DFTB in EMA #3 – Easing the Wheeze

Shares

The team at DFTB had our third article published in the series for Emergency Medicine Australasia Journal.

Wheezing children commonly present to the ED. Bronchiolitis, preschool wheeze and asthma are common causes of such presentations. It is important to note that the term ‘wheeze’ is frequently misused by parents to describe a number of respiratory noises, including transmitted upper airway sounds and stridor.[1] Wheeze is, in itself, a symptom manifested by ‘a continuous whistling sound during breathing that suggests narrowing or obstruction in some part of the respiratory airways’.[2] One British study reported that 29.3% of children have had a wheeze by the age of three, and 30% of preschoolers with recurrent wheeze are diagnosed with asthma by 6 years of age.[3, 4] This article briefly reviews the diagnosis and management of preschool wheeze, while considering recent guidelines on bronchiolitis and asthma.

Click here to read the full article – “Easing the wheeze.”

Reference:

Goldstein, H., Tagg, A., Lawton, B. and Davis, T. (2015), Easing the wheeze. Emergency Medicine Australasia, 27: 384–386. doi: 10.1111/1742-6723.12463

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

About 

A Paediatric Trainee based in Queensland, Australia, Henry is passionate about Adolescent Medicine & General Paediatrics, with a strong interest in Medical Education & Clinical Teaching. An admitted nerd & ironman with a penchant for Rubik’s Cubes & ‘Dad jokes’.

@henrygoldstein | + Henry Goldstein | Henry’s DFTB posts

Author: Henry Goldstein

A Paediatric Trainee based in Queensland, Australia, Henry is passionate about Adolescent Medicine & General Paediatrics, with a strong interest in Medical Education & Clinical Teaching. An admitted nerd & ironman with a penchant for Rubik’s Cubes & ‘Dad jokes’.

@henrygoldstein | + Henry Goldstein | Henry’s DFTB posts