workshop but we couldn’t make it through without mentioning it at least once. Tom Rozen, intensivist at the Royal Children’s Hospital, used the example of René-Théophile-Hyacinthe Laennec’s (yes, really!) most famous invention, the stethoscope, to demonstrate how medical fashion has changed. A device that once took up an entire room can now fit in your pocket and with ultra-cheap, ultra-portable devices entering the market it will not be long before clinicians can have a device of their very own.

If you want to know what all the fuss is about then why not sign up for one of our pre-DFTB19 workshops.

Too Shy (20 minutes of bottom jokes) – Ross Fisher

Mr Fisher was set the challenge of making talking about constipation interesting and he succeeded. From his opening Limahl tribute to the crowd singalong he soon had us tapping our toes to the 1983 Kajagoogoo classic. He began by asking us to turn to the person sitting next to us and take a bowel history. After a round of sniggers a fair percentage of the delegates were unable to complete the task. Fortunately I was sitting next to Tessa and we know each others bowel habits intimately. If we are too shy shy to ask a grown up about what they get up to in the toilet no wonder we are pretty awful at asking children. Most children are all smell, noise and little substance in the bathroom so the only way to really find out what they are up to is to ask them, in their own language.

Constipation and its consequences can be stigmatising to a child and so the mindful clinician should sit and listen to the parent and their concerns, without judgement. Treatment can be a long and drawn out affair taking as long to fix as the child has had the problem for.  Take a look at our series on constipation here.

Faith (It takes a team) – Bec Nogajski

The final talk of the morning, by Bec Nogajski, brought it all together and reminded us of the importance of teaming. We’ve all been a part of dysfunctional teams and Bec challenged us to look at our role in the team, not as a passive sheep to be lead around, but as an integral unit with worth. There are many ways of finding out how you might fit in the team – Belbin’s team roles, DISC, Myers-Briggs (INTJ in case you were wondering) – but it is worth considering  that there is no perfect recipe for an effective team.

The team sets the behaviour, what is tolerated and what is not. As David Morrison said, “The standard you walk past is the standard you accept.” So do you check your mobile phone during clinical handover, and allow others to do the same or is this type of behaviour below the line?

 

 

Our eternal thanks, as always, to the SMACC OC throughout the years, especially, Chris, Roger and Oli who made such an impact on four aspiring paediatricians that they decided that they could run their own conference. If you want to see what all the fuss is about then there are still a handful of tickets left for www.dftb19.com in London, this June.

The 28th Bobble Wrap

Cite this article as:
Leo, G. The 28th Bobble Wrap, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://dontforgetthebubbles.com/the-28th-bobble-wrap/

With millions upon millions of journal articles being published every year it is impossible to keep up. Today, being the 1st of April, the Don’t Forget The Bubbles Team thought it best to celebrate laughter and humour in children and our hospitals. The formal Bubble Wrap for April will be released next week.

Pulse oximetry

Cite this article as:
Andrew Tagg. Pulse oximetry, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18145

When a case is presented you probably like to assume aime things are a given – that capillary refill time is a universal constant no matter who performs it, or that the way one person measures the respiratory rate is the same as the next. I’m always a little intrigued as to how things are the way they are, and so this time I’m going to take a closer look at pulse oximetry.

Inequalities in Healthcare : Andrew McDonald at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Inequalities in Healthcare : Andrew McDonald at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18304

Dr Andrew McDonald worked as a paediatrician for many years before entering the world of politics. In his years as Shadow Minister for Health he continued to practice one day a week. In both roles he saw the impact that socio-economic status has on health and continues to do what he can to make difference. Why should those that need access to excellent health care not be afforded more healthcare resources? If you can afford to pay you can get in to see a private paediatrician in a week but if you are relying on the public system it is a matter of months. Andrew McDonald challenges the audience to think on this, and who they are really helping.

It can be hard to stand up to the status quo but if you are serious about helping people you must.

 

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story’ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families. Tickets for DFTB19, which will be held in London, UK, are now on sale from www.dftb19.com.

 

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

 

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Braithwaite J, Hibbert PD, Jaffe A, White L, Cowell CT, Harris MF, Runciman WB, Hallahan AR, Wheaton G, Williams HM, Murphy E. Quality of health care for children in Australia, 2012-2013. Jama. 2018 Mar 20;319(11):1113-24.

McGlynn EA, Asch SM, Adams J, Keesey J, Hicks J, DeCristofaro A, Kerr EA. The quality of health care delivered to adults in the United States. New England journal of medicine. 2003 Jun 26;348(26):2635-45.

Nolan T, Resar R, Haraden C, Griffin F, Gordon A. Improving the Reliability of Health Care. Institute for Healthcare Improvement 2004.

O’Brien M. Leading Reliability Improvement for Safer Healthcare. The Cognitive Institute, 2015.

 

Don’t Forget The Twitter

Cite this article as:
Grace Leo. Don’t Forget The Twitter, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18310

Perhaps you’ve been introduced to FOAMed and have dipped a toe into the land of Twitter but until now have been hesitant about joining in… here are some top tips from the DFTB Team to help you on your Twitter journey at the upcoming conference and beyond!

Cutting edge burns management: Fiona Wood at DFTB18

Cite this article as:
Team DFTB. Cutting edge burns management: Fiona Wood at DFTB18, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18295

Professor Fiona Wood, AM, is one of the worlds leading burns surgeons.  Having qualified from St Thomas’ in London she decided to do what so many of us do and move down under. Since the early days of her career, she has recognized that to improve the outcomes of burns victims involves not just scarless skin but also healing in mind and spirit. Along with Marie Stoner, she pioneered the use of ‘spray-on skin’ and is well known for the care she provided to the victims of the Bali bombings back in October 2002.

In this talk, she talks about the past, the present and the future of burns care whilst championing the roles of women in medicine and surgery. As a mother of six children, she reminds us all that there is nothing that cannot be achieved if you ask for it.

 

This talk was recorded live at DFTB18 in Melbourne, Australia. With the theme of ‘Science and Story’ we pushed our speakers to step out of their comfort zones and consider why we do what we do. Caring for children is not just about acquiring the scientific knowhow but also about taking a look beyond a diagnosis or clinical conundrum at the patient and their families.

If you want our podcasts delivered straight to your listening device then subscribe to our iTunes feed or check out the RSS feed. If you are more a fan of the visual medium then subscribe to our YouTube channel. Please embrace the spirit of FOAMed and spread the word.

 

iTunes Button

 

 

Are rigors a sign of serious bacterial infection?

Cite this article as:
Alasdair Munro. Are rigors a sign of serious bacterial infection?, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18150

Noah is an 18m old boy who presents with fever since yesterday evening. He’s been eating and drinking a little less than usual but wetting nappies regularly. He’s been miserable when hot, but settles when his temperature comes down. His mum presented to A&E because whilst febrile this morning, he had an episode of shivering which lasted several minutes. He was conscious during the episode.

Global Developmental Delay

Cite this article as:
Mary Hardimon. Global Developmental Delay, Don't Forget the Bubbles, 2019. Available at:
https://doi.org/10.31440/DFTB.18033

Erin is a 3yo girl who is brought in by her mother, having been screened by the child health nurse as being developmentally delayed (and subsequently referred by GP). Her mother had noted that Erin was “slower than her other kids,” although presumed she was a “late bloomer” who would “catch up in her own time.”